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Google Issues Response to Third Party Chromecast App Situation

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When you tinker with unfinished software and APIs, you sometimes have to expect certain things to break after updates. That was the case when Google sent out the latest update to Chromecast, which left many third party apps for the HDMI dongle in a non-working state. One app in particular that was affected was Koush’s local video sharing application called AllCast. After the update broke his app, Koush publicly addressed the update as an intentional move to kill off his app’s video playback functionality through Chromecast, even going as far as stating that the device would probably end up not being friendly to indie developers. 

In true Google fashion, since they do monitor the happenings inside the community, the company released a statement to TechCrunch addressing what happened.

We’re excited to bring more content to Chromecast and would like to support all types of apps, including those for local content. It’s still early days for the Google Cast SDK, which we just released in developer preview for early development and testing only. We expect that the SDK will continue to change before we launch out of developer preview, and want to provide a great experience for users and developers before making the SDK and additional apps more broadly available.

So, long story short – if we plan on messing around with unfinished SDKs that are in testing only arenas, or decide to reverse engineer related products, then maybe we shouldn’t be surprised if we get shut down until the final revisions are made available to the public. If you are really bummed about AllCast dying, we wouldn’t be surprised if Koush and company will continue developing the aforementioned app once this is all settled.

Via: TechCrunch

  • Daniel

    So, if the Chromecast SDK wasn’t ready, why did Google start selling the Chromecast when it did and make all of those promises? It’s always a bad thing when you overpromise and underdeliver. I bought one the day it was released, and I’m sorely disappointed that there aren’t more apps right now.

  • my2centz

    The chromecast as released does what does well but is very limited. My interest in it was the ability to stream from a browser window. When I realized it worked only through the chrome browser I had second thoughts. When I heard about the shenanigans going on between google and the developer i decided to wait until there is a non beta sdk and a mature body of apps available for it..

  • Mark Mann

    getting mad over something like this is akin to rooting, unlocking and romming your phone and installing software that doesn’t agree with your phone, and getting mad at google about it

  • Williams Blazekora

    Google Chromecast HDMI Streaming Media Player

    GOTO:

    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B00DR0PDNE/2013-09-20

    *Only 6 left in stock.** Lowest Prices Today! Free Shipping.‎

  • Lionel

    So I have a chromecast order open on Amazon with an eta of mid October. Is there a better way to go about getting one? Should I cancel and go through, Google Play? Should I try to walk in to a Best Buy and take a chance on what’s in stock? Any advice?

    • Luxferro

      Why not secure another before cancelling? It’s not like tying up $30 is gonna cripple you financially.

      • Lionel

        Good point, but I guess the main intent of my question was how do I get it faster than Mid October if possible? Physically going into best buy would be the obvious choice, but of course there’s no guarantee that it will be in stock. What’s faster than Amazon at this point?

        • p0k3y

          Use NowInStock.net is your best option. BBY has it available once a week now for the last 3 weeks. But you get only about 2-hour window to order. That site will send you a text alert as soon as it’s available. I got all 3 of mine that way, painlessly.

  • JMonkeYJ

    i think that a lot of the bickering over WHY Google blocked these apps (bickering due in no small part to Koush’s antagonistic statements) is missing the real issue. shouldn’t we all just be hoping that Google UN-blocks apps like these? what is the downside to us consumers if we have access to apps like AllCast in addition to apps like YouTube?

    • Franklin Ramsey

      Um, I would prefer Google block apps that exploit security holes.

      • JMonkeYJ

        haha, that, i would have to disagree with you on. i’ve had WAAAAYYY too much fun on my Android devices with apps that exploit security holes :-)

        i’m kind of kidding. i agree security holes are bad, but so much of what makes the Android scene great has been built around root, S-OFF, and the list goes on and on.

        • Franklin Ramsey

          But you could have all those things without exploiting security holes. Well, if the carriers weren’t so upset about unlocked devices and such. Take a look at computers. You can get a laptop with LTE built in and the carrier doesn’t get to lock it down. Why would they do that to phones?

          • JMonkeYJ

            i think the industry is slooowwwlly moving in the right direction. let’s hope.

  • bcorrell34

    So this is completely and utterly off topic but I’ve come to the end of my rope with the CM ROM and am looking for something new. Since this is the most recent DL post, I figured I’d have at it. Any suggestions with reasons? Battery life? Customization? Stability?

    • umbrellacorp

      AOKP.

      • bcorrell34

        Any reasons you specifically like this rom? Don’t need a full blown review just a few quick favorite features.

        • umbrellacorp

          Yes. I found that I could never get CM to have great battery life, bluetooth functionality or even decent phone calls. I have an SGIII and have heard that Samsung does not make the best radios for their cells but this problem was made much worse with CM.

          I switched to AOKP because of how stock it is, how great the battery life was and all the functionality worked – bluetooth, etc.

          Lots of cool skins for it, too. Try it out.

          • bcorrell34

            Fantastic. That is just about exactly what I’m looking for. I guess I could have found this out by looking at forums but DL users I find to be the most legit with their suggestions. I went from OG droid, to gnex, now want a new ROM to hold me over as something new until I get a new phone this winter. But that’s a whole different battle to tackle, I have no idea what the heck I’m going to switch to next. The G2 is probably what I’ll switch to if they make a GPE or have the bootloader unlocked.

      • Jeremy Martin

        You realize that AOKP is CM based with a unicorn and some extras right? Not saying they dont work to fix whats broke in CM nightlies but still its CM based.

        • umbrellacorp

          Nope, I actually did not know that. Whatever they do differently makes a world of difference.

        • Ben Freund

          AOKP is not CM based.

          • Jeremy Martin

            You are correct so I am going to retract my statement above. I could have sworn it was when I read about it a year or so ago. But you are right….this is from their site:
            “For one, AOKP is lightweight. Most OEMs provide a heavy UI layer over Android and have loads of bloatware (i.e. apps that not everyone use every day, but you cannot remove because they’re “baked in” by default). Since AOKP is built upon vanilla Android source, it has neither of the above.”

        • umbrellacorp

          No worries, bro!

    • Tim242

      What device do you have?

      • bcorrell34

        GNex Toro. Funny, my printer is just warned me that my Cyan was close to end of life.

