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T-Mobile Announces “JUMP!” as New Phone Upgrade Policy, Lights Up 116th LTE Market, Intros Sony Xperia Z

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T-Mobile is still on stage in New York at the time of writing this, unveiling all sorts of new company initiatives, but since the press release for it all has already gone live, let’s talk about it. We’ve got four big things to discuss:  their new JUMP! phone upgrade policy, the launch of their 116th 4G LTE market, a new family option, and the release of the Sony Xperia Z on their network. 

In terms of JUMP!, we’re looking at a $10 per month charge per phone that allows you to upgrade your phone whenever you’d like (sort of) and protects against malfunction, damage, loss or theft. You can upgrade phones using T-Mobile’s Equipment Installment Program (EIP) twice every 12 months after you have been a part of JUMP for six months. All you have to do is trade in your previous phone in “good working condition” at any store. If you have remaining payments on that phone, they will be wiped out, since you’ll likely add on a new payment plan when you buy a new phone. New phones will be purchased at the same price as new customers.

On the 4G LTE front, T-Mobile announced today that they are now live in 116 metropolitan areas, reaching 157 million people across the country. They were initially expecting to hit 100 million people by this point, but as the numbers suggest, they have crushed that goal. By the end of the year, they are expecting to be in more than 200 metropolitan areas, and covering more than 200 million people.

T-Mobile also announced a new “breakthrough” family option for their customers. This new plan gives families with four lines of unlimited talk, text and web (up to 500MB of high-speed data) for $100 per month. There is no credit check or annual contract.

And finally, T-Mobile announced that they are now carrying the Sony Xperia Z. The device will launch on July 17 for $99 down, but if you pre-order it on July 16, they’ll toss in a free Sony Bluetooth speaker as a gift. If you don’t feel like waiting until July 16, you can purchase the Xperia Z from 38 different Sony stores as early as today.

XperiaZ_black_front-NEW

More info about JUMP! can be found at T-Mobile’s site.

T-Mobile Announces Boldest Moves Yet as America’s Un-carrier

 – Unveils JUMP!(TM) – a groundbreaking approach to more frequent phone upgrades
– Rapidly expands 4G LTE network to cover 157 million people in 116 metro areas
– Launches four-line family plan for $100 per month

NEW YORK – July 10, 2013 – T-Mobile US, Inc. (NYSE: TMUS) isn’t resting after turning the industry upside down with its “Un-carrier” approach to wireless earlier this year. It’s picking up the pace and continuing to revolutionize wireless for consumers.

At an event in New York today, America’s Un-carrier announced a groundbreaking new program, JUMP!(TM), which enables people to upgrade their phones when they want, up to twice a year as soon as six months from enrollment.

“At some point, big wireless companies made a decision for you that you should have to wait two years to get a new phone for a fair price. That’s 730 days of waiting. 730 days of watching new phones come out that you can’t have. Or having to live with a cracked screen or an outdated camera,” said John Legere, president and CEO of T-Mobile US. “We say two years is just too long to wait. Today, we’re changing all that with the launch of JUMP! Now, customers never have to worry about being stuck with the wrong phone. And, yes – it’s really as good as it sounds.”

In addition to JUMP!, T-Mobile today announced a major expansion of its 4G LTE network to reach 157 million people in 116 metro areas across the United States. The company also unveiled a program enabling families to get four phone lines with unlimited talk, text and Web and up to 500MB of high-speed data for only $100 per month – with no credit check or annual service contract required.

Today’s news builds on months of momentum since T-Mobile announced a series of bold moves in March. The announcements included dramatically simplifying its lineup of consumer rate plans to one affordable plan for unlimited talk, text and Web on a nationwide network; eliminating the need for consumers to sign annual service contracts; and enabling customers to get popular smartphones whenever they want for amazingly low upfront pricing.

Since then, market data indicates the company has nearly tripled its flow of postpaid net-new customers from AT&T and shows T-Mobile gaining more net-new customers in May than each of the other major wireless carriers in New York; Los Angeles; Houston; the San Francisco Bay Area; Miami; San Diego; and Washington, D.C.

An Easy “JUMP” to Phone Upgrades
JUMP! from T-Mobile is designed to provide customers with total protection for one of their prized possessions: their smartphones. It offers the freedom to upgrade to a new device more affordably and protects against malfunction, damage, loss or theft – all for just $10 per month, per phone (plus taxes and fees). That’s just $2 more than most customers have been paying for handset protection alone.

Beginning Sunday, July 14, customers can choose to upgrade when they want, not when they’re told with JUMP! Here’s how it works: Customers can upgrade to a new phone, financed through T-Mobile’s Equipment Installment Program (EIP), twice every 12 months after they’ve been in the JUMP! program for six months. Simply trade in an eligible T-Mobile phone in good working condition at a participating store location. Any remaining EIP payments will be eliminated, and current customers can purchase new phones for the same upfront pricing as new customers, with device financing and Simple Choice Plan, a no-annual-service contract. With JUMP!, current customers never pay more for their new phones than new customers.1

T-Mobile’s 4G LTE Network Rapidly Expanding
Having a great device means little without a fantastic network supporting it, so T-Mobile is also moving at incredible speed to make its already lightning-fast network even better and faster for customers.

Today, T-Mobile announced that its 4G LTE network now reaches 157 million people across the United States – far exceeding the company’s stated midyear goal of reaching 100 million people – and is live in 116 metropolitan areas.

Major metropolitan areas where T-Mobile’s 4G LTE network service has launched include New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago, Boston, Philadelphia, Dallas, Seattle, Atlanta, Miami, and many others. The company debuted 4G LTE less than four months ago.

T-Mobile remains on target to deliver nationwide 4G LTE network coverage by the end of the year, reaching 200 million people in more than 200 metropolitan areas.

In addition, T-Mobile’s 4G HSPA+ network service is available to 228 million people nationwide. By combining 4G HSPA+ and LTE network technologies, T-Mobile can provide customers with a strong, seamless nationwide 4G network experience.

Launching Breakthrough Family Option with No Credit Checks
T-Mobile today is also extending its Un-carrier strategy to families by addressing a huge customer headache: being denied premium family-plan rates because of less-than-premium credit.

Beginning July 14, families can get four Simple Choice Plan lines with unlimited talk, text and Web and up to 500MB of high-speed data for only $100 per month (plus taxes and fees) – no credit check and no annual service contract required.

An average of one in three consumers who apply for wireless service do not have strong enough credit to qualify for the best wireless rates, according to industry data. Other customers prefer to avoid the hassle of a credit check. As a result, these customers may forego service from a top provider or purchase several prepaid lines.

But with T-Mobile, all families can now access a great multi-line deal with no credit check. Simply put down a deposit (roughly equivalent to one month’s bill) to get the same incredible multi-line rates and network experience as other customers.

The Simple Choice Plan has been wildly popular with families since its introduction in March. About 80 percent of customers who have signed up for the plan have opted for multiple lines.