        • Tim242

          I had the Gnex for a year. I used AOKP the entire year I had it. I never had battery or performance issues. It has more customization than you can shake a stick at haha

          • bcorrell34

            Well two people have said AOKP. I shall try that. CM seems to not have great battery life and the nightlies have completely screwed my phone up, granted they warn you, but like, come on. I’ve had to factory reset, wipe, and reinstall a stable one about 4 times this month.

          • Jeremy Martin

            AOKP is CM with extras.

          • bcorrell34

            What do you suggest then?

          • Jeremy Martin

            I ran cm on my toro most of the time but when I didn’t I ran mmuzzys ROM. I posted the link in an above post. Very nice stable AOSP ROM.

          • bcorrell34

            Alright I’ll check it out. I do enjoy the features of CM just wanted something more stable and optimized for battery life, but also include the extended features. Thanks for the help.

    • bcorrell34

      On another note, I wonder if developers will be able to take a quad core phone and dedicate one of them to language processing. This would be amazing to port over Moto X features over to a custom ROM for a phone with high end specs.

    • Jeremy Martin

      Most ROM’s are based with CM code. If you want to go away from CyanogenMod then you need to investigate that aspect. MMuzzys rom for the GNex is a good one.

    • Ben Freund

      Three additional things, if you have a GNexus:

      For the Verizon Gnexus, the cheapo ZeroLemon extended giant battery was the best thing I’d ever done. I had to take an xacto knife to cut out the mic holes in the case because the case design is poor (and I ended up cutting out the power hole too) and it is a big phone now. But I still don’t care. I get over a day even with very heavy use. It is on par with my wife’s Nexus 7 battery usage now. This kind of made the Rom battery usage issue moot.

      I still use AOKP though, but mostly because I’m addicted to the way their toggles, ribbons/navbars, and Navigation Ring work. For example I’ve set long press to switch to the previous app. Think about how many times you want to just go to the previous app and don’t want to bother with the recent apps list. I’d say 80% of the time. Nightlys are up at http://aokp.co but keep in mind the 4.3 code isn’t done/available in AOKP yet, so you’ve got a few more days to wait if you want to try 4.3.

      And last: No matter what rom you’ve got, until you get on 4.3 you really should get the LagFix app to fix the degrading memory problem. I notice a huge speed improvement. 4.3 will add trim natively so you shouldn’t need it then.

      • bcorrell34

        Thanks for the help. I’ll look into the case idea, but as far as another ROM I’ve heard AOKP is great but others saying its CM with added features. This scares me because the stability of CM has been terrible as of late.

  • umbrellacorp

    Here’s a song dedicated to my homeboy Koush for his response:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DksSPZTZES0

  • Justin Barrett

    DL community freaking out over something trivial? WEIIIIRRRDDDD…

  • chris420o

    take a breath guys…including koush…its google’s product let them make their money a little before they start letting us tinkerers scheme

  • Jeremy Martin

    I have never seen so much hate for development as I have seen in this disqus thread. The same people with the “well its doing what its advertised to do so Koush must stfu” attitude are the same people who would have gladly used AllCast even if you dont want to admit it now. Probably are even using Rom Manager and Helium as well.

    I have seen people claiming Android enthusiasts are consumed with entitlement when that statement has no real relation to what is being discussed here. The only reason to say that is to spew out some misdirected venom for some reason.

    I have seen so many people piss all over Koush for he being upset. After all he was trying to make something awesome out of something that was already great and share it with the rest of us. Then I read people complain he wanted money for it so now he cant make money off it he is saying not to buy it…thats not the case at all but yet people jumped on it.

    I could keep going but it’s just as sad to see all this venom over Koush just simply pointing out something that Google intentionally blocked. A lot of people agree with Koush but that must be the “entitled” crowd. I have a Chromecast and yes it does whats on the box so I am happy with that fact. However it can do so much more if Google would allow it and for that I’m disappointed. Google has responded so there might be hope…Google wouldnt have responded if Koush did not make the statements he did and if Koush did not have the support he has for his development.

    • Franklin Ramsey

      I think you misunderstand. Google blocked it because Koush was using a reversed engineered hole in a Beta SDK to get AllCast to work. Google patched a security hole in their unfinished software and for that reason Koush gets mad because it broke something he did. I’d be more than happy to have the ability to do local streaming with my Chromecast, but a developer complaining that an app they weren’t supposed to be releasing because the SDK was still in developer preview is silly and borders on being idiotic.

      • Luxferro

        Maybe if they added something instead of taking away from someone’s fun, then people wouldn’t be annoyed. It wasn’t hurting anyone. It’s not as if a chromecast contains personal info, or could be used in a malicious way. They could have left it until they opened up the abilities to do the same thing the way they intend to (if they even do).

        The big portion of the Android dev scene is adding things that Google themselves don’t. And without these guys we might as all have cookie cutter iphones.

  • darrylelinedse325

    I make $82h while I’m traveling the world. Last week I worked by my laptop in Rome, Monti Carlo and finally Paris…This week I’m back in the USA. All I do are easy tasks from this one cool site. check it out, http://www.Pro67.com

  • http://randomphantasmagoria.com/ Shawn

    Koush is being a crybaby here. Simple as that. It’s a developer preview and it makes all the sense in the world for Google to not want 3rd parties developing apps for it yet. This is the exact same reason that Google never open sourced Honeycomb until ICS dropped. They didn’t want hack developers shoehorning it into phones and creating awful user experiences in the process.

    Koush, your development efforts over the years have been nothing less than awesome. In this case, however, you’re just being a prima donna. Stop it. It’s not very becoming.

  • http://profiles.google.com/thelolotov Jacob Davis

    I don’t like Koush. Just gonna say it. He’s kind of an egotistical prick.

    • Keith

      It’s like you climbed into my brain and read my thoughts!

      • http://profiles.google.com/thelolotov Jacob Davis

        Shh… Just let it happen… Yum… Hopes and dreams…

    • Guest

      More like an Ass Hole if you ask me…I don’t like him either (smart or not). Sorry, but I agree with JD.

      • http://profiles.google.com/thelolotov Jacob Davis

        Glad I’m not the only one.

  • Stingray

    The world does not revolve around Koush, contrary to popular belief….

    • Ryan

      No, but he’s a hell of a developer. Props to him I’ve supported him on numerous apps. I don’t see this as an attack from Google. They have a legitimate reason for it, and it’ll all work out in the end. /drama

  • Tony Byatt

    I was kinda shocked at all the outrage this morning. I thought us Android folks were a little more in tuned with the process…

    • Steve B

      For some reason a lot of Android enthusiasts have become extremely bitter over the past couple months. I’ve noticed the comment threads becoming more and more hostile and riddled with ignorant comments. Not really sure what’s going on here?

      • Justin Barrett

        Entitlement. Consumerism. Simple as that.

  • JMonkeYJ

    The statement doesn’t really address the situation. The apps aren’t support because of some natural SDK progression or bug fix. The latest update actually specifically removed functionality from Chromecast to kill this type of apps. Now Google is totally entitled to do this since it’s their beta software, but it’s also definitely a dick move, and not an innocent one as they are trying to portray. I still think in the future this functionality will probably be embraced. My outlook isn’t as negative as Koush’s.

    • storm14k

      There was never any published API or functionality to do what he did in the first place. He reverse engineered his way into it. The whole point of an API is so that implementation can change while maintaining the same outward facing contract with other software. If you tie your app directly to the implementation and bypass the API you are asking for it.

      • Adrynalyne

        Thank you. I have a feeling that those who don’t understand why this happened do not understand the point of using APIs.

      • JMonkeYJ

        i guess my thinking is more that the WHY of them blocking it doesn’t really matter. shouldn’t we all just be hoping that they UN-block the streaming functionality? after all, as the consumers it’s a win for us if it has this functionality.

        • Franklin Ramsey

          Technically they haven’t blocked streaming at all, they blocked 3rd party apps that were using a security hole in an unfinished SDK. So I think the thing to hope for will be an SDK with APIs that allow for streaming.

    • PhoenixPath

      “The latest update actually specifically removed functionality from Chromecast to kill this type of apps. ”

      They didn’t remove it. They blocked it. The code is still there. Google just doesn’t want anyone using it until they give the go-ahead.

      They’ve barely marketed this thing. Most of it’s public awareness is from people who’ve used it. The last thing they want is someone coding up some roughshod app that barely works and having that become the “face” of ChromeCast. I’m not saying Koush’s app was that, but it held the door wide open.

      Google simply closed the door until they could finalize the code necessary on *their* end.

  • http://friv-2.yepi-yepi.com/ Friv2games

    Same problems as some phone of BlackBerry

  • john

    So you sold an unfinished product.
    Don’t be like apple, just keep your mouth shut, we’re not clones.
    Maybe Koush was holding it wrong.

    • j

      Uh no.. they released a product with an unfinished SDK. Do you have any idea what that even means?

      • PhoenixPath

        Did you read his post? The answer to your question is obvious…

    • storm14k

      If you understand anything about software and APIs you’d know all products are unfinished. Otherwise we’d still be on pre-Cupcake Android.

    • PhoenixPath

      Product was finished. Advertised functionality is working. Additional functionality planned for the future and the SDK for future 3rd party development is still being worked on.

      Sorry, but you seemed to be a bit confused on that whole bit there.

  • Sam Williams

    Your tanqueray ad makes your site unusable through chrome on my galaxy nexus…forces the screen down to the ad…

    • Jeff McLean

      Seriously!!!!!!! I can’t even view droid life on my phone anymore….. refreshed down to the ad every 4 seconds

    • Godzilla

      This

      • Godzilla ❤ Sarge

        ^^^^not this

    • D.B.Evans

      I gave up trying to view Droid-life through my phone a while ago. If I see something in gReader worth reading, I just mark it and view when I get to a PC. It’s a shame, I like the site; but it’s ironically not phone-friendly for viewing.

    • KleenDroid

      The only reason I can view this site is because I kill all ads.

      • Tim242

        Yeah, same here. The ads take over otherwise.

    • Anon

      Ditto. Hate this ad, and those of us on Jelly Bean 4.2.2 and later default to Chrome. That Tanqueray ad needs to go –a Droid site should have Android-friendly ads.

    • panicswhenubered

      I have the same problem. Hit settings and check the “request desktop site” option. It will stop auto scrolling to the ad.

  • Fresh360

    It’s a $35 streaming key, if it does nothing else than what it does now I am happy. Sometimes the Android community has a very high sense of entitlement. Who else gets mad when something they buy ONLY does what it says it does on the box.

    • BSweetness

      Agreed. I can’t wait to see future development because the possibilities are wide open, but even if it didn’t go anywhere, I’d be completely happy with the current functionality for the price point.

      • Paul Hansen

        As long as the big streaming players get on board I’m happy with it. Netflix/Spotify/Pandora/HBO alone would make it worthwhile with it’s chrome tab ability. I’m sure there are more things coming people just need to be patient.

        • http://www.getintonursing.com/ Jon

          If I just get Hulu in the mix…I’m a happy camper. Hulu, Netflix and YouTube account for 100% of what I use to stream content.

    • George264

      Exactly. It’s 35$, that’s like a couple days worth of meals. It’s like buying a microwave and getting mad at the fact that you can’t do more than just heat things up.

    • Tim242

      The point of Android is to be able to do more than what can be done out of the box. We complain about locked bootloaders for the same reason. We root for the same reason.

      • Fresh360

        To expand functionality out of the box IS NOT the point of Android, the ability to do so is an added bonus. Your comparison of a $600 dollar piece of equipment and a $35 streaming dongle is truly apples and oranges; the main complaint about locked bootloaders is because of the high price of the equipment coupled with the fact that the manufacturers often have no qualms with unlockalable bootloaders its the carriers whom we pay exhorbent fees to every month to be told “No you can not do ‘that’ with the phone you paid for”. The Chromecast is by all reviews a great piece of equipment that is simple to use and very cheap; Would I like expanded functionality? OF COURSE! Will I rant when the $35 dongle does EXACTLY what it says on the box, and the BETA SDK is updated so hacks (which “self destructed” every 48hrs because they too were in BETA) stop working? NO! I will just be happy with my item doing what I was told it would do, as you should.

        • Tim242

          I’m sorry, but your logic is flawed. Price is irrelevant. Regardless of price, the device is mine. Android is open source for a reason, not just some added bonus.