Continues to Expand 4G LTE Device Lineup
T-Mobile also is quickly growing its premium lineup of 4G LTE-capable devices. Today, the company announced pricing and availability for three new devices, bringing its portfolio to nine 4G LTE-capable smartphones. The new devices include the following:

  • Xperia® Z from Sony. T-Mobile will be the exclusive U.S. wireless company to offer Sony’s flagship water-resistant Android(TM)-powered smartphone to customers this summer.2 The Xperia Z will be available for $99.99 down, with 24 equal monthly device payments of $20 for well-qualified buyers for 0 percent APR on approved credit3 through T-Mobile retail stores and select retailers, as well as online at http://www.T-Mobile.com starting July 17. On July 16, customers can also pre-order the device online from the same website and receive a free Sony Wireless Bluetooth Speaker gift with purchase (while supplies last). Customers may also purchase the device beginning today at any of the 38 U.S. Sony Store locations, including the flagship store in New York, or online at www.Sony.com/xperiaz/tmobile and will be eligible to receive the free Sony speaker as a gift with purchase (while supplies last).
  • Nokia Lumia 925. Also starting July 17, T-Mobile’s first 4G LTE Windows Phone will be available for $49.99 down with 24 equal monthly device payments of $20 for well-qualified buyers for 0 percent APR on approved credit3 through T-Mobile retail stores and select retailers, as well as online at http://www.T-Mobile.com.
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab(TM) 2 10.1. T-Mobile will provide current Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 10.1 users with an over-the-air software update that will enable customers to take advantage of T-Mobile’s 4G LTE network in the coming weeks. Well-qualified customers may also purchase the device with the 4G LTE capability for $99.99 down with 24 equal monthly device payments of $15 for 0 percent APR on approved credit3 through T-Mobile retail stores and select retailers, as well as online at http://www.T-Mobile.com today.

JUMP! may not be available in all locations. See your sales associate at participating T-Mobile retail stores, or go to http://www.T-Mobile.com for details.

For more information, fact sheets, artwork and other collateral materials, see http://multimediacapsule.thomsonone.com/t-mobileusa/t-mobile’s-un-carrier-2-0-event.

1 Device pricing may vary based on approved credit.
2 As of Feb. 4, 2013, outside of Japan there are no smartphones with a waterproof rating higher than the Sony Xperia Z/ZL. For more information on Strategy Analytics results, go to http//:www.sonymobile.com/testresults.
3 If you cancel wireless service, remaining balance on phone becomes due. Not available in Washington, D.C.

About T-Mobile US, Inc.:
As America’s Un-carrier, T-Mobile US, Inc. (NYSE: “TMUS”) is redefining the way consumers and businesses buy wireless services through leading product and service innovation. The company’s advanced nationwide 4G and 4G LTE network delivers outstanding wireless experiences for customers who are unwilling to compromise on quality and value. Based in Bellevue, Wash., T-Mobile US operates its flagship brands, T-Mobile and MetroPCS. It currently serves approximately 43 million wireless subscribers and provides products and services through 70,000 points of distribution. For more information, please visit http://www.t-mobile.com.

  • janagggg

    @Loise, you make $27h…good for you! I make up to $85h working from home. My story is that I quit working at shoprite to work online and with a little effort I easily bring in around $45h to $85h…heres a good example of what i’m doing, http://www.Pro67.com

  • Maximus

    TMob is the girl with a big booty and pretty smile. Sure, she’s sexy. She says all the right words…but you don’t see the 5 kids, and 3 baby daddy’s that are all pyschos! Realistically, this is Rent A Center for cell phones. You pay into a program for the option to use you it. If you do, you start all over again, and your rental starts anew. If you don’t, you lost the money you put into it. It looks good for young people who don’t care to look at look past the length of their arm. It’s not what it seems tho…

  • Rodeojones000

    If only their coverage wasn’t absolute crap. If you’re not smack dab in the middle of a major metro area there’s no T-Mobile service whatsoever. Until they can match the fantastic 4G coverage and speed I get with Verizon there’s no way I’m switching.

    • NexusMan

      Forget smack dab in the middle of a major metro area…my friend lives in NYC and recently switched to T-Mo from Verizon and gets crappy and spotty service. :(

  • paul_cus

    Xperia Z is more than fashionably late to the party, but good luck Sony.

  • Cory_S

    I could have swore I heard John say on the webcast that if the device was in working order there wasn’t an upgrade fee to the new device.

  • I-Troll-U

    So you are essentially paying Approximately $300 every 6 months for a new device if you decide to upgrade every 6 months?

  • Radgatt

    So T-Mobile made the JUMP past Sprint in LTE coverage. And they started after Sprint. That is wild.

    • Diablo81588

      No. Tmobile claims to cover 116 markets, but what they don’t tell you, is very little of that market is actually covered. They count a market covered, yet its completely random as to what part of the city got upgraded. Verizon did this to a degree, but in my area, when they said Houston was covered, literally the entire city of Houston had a usable signal. It may not have been a strong signal, and indoor coverage wasn’t that great because they didn’t upgrade all towers, but you did get a signal. The suburbs of Houston was a completely different story. That didn’t come until the “expansion” phase.

  • Knlegend1

    I stopped reading after JUMP. Too bad Tmo service sucks where I’m from.

  • Tim242

    Their coverage map is a joke. They fudge it like no other carrier. Then, the brag about all of this LTE, but you have to guess where it is. They sure do t include it on their map. They lump HSPA, HSPA+ 21, HSPA+42, and LTE under 3G/4G coverage. Ugggh. I hate them.

  • WickedToby741

    At this rate it’s tempting to just get the lowest data share tier on Verizon and get that $30/mo T-Mobile plan with unlimited texting and 5 GB of high speed data. For what it costs for data on Verizon you can have a whole plan on T-Mobile.

  • Tim242

    This is not as magical as you may think. By the time you add the monthly payment and the $10 fee, you are paying Verizon plan prices.

    • SUMmaro400ex

      Yes, but you get unlimited data.And like quadruple the upgrades.

      • Diablo81588

        I have unlimited data on Verizon, so I’ll stay where I’m at. :P

        • sirmeili

          Until they decide to remove it, which they said WILL happen sooner or later. Also, I pay $120/month (after they nix my corporate discount I don’t qualify for anymore), for unlimited Text, Data and only 900 minutes and no insurance. With T-Mobile I will pay $70 for unlimited everything and then $20/month of the phone and $10 for JUMP. I’m still saving $20/month if you ask me.

          • Diablo81588

            Saving $20/month but having far less reliable coverage? Honestly, if Verizon decides to take unlimited from me, I still won’t switch. The coverage is still unmatched by any other US carrier, and I really don’t use more than 2-3 gigs of data per month. Mostly music streaming in the car. I have no use for streaming video on a 4.3″ screen, and I can’t think of any other way to use an ungodly amount of data on a phone unless you tether. I have my much faster cable internet for that at home anyway.