          • Franklin Ramsey

            I’m sorry, Tim, but your Logic is flawed. The device was purchased by you and on the box it stated what that device was able to do. Anything else that is later enabled wasn’t originally promised, nor was Chromecast said to be open source. It was billed as running a highly modified version of the Chrome OS and while that OS is open source, it doesn’t mean that device is. Also, Android being open source is a bonus that allows us to do many additional things with our devices, but complaining that a device doesn’t do things that the MFG never said it would do is illogical.

          • Tim242

            If I was stuck with just what the manufacturer advertised, I would not be an Android user.

          • http://randomphantasmagoria.com/ Shawn

            You’re probably the kind of guy that would install Linux on a wireless router just to say you did it, right?

          • Tim242

            Nope. I just like my devices to be mine. When I first started with Android 4 years ago, my sole purpose for rooting was to take screenshots. Then it was to uninstall bloat. Now, it is to make my device look and perform the way I want. I evolved to this point. It’s a lot like my diet. First I cut out beef and pork, then vegetarian, now vegan.

          • Franklin Ramsey

            I’m sure there are many Android users that stick with whatever it is that comes on their phone. Not wanting to flash roms or make changes doesn’t mean they aren’t Android users. You seem to be arguing that because Android is open source, we should leave all exploits and security holes in the OS so people can keep exploiting them. That is just plain ignorance.

          • Tim242

            You keep talking about security holes. The act of rooting a phone is only an exploit when something has been put in place to block it. Rooting a Nexus device doesn’t require an exploit. Some exploits are needed to get around crap that shouldn’t be there to start with. If carriers blocked the ability to run 3rd party launchers, I bet you’d be all for an exploit to get around that

          • Franklin Ramsey

            I’m not talking about rooting a phone. I’m talking about using the Chromecast in a way that it wasn’t intended to be used, with an SDK that hasn’t been finished and is still in development. This isn’t the same thing as getting root on a phone. Google blocked a security hole in a beta software. Your argument is flawed because it has nothing to do with the points being made.

          • Tim242

            Rooting a phone is a security hole. You keep talking about securityholes. You think some need to be blocked, but others are oOK. How is using Chrome Cast in a way you claim not to be intended any different than running root apps on an Android phone. Let’s just agree to disagree and move on.

          • Franklin Ramsey

            Root access in a phone isn’t a security hole. Sometimes it takes a security exploit to allow a user to get root access to a phone which one could argue should or shouldn’t be allowed. Think of Android as an OS (since that is what it is). In an OS they have these things called Administrator accounts which are used to access anything on that device. Root access is gaining access to the Root (IE: Administrator) account. Root access is ALWAYS on EVERY phone, it’s just sometimes you need to exploit something to gain access to that account. Do I think those exploits that allow access to Root should be patched? Yes. Those could allow for security exploits to be created. This doesn’t mean I don’t think people should be allowed to have root access to their device, but just like everyone doesn’t need administrator access to use their computer, not everyone needs root access. Patching security exploits is not a bad thing.

          • Luigi90210

            Uuuhhhh are you retarded?

            Rooting a nexus device is done via custom recovery which gives you full access to the system, to root a nexus device is directly modifying the system to allow root functions.

            You know those apps that allow you to root without unlocking your phone? Those are exploits and in fact there was a root exploit in 4.0 that allowed rooting without unlocking on a nexus device that was patched with the 4.1 update.

            I’m sorry but you sound like some stupid kid who couldn’t get what he wanted out of a $35 streaming stick when the streaming stick didn’t advertise any extra features like allshare provides.

  • Jeremy Martin

    My question is why is the Chromecast being sold if the sdk is still in dev stage? Seems they would have pulled it out of dev stage when they released the device.

    • Justtyn Hutcheson

      If you buy it for just streaming those things, what’s the problem? I never buy anything expecting it to do more than advertised. Hell, most of the time if it is even half as good as the manufacturer says it is, I’m ecstatic.

      It was super-cheap, and does what they said it does well. There is a ton of potential there, but even if it does nothing but stream Play content, Youtube, and Netflix, its still a cool accessory for the price.

      • KleenDroid

        The free three months of Netflix helps a lot. The ones at Best Buy still have it.

    • http://turbofool.com Jarrett Lennon Kaufman

      Because the Chromecast already does everything it was advertised, when they launched it at $35, to do. Anything else it does down the line is icing on the cake. The iPhone launched without ANY SDK.

    • blackjaguar25

      And people bought it anyways. So it’s doing what they advertised it to do.

      • Tim242

        This is Android. You know, the OS that let’s us do more than what’s advertised…

    • storm14k

      Even if it was in a stable state the whole point of an API is to shield you from the implementation so that it can change without breaking your software. Koush skipped the API because what he did was never intended as a feature of Chromecast at this point and may never be for all we know.

    • PhoenixPath

      Chromecast is a finished product.

      ChromeCast works as advertised. It is not still in development and it’s advertised functionaliyty works just fine.

      What they are working on is the Software Development kit that will eventually allow for *more* functionality through 3rd party application development.

  • akazerotime

    I think locking out the 3rd party developers is going to hurt the demand for the device. Now if you will excuse me, I have to list some items on eBay as 3 day auctions..

    • Michael

      The product is basically a developer preview for now. Just because one dev got his panties in a knot because he was told not to publicly release anything and he did anyway, and then things in the code for the device changed, doesn’t mean they’re locking anyone out.

      • mrjayviper

        being sold in retail shops is not developer only

        • mjsalinger

          The SDK is basically a developer preview for now. The device is a full product for Netflix, Youtube, Google Play streaming, and browser tab casting.

    • Justtyn Hutcheson

      They didn’t lock out third party developers though. They changed part of their system, and it broke the apps. That’s the risk on working with beta SDKs, and any reasonable app dev should know that.

      From the statement, it sounds like they broke the hacked apps unintentionally, but are planning on bringing the functionality to devices anyway. They told devs not to release apps for it, if you ignore them you can’t yell when your stuff breaks and you can’t rehack it immediately.

      Much ado about nothing IMO.

      • JMonkeYJ

        Koush actually posted the code of the update that shows they explicitly did block these apps intentionally. If you don’t read code, what Google did is leave all previous functionality intact, but added a tiny chunk of code that specifically looks for the code these developers were using and short-circuits it. in other words, they didn’t remove any of the code that performs the streaming, they just made it totally inaccessible with a very rudimentary and targeted hack. it’s really pretty damning evidence.

        • BrandoHD

          How is that damning?

          It would have been damning if they removed the code altogether, what they did is prevent someone from skirting the rules they put in place while they finalize the SDK

          • JMonkeYJ

            sorry, i meant it was damning in the sense that it shows they were intentionally targeting these apps, because Justtyn was speculating that it was unintentional.

            as i stated above, i totally agree it is their prerogative to edit their beta code in any way they see fit, and the devs shouldn’t be so surprised, but just because they *can* doesn’t mean they *have* to, and it’s kinda dick that they did.

          • Adrynalyne

            It was a dick move for developers to bypass APIs to get around whitelist restrictions. Google was up front about it, apps are only meant for testing at this time and receivers using them need to be whitelisted.

          • mjsalinger

            Not really. As a dev, you should use the SDK. Koush didn’t do that. He went around the SDK and reverse-engineered the code and used internal functions. Google probably blocked access because the code wasn’t fully baked yet, and they not only have every right to do it, they *should* do it to prevent bad code from getting out there and providing a bad user experience.

        • Sacrifist

          Wait, you mean there’s a chance Google is trying to build some goodwill with content providers so that someday they may natively support the device? God forbid.

          I don’t think anyone forgets what happened with Google TV – streaming what would otherwise be a paid service to your TV for free. How long did that take to get blocked by the providers?

        • PhoenixPath

          Damning evidence that they blocked access to unfinished functionality they told developers using the unfinished SDK not to use.

          Yep.

          Curse them, those foul … wait…

          Oh, you were being serious??

      • Chad Riley

        Chromecast was never meant to be open source as android is from what I gathered. Also, just because the software controlling the device is still considered “beta”, it doesn’t mean the device doesn’t work as advertised by google, which in fact it does exactly what it was designed to do.

        Koush jumped the gun and development should have been put on hold until the APi’s are released. I don’t blame google a single bit personally. People are expecting too much from this thing and while it is great that it has dev’s supporting it, it works well for what it is out-of-the-box.

        • Tim242

          Chrome Cast runs Android, therefore it is open source.

    • http://turbofool.com Jarrett Lennon Kaufman

      I highly doubt it. Most of the market has no clue what this CAN’T do. It’s being marketed for what it can, and that hasn’t changed. And they haven’t locked out third-party developers, anyway. They’ve merely continued updating the SDK, which will break support for anyone who’s trying to work around it. Once it’s finalized, things will be different.

    • PhoenixPath

      durrr, hurrr…derp?

      They are working on an SDK. Do you know what that is?

      SDK: Software Development Kit.

      No, genius. They are not locking out 3rd party developers. They are blocking access to unfinished functionality.

      • umbrellacorp

        THis wins.

  • dtraini30

    Seriously the internet + Koush freaked out. It was so annoying seeing everyone report how Google was the evil company because it updated its PREVIEW SOFTWARE. Koush was even trying to tell people to not get the Chromecast just because he cannot make software for it, it was kinda pathetic.

    /rant

    • Jordan Webb

      I can’t make money off this? Don’t buy it.

      • dtraini30

        Lol exactly!

      • Professor Hubert J. Farnsworth

        I always had a feeling he was motivated by money…like a lot of people.
        I bought the key for rom manager only to find out I had to pay again in order to flash CWM touch within the app. Total douche move on his part…a talented douche nonetheless.

        • DigitalDK

          I wasn’t as pissed about having to pay for CWM Touch as I was when I found out I have to pay PER DEVICE to install CWM Touch through RM. I even purchased it through the Play Store assuming that it would sync that purchase across future and current devices. When I got my S4 I was less than pleasantly surprised to find out this wasn’t the case and I needed to repurchase that crap again.

        • KleenDroid

          Strange that you never realized it was also available for free for those that didnt want to pay.

          • mustbepbs

            I know, right? You’re just paying for a donation and the ease of Google Play. Doing it yourself for free has been a thing at XDA for a long time, and the people who make these tools for us to use even give their stuff away on XDA for free.

          • KleenDroid

            Correct.

          • Droidzilla

            If I recall correctly, that’s also a prerequisite for posting as a dev on XDA; you have to give the software away to XDA members for free.

        • joseph barrientos

          well yeah, google wants partnerships with EVERY company they can get into, they have the money, motivation and the backing to do what they please, other companies tho wont jump on knowing people can alter the chromecast settings (piracy issues) i fully understand and back google up, they released a product that does what that said it would do, we cant get mad if it doesnt do what we want it to do, just dont buy one, i love my chromecast!

        • umbrellacorp

          Just about everyone is motivated by money… and that’s okay. It drives innovation. It, however, does not drive you to throw a tantrum like a hormonal teenager. That has a lot to do with your own personality and how you were raised.

      • Jeremy Martin

        That is not the case. Koush was going to GPL the AllCast software so you could compile it yourself and only release a paid AllCast compiled apk for people to buy. Why shouldnt he make some money for what he does? You cannot spare a few dollars for something that he has put a lot of time into?

        https://plus.google.com/110558071969009568835/posts/QAYmfCc16c5

        • storm14k

          I believe he is talking about the fact that Koush is telling people not to buy Chromecast just because his app broke and he may never be allowed to build such an app. People didn’t buy the thing for his app. They bought it to stream Netflix, YouTube, stuff from the browser and potentially Hulu, Pandora and other major content providers.

          • KleenDroid

            You are correct about the first one I bought. I bought a second one only because of his app.

          • addicuss

            always buy into something for what it is, not for what it potentially can be. Good lesson for girlfriends too (well minus the buy part… or maybe especially the buy part)

          • Paul Fulbright

            Then that is your problem, you bought a device when you either didn’t know, or care that the software you bought it for was in CLEAR violation of the SDK agreement.

            Worse still you bought it for a beta version of software built with beta SDK, nobody on earth could promise you that the same functionality would be possible (even if they WANTED it to be) with the final thing.

          • dragonflyr

            I’m buying chromecast for BOTH local and streaming. It MUST be able to play local content .. otherwise it is majorly deficient.

          • Franklin Ramsey

            Well in that case you are buying a product for something it wasn’t released to do in the hopes that functionality comes later. This isn’t the fault of Google if local media streaming never comes to fruition as this isn’t one of the things they said it would do when they released it.