          • sirmeili

            luckily they just merged with Metro PCS, which here in FL has almost 100% coverage. I know it will take a time for them to merge fully, but in the end, I believe they will rival Verizon here in FL.

            That being said, in my small town, T-Mobile has pretty decent coverage and they even offer free WiFi calling if you need it. Since I work from home, I don’t really need to worry about it. I also don’t necessarily need unlimited Data, but it’s a nice option to have if I do have to travel.

          • Diablo81588

            If I remember right, they are eventually refarming Metro PCS spectrum to GSM. Only current Metro customers will connect to the CDMA network. Until all Tmobile and Metro customers are on GSM, this merger makes no difference coverage wise. Metro won’t be shut down until 2015 at the earliest, so that means they can’t upgrade to LTE on that spectrum until several years down the road.

    • PhoenixPath

      $50 for the plan, $30 for unlimited data, $20 for phone installments, $10 for protection/upgrade.

      The only difference I can see here is that the $10 is $2 less than the $12 I paid last month for the protection program.

      If I don’t upgrade, I’ll save money by doing this. If I do upgrade, it works out to $87 minus the $2 I saved over the 6 month period.

    • jnt

      True, but at least you get to switch phones all the time – if that’s your thing. It’s also a way to keep the revenue flowing into T-Mobile at a similar level to the other carriers – kind of genius on their part honestly.

    • sirmeili

      Really?

      Verizon – $120/month
      900 minutes
      unlimited Text
      unlimited Data (no longer an option and can’t keep it if you upgrade through them forcing you into their new tiered plans)
      NO Insurance

      T-Mobile – $100/month
      Unlimited Talk
      Unlimited Text
      Unlimited Data
      Plus insurance and JUMP.

      Not to mention that I only pay up to $99 for a new phone instead of $200-300 and if I keep my phone for over 24 months, my price drops by $20/month.

      And to add to THAT! I have other options for phones which could lower my monthly cost even more by $5 to 10/month (by just a cursory glance at their site).

      I don’t see how you ever could think that this comes close to Verizon plan prices. The only benefit I see verizon has is coverage, which might not be a concern for me. It’s also why I plan on “testing” t-mobile for a month before I switch.

      • Tim242

        1. Having all of that on T-Mobile isn’t that great. Their coverage is crap. Unlimited does you no good if you ever leave your house. I tried them. It was GPRS in my apt, in a 42 Mbps city.
        2. They don’t force you on the family share tiers, only the older tiers. However, you can pay out your phone and keep unlimited..
        3. There is no way you will keep a phone more than 24 months, so the price afterwards is irrelevant. You will JUMP, and keep paying Verizon prices. You can use GV for free texting and eliminate that unneccesary cost. Even if you keep it, $20 more per month is well worth knowing you have LTE almost everywhere.

        • sirmeili

          1. If you are in your house and have wifi and you aren’t connecting your phone to it, you’re doing it wrong. Second, I work from home and even now on Verizon with 4g, I keep my phone on wifi because it’s just plain better for battery life.

          2. The force me off of unlimited if I upgrade, period. I don’t care if it’s the older tiers. I can no longer get unlimited data if I upgrade my phone. Second, why would I pay for aplan with built in subsidies for the rest of my life AND pay full price for a phone just to keep unlimited data? It’s stupid and uncalled for. Let’s also not forget that it was said that eventually EVERYONE will lose unlimited data.

          3. I may not, but I’m not everyone. My mom’s phone is 4-5 years old. She would benefit from this, IMHO. Also, I can’t do MMS on GV, so it’s a moot point (and yes I like that feature). It’s not worth $20 more per month to me. Especially for 4G which when I do turn it on kills my battery. I can last for 1-2 days on my GNex using 3g and WiFi, and maybe 8 hours at best on 4g. Newer phones may be better, but I’m over it.

          IN the end, I prefer the “no contract” of it all. I may opt to not use JUMP and to just buy a phone out right and save the $10/month. As I’ve said before I will test T-Mobile in my area and see how it goes for a month then decide to move, but I have not been overly happy with Verizon and their decisions lately. I could care less about coverage if I don’t believe in the company themselves. They are greedy and I think they could care less about their customers. They expect you to go to them because of their “coverage”.

          • Tim242

            Your view on battery life on LTE is skewed, from the awful Gnex. I’ve had the Note 2, and now the S4 since the Gnex. There is no noticeable difference in battery life between WiFi and LTE. Your view on Verizon will change when you test out T-Mobile. I tried it for a month. I had to carry both phones everywhere. T-Mobile alone will leave you stranded.

          • sirmeili

            The issue is that I will be leaving Verizon for someone else. I could care less about their coverage. I’m sick over overpaying. It may not be T-Mobile, but since Metro PCS’s home state is Florida, I could move to them (who merged with T-Mobile) and get just as good coverage as Verizon (based on my GFs experience who has Metro PCS). I really like T-Mobiles direction though, so my first trial will be there before I try other options.

            I really don’t like the direction that Verizon has gone in the past year and I prefer to vote with my wallet and I vote no Verizon at this point (as well as no AT&T). I believe both have become anti customer and are just too greedy for their own good. They think they can treat you anyway they want to because of their coverage. I’m over it.

  • Travillion

    T-Mobile is, to me, a great example of a company that is actually innovating. Their need to attract more customers is driving them to do creative things that actually help the customer. Verizon, on the other hand, innovates in ways that hurt their customers, like the shared data plans that people are so wary of. “If only T-Mo had better coverage” I find myself saying for the nth time lately.

  • Justtyn Hutcheson

    T-Mobile, I like you, really, I do. The things you are doing feel amazing, and you’re only getting better.

    But, the money just isn’t working out. I’ve run the numbers, and breaking even isn’t what I need. I need to save before I can bring myself to switch. And, even with these new plans, I just can’t do it.

    I hope that, one day, things will work out between us. Until then, keep it up, and I’ll be watching.

    Sincerely,

    Heartbroken

    • Droidzilla

      Nexus. $350 for the phone, cheaper monthly, then sell the phone and buy a new Nexus when Google releases another one (you’ll be out like $100 a year for upgrades total).

      • Justtyn Hutcheson

        While tempting, the cost delta between my current Verizon plan and the equivalent TMobile plan is less than $5. I may not like Verizon as a business, but their network is huge and rock solid, so they are at least doing something right. I will need to purchase my devices at full retail or used, but I’m hoping the Moto X will be affordable, as I think that device will fit my needs perfectly if the rumors are all true. If not, I’ll probably tighten the belt a bit and hit up the HTC One. Either way, as far as I’m concerned, I’m getting my money’s worth for my service. Maybe I’ll get the HSPA version of the next Nexus 7, so I can support TMobile with that.