    • BrandoHD

      You are so correct, when I commented on that G+ post, he went on to accuse me of not reading the post which I did, then he said the post was meant for his target audience, of course all the Koush fan boys agreed with him, it was nothing more that a sensational over-reaction by him and he won’t want to see it that way

      The guy actually reverse engineered a way to get around the embargo on the BETA SDK, then he calls Google out when they locked him out, that is really bold on his part, and to make matters worse, he decided to tell his target audience to *Not buy* the Chromecast, all because the loophole he was using was closed, that is very Prima-Dona like

      • https://www.facebook.com/aaron.williams.125 Champion1229

        Yeah, it was kinda sad… I mean I love the Android dev community but essentially broadcasting to the world that Google is some big evil JUST because they changed an UNOFFICIAL SDK is just plain dumb! Especially when Google has said over and over again that they have plans to incorporate local video playback in future updates and they will fully support third party devs ONCE the SDK goes live.

      • Joshua Hill

        It was equally as disappointing to see people presenting a counterpoint to your opinion misrepresented by you and others because you let emotion get in the way of actually interpreting what others had posted.

        • Paul Fulbright

          I swear to god every time I see your name in the comments it’s minor variations of this same exact thing, usually downvoted to hell.

          • Joshua Hill

            You are right. I take offence when people misrepresent me or misconstrue what I had written. I was taught to discuss on topic and literally interpret what others are saying. If people want to misrepresent me, misconstrue what I say and generally play the player and not the ball I will reiterate ad nauseam the point I was making and point out how what others are saying is not consistent with that. If this continues to see me downvoted does it look like I care or am about to change? I suggest you get used to it or tune out when you see my name in comments.

      • michael arazan

        If Google is saying this is an unfinished, unpolished product, why the hell are they selling it to the public already if the software is not a final product?

        Also chromium is not Open Source the same way Android is, so expect Google to take action with their prodfuct

        • mechapathy

          That’s not what they’re saying. They’re saying the SDK isn’t final. However, as with any Google product, and most tech products in general, there’s a release now, patch later ideology.

          • Adam Truelove

            So you want tech products to wait until they’re 100% done before release. So like never.

          • mechapathy

            When did I say that? I was explaining to @michaelarazan:disqus how things work.

          • Franklin Ramsey

            They released it now because it can do useful things and can do what it was sold to do. The SDK is to allow developers to use this device to do additional things. They aren’t patching it because it was unfinished.

          • mechapathy

            I’m not disputing the state of the Chromecast itself. I have one, and I love it. I’m using it right now. We’re talking about the SDK in this comment thread. The patch in question was to accommodate changes in the latest release of the unfinished SDK.
            Release now patch later is core to Google products and services. That’s why they’re comfortable releasing the device before the SDK is ready for widespread use.
            I guess I should have explained better, because my comment seems to be getting wildly misinterpreted.

          • Franklin Ramsey

            Well, they technically don’t have to release an SDK at all. Chromecast was a finished product by itself. It’s just icing on the cake that Google went ahead and decided to release an SDK at all in able to allow others to expand the devices use.

        • mjsalinger

          You’re wrong on two counts. Chromecast is not an unfinished, unpolished product. It actually works very well for what it was billed as. The SDK itself is unfinished and is in Beta. That is not part of the product. That’s like saying that I bought a Mac with OSX Mountain Lion, installed Mavericks beta, and complained that Apple released an unfinished, unpolished product because Mavericks breaks some things right now.

          Second, Chromium is open source the same way Android is. I can browse and build chromium from source right here. http://src.chromium.org/viewvc/chrome/

          Chrome, like Android, has some non-open source elements (drivers, Google proprietary software). So exactly how is Chromium not open source the same way Android is?

      • mechapathy

        Koush has always been kinda a drama queen, even in the days with CM on the OG Droid. He releases great software sometimes, but he has a god complex thing going on.

      • DaveCXT

        I disagree… It’s that type of “freak out” which actually got a RESPONSE from Google, which I’m quite impressed with.

        I and others have been “freaking out” as you call it about their seriously degraded Maps and Nave app for Android… yet we’ve received no response from Google over the issues. Quite honestly the lack of response due the serious issues has made me seriously question whether they listen to their user base at all.

        At least in this instance, Chromecast, they’ve given a reply that gives actual hope that we’ll have these abilities restored in the future. Their pattern of ignoring concerns up till now has been troubling and the feedback from them (as limited as it was) is a positive step by Google.

        Honestly, I’m much more concerned about the people who continually say ‘give them a break…. get used to the new crappy maps…. give them time’…. I’d say they are a little TOO trusting that Google will deliver the most useful product.

        I’d much rather give feedback, voice my concerns (even if proven wrong) hoping that they might listen than sit back and realize a year or two later that something which held so much promise was neglected into oblivion.

        • BrandoHD

          Good point, but firstly, the Chromecast does everything it was advertised as doing, secondly, the SDK is not finalized, Koush agreed to play by the rules, then he found a way to break the rules, developed an app and released it, who develops a beta on top of a beta then cries foul when it breaks, then advises people to “Not Buy” until they see how Google finalizes the SDK

          Why didn’t he wait till Google finalized the SDK then release his app???

          • LG71

            Than why release unfinished product. You understand you are paying to Google to be their beta testers.

          • Paul Fulbright

            They didn’t release an unfinished product, they released an unfinished SDK, which nobody had to pay to access.

          • LG71

            To me if nobody can write any apps for it, the product would worthless. People will it garbage out of Google’s hand as long as it is shiny and I actually like android.

          • Paul Fulbright

            Nobody can write apps for it? Don’t you mean one guy, right now, can’t write AN app for it? The very fact an SDK exists negates your entire point.

            Well aside from your pointless nonsense about people eating garbage from their hand, which implies the chromecast is garbage, which is funny because I’ve yet to know anyone who hasn’t used the hell out of their. Hell my g/f uses it more than I do, that right there should tell you something about how appealing it is.

            But because time-bomb apps in beta that run with a beta SDK which werent supposed to be distributed are maybe intentionally and maybe not intentionally blocked by google so the functionality YOU want isn’t there right now it’s pure garbage and we are all fools…

          • LG71

            Yes, if it’s breaks apps then you can successfully write apps with it. You release SDK and than you release device. Google’s way of getting away from is to release a beta and stay beta for long time and that way can hide behind “beta” sign. Stop defending google “beta”. Stop this BS. Google is here to make money that is all.