        • Droidzilla

          If you’re on a grandfathered, cheaper plan with Verizon, I can’t fault you for staying. I found that going with Straight Talk (on AT&T, was on T-Mobile) with home WiFi was actually cheaper than Verizon with no home WiFi (unlimited LTE ftw, until the iPhone 5 got it and the speeds tanked).

  • Hatyrei

    So what will happen to the payments you made for that 6 months/before you upgrade? Will it be forfeited ? or Credited for the purchase/upgrade of a new phone? It sounds kinda unfair if you trade in for a new phone and your back to square 1…In making payments. I’m confused. lol :P

    • Kane Desousa

      They probably start you all over.

      It’s like financing a car and trading it in for a new one, minus the monthly payment increase.

      • Hatyrei

        But if u finance a car and trade it in for a new one you will get some credits and it will be deducted to the new car’s full price + the amount you still owed.

        In this case…T-Mobile will just eliminate the remaining financed balance from your previous phone. But will not credit you for the amount you already paid(24months financed+ $10(jump/month).

        Since they require you to add $10 more for the Jump to avail an upgrade for 6 months(twice)…that would double your monthly financed payments from your old phone.

        And when the time you upgrade and trade it in to a new phone within or after 6 months. The Amount you paid for that time will not be credited back for the purchase of the said upgrade .

        Even if T-mobile will let you buy the new phone at new user price. It will be still a riff-off kinda strategy. In my opinion.

        Unless T-Mobile will announced it like for Rent Smartphones and upgrade to a new phone for +$10/month !

        sorry for being chatty. I’m just confused and kinda outrage, lol

  • jnt

    So correct me if I’m wrong, but it sounds like they worked out some deal with Asurion (by the fact that the $10 for insurance coverage also qualifies the user for Jump!). Since not everybody will use this all the time, I guess it would work?

  • Joseph Pojunis

    Hasn’t Best Buy been doing this for years with their Buy Back program?

    • Diablo81588

      Yes they have. The only difference, if I remember correctly, is that there was an upfront charge instead of a monthly fee. They offered buy back on many different products, so I’m not 100 percent sure that was the case for cell phones.

      • Joseph Pojunis

        They had it for cell phones. I was on it for a few years, and you paid $10 a month for the service. When you wanted a new phone, they’d “buy” your current one back from you, and give you 50% off of the full retail price towards your next phone.

    • jnt

      Yes but you had to have an upgrade on your line to make it worthwhile (i.e. get the new phone at a discounted price). That’s where T-Mobile’s differs – you can keep getting it at the upgrade cost. At least I think that’s how this works… lol.

  • Adam Nazare

    Call me when t-mobile gives me better data services other then .01mbps in my basement. On att i get way better service no dropped calls and better data and I never go over my cap. Plus I love my 25% discount :D

    • PhoenixPath

      …get out of the basement. :p (sorry, couldn’t resist…)

    • Diablo81588

      Hah! ATT and dropped calls go hand and hand.

      • Kane Desousa

        I’ve never had a dropped call ? lol

        • Diablo81588

          Lies?

          • Kane Desousa

            Nope, but I don’t make many phone calls.

          • Diablo81588

            Makes sense then. How can you drop a call when you don’t make any? :P

  • http://www.greenless.com Lex Lybrand

    I wish they would give the option of paying $60 to get the first upgrade so you don’t have to wait 6 months.

    • JoshGroff

      If you want to upgrade earlier, sell your phone via a 3rd party site and pay it off, thus allowing you to upgrade. Easy enough to do, and you should be able to sell the phone and pay off the remainder of the installment plan.

      • PhoenixPath

        What’s a locked HTC One selling for these days?

        • Kane Desousa

          Depending on what carrier, AT&T 475$ easy
          Tmobile idk
          Verizon… lol nuff said
          and Sprint about 430 if that since they suck

        • JoshGroff

          520-540 on swappa. The T-Mo variant that is.

          • PhoenixPath

            Dang. That’s almost what it sells for new…

    • PhoenixPath

      This. All the folks that want to upgrade *now* have to wait 6 month (as of whenever they officially let folks sign up).

    • Kane Desousa

      You can easily sell your phone on Swappa , or even have someone take over your contract and not have to pay a fee altogether. I’ve done it in the past its easy.

      • http://www.greenless.com Lex Lybrand

        I don’t have a contract, I’m on Tmobile.

        • Kane Desousa

          So you could just leave T-Mobile right now and go to another carrier if you choose to? No I doubt that. Im guessing youd have to turn the phone in , so its the SAME thing

          • http://www.greenless.com Lex Lybrand

            What? I don’t WANT to leave Tmobile. I want to skip the 6 months I would have to wait paying $10/month and just get my first upgrade now (hence, offering to pay $60 in advance).

  • JoshGroff

    99+6*30 = $279+tax

    About what you’d lose reselling the phone after 6 months of use assuming it’s in near mint condition. Take into account the insurance, and it’s well worth it if you like living on the bleeding edge of tech.

  • John Herzberg

    One tower with LTE near the airport doesn’t cover the entire Jacksonville metro area. The population number is bunk.

    • Diablo81588

      I’m beginning to think the same thing. There’s no way they’re rolling out full coverage of LTE in all these markets this fast. Lets upgrade two towers in the entire Houston area and call it covered, shall we?

      • Kane Desousa

        Lol they’re definitely piggy banking of metro towers and AT&T towers also…

  • DanSan

    wow this is pretty legit

  • Kane Desousa

    I can bet AT&T will be following suite just like T-Mobile real soon.

    • jose

      LOL.

      • Kane Desousa

        Laugh now, they’ll do it (I doubt it but one can hope)

        • jose

          No they won’t. Why should they? They don’t need to try and compete with Tmo. Completely different leagues.

          • Kane Desousa

            Well the T-Mobile fanboys think they have the best service ever now, this time last year T-Mobile was down there with Metro and Sprint, now they’re ‘The best’ Lolol

  • TeeJay1100

    Contracts…. Ain’t nobody got time for THAT!!

    Good move T-Mobile

    • Tim242

      It’s the same as having a contract

      • sirmeili

        Having a contract means I have to pay to leave. If I bring my own device to t-mobile I can leave whenever and not pay a dime. If I use the equipment installment plan, I only have to pay off my balance. I’ll agree that the later is about the same thing.

        With Verizon, however I am stuck with an ETF that at 23 months, if I need to quit, I still have to pay Verizon $120. That is just about retarded. An ETF should get closer to Zero, not $110.

  • Jackson

    Omg this is amazing

  • Jackson

    I can’t wait for the note 3 lolol

  • Jackson

    THEY WIPE THE INSTALLMENT FOR THE OLD PHONE OMG!!!!

    • Bob G

      Because it will cost the same as the new phone, so they still keep you paying money every month. Smart plan for profit disguised in a nice carrot.

  • Adam Truelove

    Oh T-mobile, why does your network have to suck so bad. You seem to be the only carrier that “cares” about your customers. And yes, I realize they only “care” because they need customers and their network isn’t going to attract anyone. But I suppose it’s better than having a sucky network and being an evil company.

    • WickedToby741

      We just need a reverse acquisition of T-Mobile by Verizon. T-Mobile’s policies and prices on Verizon’s network. #epic

  • droyd4life

    All the people dissing T-Mobile are probably locked into a contract with the Droid Charge.

    Noobs.
    #Nexus4swag

    • Tim242

      Or Tmobile’s coverage is total $hit.

      • PhoenixPath

        …or they are just very unlucky. *grin*

      • EC8CH

        which carrier do you work for again?

        • Fozzybare

          if i remember correctly….sprint?

          • Diablo81588

            I thought he worked there in the past, but now he works for..Verizon? I’ll let him answer that one lol.

      • timrcm

        Seriously, I did the prepaid thing with both the Galaxy Nexus and the Nexus 4 for about a year and a half. AT&T MVNOs all sucked (terrible customer service, shoddy network that’d go from 5 bars to no service standing under a tower, random data drops, random data throttles even with limited or no usage, etc), and T-Mobile’s coverage is abysmal the second you go a mile out of a city. If it works for you then that’s great, but it is NOT for everyone. I need my work phone to actually function when I’m traveling between our offices throughout the midwest.

    • Siege

      Just got my self out of this exact situation a month ago, and I haven’t regretted it for a second. T-Mobile has been fantastic.

    • landon

      Would love to jump, but the coverage sucks in Georgia :(

      • jose

        Basically the whole USA is like that.

      • Pedro

        Wow! Is that an informed decision to switching, and not just following the ‘T-Mobile coverage sucks!’ crowd?

        I’m another of the lucky 150+M that get a signal. Except for earlier today, while in the Moody Gardens Convention Center on Galveston Island.
        First time I’ve been there in 4 years. So that particular spot isn’t a real issue.

    • XboxOne

      The ‘Swag’ part killed your post :

  • bose301s

    It’s becoming more and more likely that come December 15th when my contract with Verizon expires that I will be jumping to T-Mobile.

    • David Wanless

      JUMPing to T-mobile! GET IT!

      • bose301s

        Completely unintentional, but I like it ;)

    • Tj Egan

      Just made the jump a week ago, and I am thoroughly pleased. Under $90 a month for my GS4 + unlimited EVERYTHING

      • KleenDroid

        I have 5 phones with unlimited data on Verizon for just under $200 a month. Two S4’s, 1 Gnex, 1 Thunderbolt, and one Incredible 2.

        Used over 40 gig of LTE data last month between them all.

        When T-Mobile can match this I will consider them. I like what I am hearing and like their new upgrade policy.

        I have no contract so I can keep my options open.

        • S2556

          Now THAT’S a good plan!

        • Diablo81588

          Corporate discounts? 5 unlimited data lines come out to 150 bucks. Last I checked, Verizon costs about 70 bucks or so for the first two lines, and 10 bucks per additional line. That works out to about 100 bucks just for the voice lines themselves. How are you doing this?

          • MK17

            Yeah, a lot of people brag because they got in for $10/mon unlimited way back when. Don’t get me wrong, I would switch if I had that either, but it’s not typical, doesn’t matter for someone who is currently shopping and doesn’t needed to be bragged about.

          • Diablo81588

            Must’ve been back in the Blackberry/Windows Mobile days. My first smartphone was android, so I guess I wasn’t lucky enough to get in on that deal :(

          • Trueblue711

            That was the old VCAST unlimited 3G data. I have no idea how it’s possible to get that on a 4G plan, if at all.

          • normmcgarry

            Droid-Life advertised a “Unlimited Family Plan” promo that Verizon did back in the OG Droid days when people with family plans started getting smartphones. They were just experimenting with it. How it worked was that you had a higher base monthly fee for the first two lines than a normal family plan, and then for $20/mo for each additional line and those lines came with data for free. I have 5 lines, 1400 minutes total, all with unlimited data, and with my corporate discount, it is like $204/mo after taxes and fees.

            It was this link:
            https://email.vzwshop.com/servlet/website/ResponseForm?OSPEUT_9_9_z_UU_0Hsr_.2eHmH_wkhthE

          • Diablo81588

            We pay about $280/month for 4 lines of data, 1400 shared minutes w/unlimited text and a 25% corporate discount. Wanna trade accounts? Ha!

          • T4rd

            Damn, I’m only paying $135/month for the same exact plan for 2 lines with a 15% military discount. How is it twice as much for two more lines when each line is only $40/month ($10/addtional line $30/data plan) more?

          • Diablo81588

            Technically I forgot to add all the charges for TEC plans and random fees. I can break it down a different way, like my bill shows.

            Data – $40/line x 3 lines, 4th line has 20% discount = $154

            Voice/TXT – 1400 shared and unlimited txt w/ 20% discount – $80

            TEC – $7 + $10 + $7 = $24

            The rest are fees and taxes. Total last month came out to $286.28.

          • Trueblue711

            Wow, I wish I knew that existed back then.

          • michael arazan

            This is the exact package my family uses with the 1400 minutes for 5 lines, 3 smartphones and 2 regular flip phones, I pay my share of $70 a month for my unlimited data and text for $30 each for my device and $10 for minutes to my step father since it is in his name. they basically pay about 180 for the other 4 devices on the plan

          • KleenDroid

            Exactly what MK17 said. I pay 10 per line for unlimited instead of 30. Its just something everyone on droid life got a while back.

            No its not the norm and I would be gone if I paid full price.

        • Tj Egan

          Well I mean, I’ve gone through 5 GB in a little under 2 weeks, by myself. I was on Verizon and the speeds on T-Mobile are only slightly slower in my area. If I were to join Verizon by myself it would cost me over $120 and I would only get 2GB of data. Can’t compare new plans to a grandfathered plan

        • Mark Mann

          we have two text phones and two smart phones and pay almost 200 a month for unlimited data and 700 minutes a month…how are you doing this?

          • KleenDroid

            I got the deal they had here on Droid Life a couple years ago where I got unlimited data on each line for $10 a month instead of 30. So I get a $20 per line discount each month.

          • Mark Mann

            i see…well kudos to you :)

        • Droidzilla

          This is like an old fart talking about how they bought a house in California on the beach for $50,000. It’s great for you, but simply not relevant to the current discourse.

          • KleenDroid

            Lol

    • PhoenixPath

      Sounds too good to be true from what I have been reading…

      Currently have a One through them on the installment plan. Paid $99 for it, and pay $20 plus a $12 “protection” fee.

      From the sounds of it, that $12 is dropping to $10 and I’m getting a “new” upgrade every 6 months on top of it.

      I’ve *got* to be missing something…either that or T-Mobile just made my jump to them *way* more of a good thing.

      • JoshGroff

        Looks like it, lol.

        • JetRanger

          Same here. Just did this with a GS$ .. This is sweet!