          • my2centz

            Google seems to do this with all their products. How long did gmail stay beta? I agree with the poster that they should release the SDK before they sell millions of the devices.

        • Paul Fulbright

          I don’t know that the kind of attention he got, is the kind we want. It’s going to make this a VERY adversarial relationship, REALLY quickly, and instead of having an SDK people can use early to get a head-start, they are going to keep it to themselves until it’s done.

          What he did got attention but what were his motives? I mean, yeah closing it sucks, but nobody has any proof they actively targeted the functionality he exploited do they? Even so, he released time-bomb software, it’s just not the kind of thing you want going on, if this was final SDK and they did this, I agree, he should bitch and attention is good but few if anyone would be calling it a knee-jerk freak out and google would ACTUALLY have done something dumb, as opposed to, WORST case, they told everyone in advance you CANNOT distribute your software based on beta SDK, and he did it, and they stopped him.

          Absolutely the most expected outcome in the world.

    • mitch deadberg

      thank you

    • Jeremy Martin

      Koush only pointed out that one of the many things you could do with the Chromecast that made it more than a youtube tool was intentionally blocked by Google. His ideas and effort made the Chromecast more than just a youtube/netflix device and added the ability to do so much more with it. Google decided to dumb it down and he called them out on it.

      • Adrynalyne

        You mean, they closed a hole he exploited to get around Google’s rules for playing with a preview SDK.

        • Jeremy Martin

          Yea once again the point is missed. It was not an exploit more so than something that was allowed. The bitching is not just from the fact a “hole” was closed but more so that development was blocked in the new SDK that could have made the chromecast so much more.

          • Jeff Tycz

            you also missed that this is NOT the final SDK and only a BETA. If you take a look at the developer site it clearly states the SDK can and will change and is not to make production apps. https://developers.google.com/cast/release-notes

          • Paul Fulbright

            Publishing software built with the SDK, period, was not allowed, accessing it, period, was not “allowed”. If he didn’t use the SDK that is fine but he also wasn’t “allowed” to do so, and it is entirely possible that the method he used, if not provided for by the SDK could be seen as a security risk. So either he used the SDK and wasn’t allowed to publish it to begin with or he didn’t even look at the SDK and exploited a hole that was plugged, that probably SHOULD be plugged as long as it is replaced, as they have said it would be, with a way to play local media when the SDK is final.

        • Tim242

          Exploits are used to root. I guess that should be blocked as well…

          • Adrynalyne

            And they are, regularly. You gonna run to iOS now?

          • Tim242

            You are incorrect. Google has never blocked root. That would be carriers. Get you info correct before trying to be a smart*ass.

          • Adrynalyne

            You are incorrect. OEMs block root. Google closes security holes as well. Exploits are holes. Nobody should have holes in security.

          • Tim242

            Exactly. Google doesn’t block it. I thought you said they block holes in their security? You are all over the board.

          • Adrynalyne

            I said they do if it exists in Android. Is reading hard for you?

            http://www.androidcentral.com/android-43-and-beyond-root-going-away-stock-roms

            No, Google wouldn’t do THAT!

          • Festus Haggen

            You’re arguing with a respected dev. I’m sure he knows more than you.

          • Tim242

            I don’t respect him. He is arguing against the purpose of Android.

          • Rammstein

            It doesn’t matter if you don’t. Others, like myself, do. The purpose of android isn’t to have a bunch of security holes.

          • Tim242

            Rooting is not a security hole. The ability to root is in stock AOSP. That’s why no exploit is needed to root a Nexus. An exploit is only needed to get around the lock that carriers and OEM’s put on functionality.

          • Adrynalyne

            Nobody said rooting was a security hole. However, the method to do it, IS a security hole unless it is a developer or Nexus device.

          • Tim242

            That is my point. The point of Android is to be able to do more with it than what you get out of the box. If carriers/OEM’s didn’t block core functionality, the exploit wouldn’t be needed.

          • Adrynalyne

            I agree. However, that in itself is not a good reason why security holes should not be patched up. Not everyone has good intentions out there. You should spend a few months in IRC and listen to some of the security researchers there. Pretty scary how these exploits can be used. Some even for remote access, wiping, and bricking when used maliciously.

            I’d love for an open device policy. Unfortunately, its been limited to developer editions, unlockable devices, and nexus devices.

          • acras

            And sadly , it has been shown that even the Nexus program isn’t totally open , due to propriety drivers for chipsets etc. JBQ leaving AOSP over the issue I think shows that it will never truly be open the way some fantasize that it should.

          • Adrynalyne

            You are right. The JBQ fiasco was a real eye opener. These conflicts will exist while closed source is used within Android. I don’t see how that can ever be solved unless one of the big SoC makers opens their source. I doubt that will ever happen.

          • acras

            You , like so many others are confused . Chromecast is not “Android” , it is running a version of Android. There is nothing that says that a manufacturer can’t protect a device or their concept of how it should function just because it runs “open source” software .

          • Tim242

            Your logic is flawed. Carriers/OEM’s have the same rights with phones. Let root forever be blocked, and see what uproar there would be. Some of you want to defend locking this device down, but grab your pitchforks at others being locked down.

          • Franklin Ramsey

            Tim, are you really arguing that security holes shouldn’t be closed? Google patched a security hole in their product and this is a bad thing? It broke the way AllCast works. I’m sure he will find some other way to get it working again once the SDK is out of BETA.

          • Paul Fulbright

            It is pretty clear he has zero clue what rooting a device actually means. The root he thinks of with a nexus device is flashed via an unsecured bootloader, which is fine because as I bet you know but he doesn’t, some random app running on the device can’t just run the bootloader whenever the hell it wants and flash away as it pleases. The root he talks about with carriers is because they DONT unlock their bootloaders and security flaws are exploited.

            If he can’t figure that out I have little hope for him understanding that if YOU can do it for root, so can any other app…for whatever purpose they choose.