      • Kayak83

        “Jump” is T-Mobile’s way of keeping you financially committed on a monthly basis to a device forever as you’re with them. They also get to sell the used phones back to their customers and recoup the “loss.” It’s going to be very lucrative for them if and when their customers opt-in.

        So:
        Pay $99 up front for a new phone. Add $20/month for the device payments. Wait 6 months, pay $99 for new phone and continue the $20/month payments. All while adding the $10 entry fee/month on top of your data/voice plan cost.

        *Assume you keep the phone you paid $99 up front for and have been paying $20/month for 6 months. That’s $219 (w/out tax) after 6 months (assuming the 6 month upgrade cycle they want you to get into). Traditionally on other carriers after 2 years you paid $250-$300 up front for that new subsidized phone and that was it. If T-Mobile has their way, you’re going to spend more money more often on new devices you WANT.

        The carrot here is that you’re finally at least getting the OPTION to upgrade at the lower entry cost than having to traditionally wait for your contract cycle and be stuck.

        I’ve always carried the TEC insurance through Verizon, so the big deal about not having to stick with a half-broken phone for the life of my contract doesn’t resonate with me as a great new deal.

        • PhoenixPath

          “Pay $99 up front for a new phone. Add $20/month for the device payments. Wait 6 months, pay $99 for new phone and continue the $20/month payments. All while adding the $10 entry fee/month on top of your data/voice plan cost.”

          …which is $2 less a month than I am paying now (if I understand correctly and that $10 takes the place of the current “protection” plans as stated in the articles).

          That $99 only comes into play if I upgrade. If I choose not to, I save $24 a year.

          • Kayak83

            I like the low up front cost and the OPTION to upgrade whenever but the $20/month payment forever adds up in the long run. In this case a crappy contract actually forces you to save money by not having to throw money at them every month for the newest thing.

          • PhoenixPath

            That “option”, if not exercised, leaves you with a savings and that $20 drops off after 24 months. :)

            …and if you simply *must* have that new phone? no problem….

            I dunno. From the looks of it so far, I really like it. We’ll see though. I am sure there’s got to be some larger catch.

          • Justtyn Hutcheson

            I don’t see a catch, but I also don’t think people are running the math correctly. It all comes down to cost delta and net gains versus net losses. If you exercise the upgrade option, there’s every possibility you could lose money over 24 months. Even if you don’t exercise the upgrade option, you still pay an equivalent amount that you would on another carrier for the same device, it is simply clearer what money goes where.

            Please see my example above for cost savings if you don’t exercise the upgrade option, or only exercise it for “0 down” devices. For flagships, the cost delta goes up to ~$12.50 if you don’t exercise you upgrade option at all, to ~$25 if you exercise your upgrade option at every opportunity (maximum of 3 times over a 24 month period). Again, if the cost delta between your current plan and T-Mobile’s monthly plan is < $10-$25, you will lose money on T-Mobile over time.

          • PhoenixPath

            Currently using t mobile… Cissy savings is much easier to calculate as such.

            Jumped VZW due to cost and service, and the other two are just not options so comparing to other providers (in the context of my original post) is pointless. :-)

            I hope the may helped others though, so thanks!

          • sirmeili

            “I like the low up front cost and the OPTION to upgrade whenever but the $20/month payment forever adds up in the long run”

            But with everyone else you are paying that $20/month anyways by paying the subsidies which they never stop charging you for even after your contract is up. So basically, instead of paying $200-300 for a top tier phone plus rolled in subsidies, you are paying $99 once (or every time you upgrade) and $20/month for up to 24 months after each upgrade. Find a phone you like and keep it for 30 months? You stop paying that $20/month 24 months in (as if you purchased the phone outright). Verizon and AT&T don’t do this. They continually charge you the subsidies.

            So with Verizon I paid $175 for my GNex (on sale and newer phones are up to $250-300 I think) and I pay their subsidies. Let’s say it’s $10-20/month. Over 24 months I paid $415-655 for that device with no option to upgrade until the 24 months was up (unless I wanted to pay full price for a new device). With T-Mobile I might pay as much as $99 up front and $20/month which would be $579 over the 24 months. About the same cost. I don’t know What the subsidy costs are for Verizon or AT&T, but I would guess it is up there so that over 24 months you pay for the device in full ($500-650). In this case T-Mobile is no different than your current plan except taht after 24 months your bill drops.

            Also with T-Mobile I can choose a cheaper device and pay a lower up front cost and lower per month costs as well. Even if I have a $20/month phone now and I fall into financial trouble, I might b e able to trade in my phone for a 0 down and $10-15/month phone and save that money per month and it costs me nothing to do it! And when I’m back on my feet I can go and trade it in again., All for less/month than my current verizon plan ($120/month for unlimited text/data and 900 minutes of talk).

            I don’t see how this is anything but Win/Win for T-Mobile and it’s customers.

          • Kayak83

            You’re not paying a monthly subsidy fee on Verizon. You’re just contracted for two years. Plus, typically I’m able to sell my phone for $100 or so once I do upgrade.

            I know I sound super pro-Verizon here…not my intention. Just sorting through the catches for these carrier plans.

          • sirmeili

            If you think that verizon has not rolled in some kind of subsidy into your plan cost, you’re blind. Verizon can’t sell you a $650 phone for $200-300 and not make the rest of it. You pay for it by paying extra costs in your plan. It’s a very common practice as most US carriers do it. It’s how they made phones affordable.

          • Kayak83

            Absolutely. But the issue was that it’s not an extra monthly fee I’m being charged on Verizon. T-Mobile calls it transparency by simply adding the amount monthly. Either way it’s costing customers, just a matter of how.

            Comparing a 24/month contract cost on 1 phone.

            T-mobile: $99 up front + $20/month payment + $10/month for jump x 24 months = $579

            Verizon: $250-$300 up front. Sell later if I want to cover some cost of the next renewal device cost. Just sold my Incredible 2 for $90 to go towards my Note 2, for example.

          • sirmeili

            And yet on T-Mobile you could keep your phone for 24 months and sell it as well without issue, so that is a moot point. And yet you’re leaving out that even if you are paying that fee, you still pay more on Verizon. Not to mention that monthly fee on T-Mobile can change depending on your phone of choice. I saw some as low as $0 down and $10/month. Not the best devices, but I just saved $10/month on my plan fee. You can’t do that on Verizon. If you get the free phone or the $300 phone, you still pay the same every month regardless. I don’t like that.

          • Justtyn Hutcheson

            For argument’s sake, if you get a free device on Verizon (typically the same quality as the 10/mo T-Mobile devices), you are “saving” any up-front or monthly cost, and only pay for your service. If the cost delta between your plan and a comparable T-Mobile plan is $10 to be a net gain.

          • Justtyn Hutcheson

            Resale is where I’m seeing the value-add for not doing JUMP. With JUMP, the device goes back to T-Mobile, and you get a new one.

            This sounds suspiciously like vehicle leasing programs, low cost, but at the end of it you are doing nothing more than renting your device. You never really own it, and you can’t recoup any of the cost.

          • noc007

            Or you can opt to not do the program and sell your used one after 6-12 months and you’ll probably loose less money.

          • Justtyn Hutcheson

            Against what you are paying now, yes, you are correct. If you opt-in during their intro period (will likely get an email notification of when that will take place), you will save $2/mo/device. Also, we are assuming you purchase new flagship devices, not refurb devices, which will change the dynamic as well.

            The TL;DR is: some people will save some money with these plans vs. buying new full price, and it will likely give T-Mobile a large stock of refurb devices for people who don’t mind waiting ~6 months behind the “new” device cycle

          • PhoenixPath

            Dang, everyone wins. Both the “gotta have it now” and the wait-n-see.

            Still think I’ll want to hold onto the One for a while. We’ll see what’s coming in 6 months though. :)

          • Justtyn Hutcheson

            Everyone on T-Mobile wins. Whether this is a good deal for anyone not already on T-Mobile is subjective. That was all I was really getting at with my first reply.

      • Justtyn Hutcheson

        You are missing something. You have to pay the up-front cost for each upgrade. If that is $100/ea (flagship device), then you are paying $100 x 2 + $30 x 12 = $560/yr.

        If you are on say Verizon, and pay $650 x 2, that’s $1300. But if you sell your 6-month-old flagship for $375 (easy so long as you take care of it), you have $1300-$750 = $550/yr.

        That’s just a comparison of device cost per year, of course, and doesn’t take into account the difference in service cost, which must be weighed against the service quality in your particular area, and the areas you visit often.

        • PhoenixPath

          1.) If I choose not to upgrade at all, it costs me $2 less a month.

          2.) I am not on Verizon, so those stats are moot.’

          Quality of service in my area (one of the lucky few, apparently) is with T-Mobile. Solidly.

          Looks like win-win to me so far. We’ll see as more details emerge…

    • noc007

      If you’ve got grandfathered data, you can sell the line and still be able to port your number over before your contract is up.

      • Bigwavedave25

        Sell the line? What do you mean by this?

        • noc007

          There’s something called Assumption of Liability (AoL). It’s intended as a way for someone to take their number and contract and separate it from another account. A couple of examples are taking one’s number from a coporate account when leaving an employer or in a divorce.

          For what I’m talking about, one would sell the grandfathered plan on Ebay or other medium and use the AoL process to transfer the line to the new owner. They would need to pass VZW’s credit check though.

          Even though VZW CS says it’s not possible, it is possible to port your number out and still maintain the grandfathered line. The best way is to start new service with a carrier, sit in front of your computer, call up the new carrier and have them port the number, wait 10-15min, call out on the new phone to see if the number port has been initiated, go into your VZW account and request a new number. Inbound calls will not work for a few hours while the port is going on. The next day after the port completes, the VZW line can be suspended so it’s not billed for unused service while a new owner is found.

          There are articles on using Google Voice as a intermediary and paying $20, but I did the straight port mentioned above on two lines (done on different days) without an issue.

          • Bigwavedave25

            Wow, thanks for the info.
            You mentioned Google Voice, something I would love to do before getting a local number is port my existing over to GVoice so I do not loose contacts who only have that one. But as you mentioned, all I am getting from Vz is that it would mean the termination of the transferring line (which is still on unlimited data)… :-/

    • T4rd

      I have a feeling many Gnex owners such as yourself are going to leave. I have the same ETF, but I used a third line to get my Note 2 after a year. I think I’ll stick with Verizon at least until T-Mobile get LTE or HSPA+ in my area, which probably will still be a long time since Verizon hasn’t even deployed LTE in my town yet (I have it at work and everywhere else though).

  • jose

    I guess when your network coverage blows really hard, you pretty much need to give stuff away. I can see the execs at ATT and Verizon LOLing at this.

    • Alan Fortte

      Someone at CNET reported that they’re getting really fast LTE speeds in San Fran. FYI the LTE just turned on in a lot more cities, about 40-55 minutes ago.

    • Christian

      Not denying that VZW is fast for you, but in my area I’m lucky to get 1Mbps down on LTE with excellent cell reception. So at least where I live, T-Mobile would be a huge upgrade over Verizon right now…just have to play the waiting game.

      • Adam Truelove

        It’s not so much the speed on Verizon (which is often slower than AT&T in many populated areas), it’s the coverage. You may not get lightning speeds all the time, but you will get a signal.

        • PhoenixPath

          …or it’ll constantly drop calls and data.

          (Ya know, like it did on my VZW Galaxy Nexus and LG Spectrum every day back and forth from work.)

          T-mobile is actually more reliable here. VZW has really gone downhill in MN lately.

          • Diablo81588

            Funny, in the Houston area I haven’t dropped a single call in the 5 years since I switched back to Verizon. Don’t even know what the dropped call message looks like!

          • PhoenixPath

            No message…just a beep and it’s gone (unless I’m just to slow to catch an on-screen message).

            Happened daily on my drive to work here. Slightly frustrating to say the least. It’s probably the main reason I take any “coverage is awesome/sucks!” statement with a gigantic grain of salt.

            VZW has always been boasted as “The Best” and T-Mob one of, if not “The Worst”…and my experiences in the last 6 months have been completely opposite.

          • Diablo81588

            From what I can remember from my friends ATT android phone, its a pop up message, similar to the “*Random program* has been granted superuser permissions”, but says “Call lost”. I believe its called a toast message, but I’m not too sure.

          • PhoenixPath

            Now that you mention it, I am pretty sure you’re right. I may have caught it once. Doesn’t last long (if it appears at all).

            I just remember the beep as being one of the most annoying and frustrating sounds in the universe. I should set my alarm to make that sound….i’d wake in a cold sweat for sure.

          • Diablo81588

            Its very brief for sure.

          • jose

            That’s because you had a Gnex. I can’t remember the last time I dropped a call or last data, aside from the 2 weeks I owned that phone.

          • PhoenixPath

            Read my post again, joe…it wasn’t just the gnex.

            FWIWll it happened on my Fascinate before then as well. VZW has really gotten unreliable in this area…most likely due to congestion. Hopefully their working on it, but for now, T-Mob it is.

          • Fozzybare

            verizon is wonderful for me…other than inside my work…and out front of work…but to the side of work it is fine.

          • PhoenixPath

            *laughs*

            Sorry, that struck me as amusing. Almost like saying, “It works great! (Except for the 2/3rds of the places it doesn’t…)”

            Voted up for making me chuckle.

          • Mallahet

            Agree to that. Verizon “coverage” has been horrible here for the past year. Can’t get over 1Mbps down in downtown Minneapolis. I get around 3Mbps in South Minneapolis..

          • PhoenixPath

            It was killing me. Every time I saw someone post about VZW’s amazing coverage I shuddered.

            …now I just laugh. It might just be amazing…somewhere else.