          • acras

            I don’t like that they are locked down , but the carriers have the right to lock them down, just like I have the right to bypass the carriers and their restrictions by buying a Nexus straight from Google , then still be at the mercy of the chipset makers hoping that they will allow the binaries to be published. Again , Android is open source , devices don’t have to be just because they run open software . How many devices run variations of linux but the device is locked down?

          • Paul Fulbright

            I wasn’t aware there was a single point to android, so that is good to know, thanks.

            You are confusing bootloader with OS, and this is dumb anyways because the chromecast doesn’t run Android so why are we even talking about it? No carrier run version of Android is any more or less INTENTIONALLY friendly to rooting than the next, some are more SECURE than the next, but the OS itself isn’t built to be rooted.

            The bootloader however, ABSOLUTELY more or less likely to be root friendly.

          • Tim242

            Chrome Cast absolutely runs Android. See screenshot below. Now, stfu troll.

          • Paul Fulbright

            You even fail to read your own screenshot, you searched for exactly what you wanted (not “what OS does chromecast run” for instance) and you got three conflicting results in the top one, one says it has it’s roots in android, the other says it runs a variant of google TV which, btw isn’t “android”, and one post of the three says “android with stricter restrictions” which while I appreciate it was posted on this site, doesn’t prove jack diddly.

          • Paul Fulbright

            You REALLY need to stop talking. Holy crap. Couldn’t be any more wrong.

          • Paul Fulbright

            You are full of oh so many non-sequitors, you not respecting someone doesn’t mean they aren’t respected.

            You don’t seem to know basic english very well.

          • Raven

            You are incorrect. As of Android 4.3 specific changes were made to the Android filesystem to make it almost impossible to have root without unlocking the bootloader. I am happily enjoying root on my OG Google Nexus 7 with stock 4.2.2 and a locked bootloader, but if I were to upgrade to 4.3 not only would I loose root like you always do with an OTA, but for the first time I would not be able to regain it with Voodoo OTA Rootkeeper. That has nothing to do with the Carriers.

          • Tim242

            Fastboot OEM unlock

          • Raven

            Yes, I know I can go that route, but I have never had to unlock anything before to use root on my 6 Android devices and unlocking will wipe it, and yes I know there are a few ways to go about backing up and restoring everything but I don’t currently have the free time to deal with that, so I am avoiding updating as long as I can.

            My point was that Google, not the Carriers, specifically made changes to Android 4.3 to block root. Times, they are a changing, and not always for the better for the people that want more control over their devices.

            http://www.androidcentral.com/android-43-and-beyond-root-going-away-stock-roms

          • Paul Fulbright

            You are incorrect. Go unlock a new Nexus 7, step 1, unlock bootloader, step 2, flash root. Do it in stock android without unlocking the bootloader, tell me how that works out.

            Does google make HTC’s bootloaders? No. Do they update Samsungs roms? No. Do they allow taking root on stock Android? No. Just like HTC (most of the time) they DO allow you to unlock the bootloader though.

          • Tim242

            Allowing you to unlock the bootloader is allowing you to root. Step 1, step 2.

          • Paul Fulbright

            You just displaying how little you understand about this. Your point was that CARRIERS lock down root, google, historically, did not, which is not true.Root is an OS level modification, unlocked bootloader is like the BIOS on your computer.

            When it comes to gaining root Google is EVERY bit as aggressive about patching the exploits as any carrier or phone manufacturer. The only difference is, they also let you unlock the bootloader.

            Saying the patches released to fix security holes that were exploited to gain root means a carrier blocks root is EXACTLY describing what Google does, they ABSOLUTELY patch security holes as soon as they can.

            You just genuinely do not understand this enough to understand why you are wrong, and a whole thread full of people cannot sway you.

    • PhoenixPath

      Bingo.

      It’s amazing how quick Android fans turned on Google.

    • schoat333

      This is how the Android community is now. Thinking Rational has escaped most of them.

      Android used to be a community as a whole. It seems it has now turned into Developers VS. Enthusiasts/Users.

      • foghorn67

        Have you noticed how hostile the XDA community is towards the average joe? It’s kind of sad.

    • davecxt

      I disagree… It’s that type of “freak out” which actually got a RESPONSE from Google, which I’m quite impressed with.

      I and others have been “freaking out” as you call it about their seriously degraded Maps and Nave app for Android… yet we’ve received no response from Google over the issues. Quite honestly the lack of response due the serious issues has made me seriously question whether they listen to their user base at all.

      At least in this instance, Chromecast, they’ve given a reply that gives actual hope that we’ll have these abilities restored in the future. Their pattern of ignoring concerns up till now has been troubling and the feedback from them (as limited as it was) is a positive step by Google.

      Honestly, I’m much more concerned about the people who continually say ‘give them a break…. get used to the new crappy maps…. give them time’…. I’d say they are a little TOO trusting that Google will deliver the most useful product.

      I’d much rather give feedback, voice my concerns (even if proven wrong) hoping that they might listen than sit back and realize a year or two later that something which held so much promise was neglected into oblivion.

  • FknTwizted

    i would like to see this product have the ability to show all that is on screen of your android so you can play games, watch movies, etc… then it will be beast!

    • Justtyn Hutcheson

      I’m sure mirroring is coming. We are still very very early in its development

    • JMonkeYJ

      That will be really hard. Latency will be a huge issue. I hope they can figure it out somehow.

      • Aardvark99

        The screen mirroring AirPlay thing works pretty well on iOS – Apple figured it out. I use it between a windows application (AirServer) and my work iPhone for demos and it’s great (I assume Apple TV receivers work even better). I wish there was an Android equivalent that worked as well (android VNC servers aren’t so great).

        • normmcgarry

          To really achieve the speeds to do this without latency, it needs to be built into the graphics chip. Like, I’m sure Miracast-compatible devices are super fast with a Miracast-compatible receiver. All the streaming compression happens right on the chip, not at the software level, so it saves a lot of time and resources.

    • storm14k

      This already exists. You want a device that supports Miracast and a Miracast dongle or capable TV.

      • Joey Ipp

        Yeah…that works on about 4 devices sold in the US, not very accessible.

  • Chatman

    KoushCast…coming soon…

    • Michael

      So no support, and tirades against anyone who doesn’t like product?

      • WTH

        ???

  • Fozzybare

    I wish Fling would still work from my computer…streaming MKVs and AVIs to the Chromecast was nice even though it really didnt have any controls other than play, pause or stop.