          • Mallahet

            I’m looking to jump to T-Mo or prepaid when my contract is up. I have a buddy on Straight Talk who says it’s fine, but not as good as his old AT&T. I’m thinking of trying out T-Mobile. And if that doesn’t work, there are options! Friggin’ CDMA can go die.

          • Fozzybare

            like i said i like it everywhere except my work. get plenty of em bees down

      • jose

        I’ve checked their maps. The coverage is listed as MEH in my neighborhood. Plus, we also do a lot of offroad/camping trips into the forest. Verizon’s service extends FAR out into the middle of nowhere, much farther than other carriers.

        And you can’t beat the speeds…

        • Eric

          The reason why I’m with Verizon. T-Mobile provides excellent service in my city but I occasionally go out to the boonies and the TMo coverage is non-existant. I still envy TMo customers for their JUMP plan.

        • Guest

          T-Mobile’s LTE doesn’t look too bad…

        • gambit07

          HAHA! You’re kidding me with those speeds! That’s on verizon?? Here is my speedtest with VZW in Michigan, abysmal. It’s what 3g used to be. I wonder if your device has any effect on these speeds? Can’t be too much though since I used to get around 10mbit when I first got the phone 1.5 years ago. I tested tmobile and the speeds for LTE were in the 20-30 range, but data coverage was not nearly as consistent as verizon.

          • jose

            HAHA that’s LTE? What? How? But why??? Yeah, you better JUMP to T-Mobile

          • Kane Desousa

            Lol holy crap, glad I left Verizon for AT&T.

            But Verizon is doing a lot of upgrades so it’ll get better

          • Diablo81588

            Tmobile has virtually zero load on their LTE towers. Only 20-30mbps on a brand new LTE network is pathetic. I was getting 50mbps on average when VZ’s LTE network was new..

          • Kane Desousa

            You hit the nail on the head. I had 50mbps easy when I had them and they rolled out LTE in my area

          • Viva Movil

            Where’s the LTE logo next to your 4G?

          • Fozzybare

            rom’d and themed im guessing. i like having just the 4g show up on my phones.

          • gambit07

            AFAIK the verizon Galaxy Nexus never had the LTE symbol, just 4G

        • Steve Benson

          Is this a joke? The fastest I’ve ever gotten with a Verizon speedtest was about 12mbps down. Verizon is so sporadic, hate em. I’m supposedly in a very strong Verizon footprint in the DC area too.

          • Diablo81588

            Entirely due to population and the load on the cell tower. Isn’t that obvious though?

          • gambit07

            It is obvious, but unfortunate that Verizon has such an unsatisfactory budget for total bandwidth in an area “covered” by lte

          • Diablo81588

            I think a lot of it has to do with the fact they don’t throttle LTE. Throttling gives you a more consistent speed across the board. Tmobile just recently stopped throttling, and ATT still throttles unlimited data lines after 3 gigs. Sprint has never throttled, but look how terrible their service is.

          • Detonation

            Nope, I can get 40/20 with strong signal in the right area. I’d say my average is closer to 20 now though, but it all depends on network congestion. Right when LTE hit my city and no one really had 4G devices I would get 40+ all the time.

          • shanecurren

            I have to agree. I’ve had an LTE device on Verizon since the Thunderbolt. Speeds started around 40 down. Now, it is usually around 20-25 down and 5 up. I just tried it on an iPhone 5 with iOS 7 Beta 3 and got 1.53 down and 0.05 up…

          • jose

            Just did a new test a few minutes ago…26/8. That’s what I typically see. Sometimes it goes into the 40s

          • Tim242

            You wanna see sporadic? Try Tmo. You get HSPA, HSPA+, EDGE, and GPRS, depending on which way you turn your head

        • chris420o

          yeah i wish…i literally speed test on my way to work down in lower westcheter near the bronx in ny and i got 3-4mg download with full 4g lte bars…what a joke

        • Alan Fortte
          • Diablo81588

            Dude that’s horrible for a brand new network…. Just wait until they get an actual load on their towers!

          • Kane Desousa

            EXACTLY, T-Mobile is “fast” because there are like 20 customers using their LTE in one area.

          • Alan Fortte

            Did I say it was good…? Results do vary between cities and this network launched literally an hour or so ago.

          • gambit07

            Maybe so, but like I said HSPA+ was still faster than verizons LTE

        • Alan Fortte

          LOL at the upload speeds, though.

      • Christian

        Totally agree with both of you guys, but once again it’s a huge example of case-by-case reliability. Jose, if I had those speeds I wouldn’t even think of leaving Verizon. Unfortunately, I’m getting about 2Mbps down and 3Mbps up right now with 4 bars of LTE :/ I recruited my girlfriend (who has T-Mobile) to help me test out the coverage around here, and it turns out they are just as good as Verizon.

        P.S. I live in Pittsburgh, and I don’t think the hilly terrain helps any wireless carrier, but Verizon has really forgotten about us as far as placing more towers and upgrading the network goes. Verizon still has more coverage FAR outside the city, but luckily I’m a city slicker so it doesn’t matter much for me.

        • beerme828

          I too am in pittsburgh. 20down, 10up for the past month when LTE showed up. Couldn’t be happier with tmobile after ditching VZW 2 months ago.

          • Christian

            Thanks for the info, it’s good to know! Is LTE coverage in Pittsburgh widespread yet? Or just downtown?

          • beerme828

            I’m getting it up in Ross, down in Robinson, and as far east as homestead… havent tried too much further, but that’s because I rarely head further outside the city. So, for me, Tmobile has been awesome!

          • Christian

            Sounds great, glad to hear it! If you’re getting it in Ross and Robinson then I’ll probably be mostly covered. When my contract ends in the fall I think I’ll be making the switch. Thanks again for the info!

  • LiterofCola

    What ever happened to the Xperia Z “Google Edition”?….Still would love that phone.

    • Kane Desousa

      Was it even ever officially confirmed

      • LiterofCola

        Naaah, was just rumored. Still would have jumped to ATT for that beauty.

  • Alan Fortte

    This is a win, also because protection is included. Now all T-Mobile needs is the Galaxy Note 3 and it’ll attract a lot more people.

    • @GoogleGoliath

      Any chance for a developer edition for the Note 3?

      • Alan Fortte

        It’s likely since the S4 came out as a DE phone too.

    • Jarred Sutherland

      Not really .. they need to fix their huge EDGE gaps. I would LOVE to stick with T-Mobile, but I have service that is just far too unrelilable and slow in my area.

      • Kane Desousa

        I remember when I had them, one block I had 4g and the next I had EDGE…. incredibly slow

        • Alan Fortte

          I live next to a park (Sprint) and I have insanely sh!tty signal and slow 3G. Constant dropped calls and my texts take forever to go out. My mom has Simple Mobile which runs on T-Mobile’s towers, and she always has 3 bars or more.

  • SmokeNMirrors

    Too bad it’s T-Mobile…