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LG Optimus G2 Showing Up at CES With Snapdragon S4 Prime Processor and 1080p Display?

LG Optimus G Sprint

LG introduced the Optimus G back in November, but before the paint could even dry, its successor was already being rumored as the Optimus G2. With a 5.5″ 1080p display and new Snapdragon S4 “Prime” processor, the MSM8974 (quad-core with speeds of 2.0 – 2.5GHz), it’s certainly a step up on the spec front. The original rumor for this phone pegged it for a May 2013 release, but famed rumor monger DigiTimes thinks that LG will show it off at CES, next week. This matches up to a report out of GSMArena last week

The move makes sense for LG, even if they just released the Optimus G and Nexus 4 within the last couple of months. 1080p is going to be the standard in 2013, something we are already seeing evidence from with companies like Huawei and ZTE. Both companies are expected to show off 1080p phones next week, so if LG wants to continue to try to come back in the smartphone industry, they better get a phone ready with the latest and greatest specs. And let’s not forget that HTC already has a 1080p phone out and is planning to launch more, if rumors are true.

The good news is that we’ll know in a matter of days. LG has a CES press event on Monday at 8AM.

Via:  DigiTimes | GSMArena

  • Tim

    My wife would love this. I’m amazed how popular these phablets are with women.

    • kixofmyg0t

      Who woulda thought women would enjoy things bigger than 4″?

      Ba-duh-tsss!

  • Butters619

    so htc, lg, huawei, and zte are showing off phones at CES…

    ….and how are those 4 companies doing here in the states?

  • http://twitter.com/jeffaye Jeff Ayers

    Everyone needs to stop complaining about the size of phones until you use one for a week. My Note II does not feel large at all. It is by far the most natural feeling phone I have ever used. Everything isn’t tiny and cramped. Trust me, a week using a 5.5 inch device and you will never want a smaller one.

    • brando56894

      I’ve played with the note before and it definitely is a lot bigger than the Rezound and Galaxy Nexus that I have, but I feel it’s something I could easily get used to. I love the size of my N7 so a screen that’s 1.5″ smaller shouldn’t really be any different, but then again at that rate do I even need a 7″ tablet? lol

  • mustbepbs

    Quad Core 2.0-2.5 processor with monster GPU? Check.
    2 GB RAM? Check.
    Jelly Bean? Check.

    LG Skin causing the system to lag? Check.

    • Androidfan

      have you even tried the new UI? its faster and more responsive than touchwiz or motoblur

      • http://thebeeobee.com/ thebeeobee

        LOL motoblur is barely there anymore. Not sure how you figure that any skin is faster than motoblur at this point.

        • chris125

          Sadly blur still lags. The razr hd hopefully moto can figure it out because it should not lag especially being so close to stock. Maybe lack of ram is what does it

          • http://twitter.com/Bateluer Robert Boluyt

            I can second this on my Razr HD MAXX. Its an extremely light skin, when compared to TouchWiz, Sense, or LG Home, but some how manages to lag. No idea why, since my stock GNex and N7 are lag free. Even my Asus TF700 is virtually lag free. Nova Launcher runs fine, just wish the Circles widget worked with it.

          • yarrellray

            it lags because it is not lighter or faster than the Nature UI of the Galaxy S3 or Galaxy Note 2. You guys are fooling yourself.

          • squiddy20

            It takes up less storage and has less crap thrown in it. How’s that not “lighter” you moron? You’re the one who’s fooling yourself. You so delusional that you actually believe that whatever phone you currently own is “the best on the market”. You even said that of your “legendary” Evo 3D, which was pulled from shelves after not even 9 months.

          • Hilo Yang

            Calm your ass down.

      • yarrellray

        faster and more responsive than the nature UI of Samsung….VERY VERY DOUBTFUL my friend. Currently nothing on the market is faster and more responsive from a skinned android standpoint than the current Nature UI on the Galaxy S3 and Galaxy Note 2.

    • http://www.facebook.com/metalmatze1234 Along Came Morgi

      why you comment if you have no idea? just to hate? LG UI 3.0 is running damn smooth on the optimus G, better than droid dna for example, tho its still on ICS. no lags ever. hate people hating just to get a thumb up

      • michael arazan

        People hating because LG has left a bad taste in their mouth from previous flawed phones and software giving them horrible experiences.

        • http://www.facebook.com/metalmatze1234 Along Came Morgi

          i know, i own the 2x and it frustrated me alot. still its just not true what he is saying. he is simply lying to get a thumb up or be funny or dont know, but i think even LG as a company deserves more than one chance

      • brando56894

        I tried the Optimus G in the AT&T store a week or so ago and the thing was an absolute beast, I can’t even imagine what the performance of this thing will be like. I’m salivating over the rumored CPU already!

  • Meister_Li

    Too bad those will come with LG’s locked bootloader again. Oh well, I am sure HTC, Samsung and Sony will have similar phones on offer that give their customers the freedom they payed for.

    • Danrarbc

      HTC’s bootloader is locked too, and you can’t officially go S-Off. The Optimus G is beginning to be unlocked too.

  • OnlyNexus

    Screen: 5.5″, 1080p
    Battery life: 10 Min.

    • T4rd

      Eh, maybe not. Depends on the battery size; the Note 2 is the same size and has an older/less power efficient SoC in it, but rivals the Maxx HD in battery life due to its 3100 mAh battery. The S4 Prime (A15 based) would prolly use less power driving that 1080p display than the Exynos 4412 (A9 based) driving its 720p display. LG would be stupid not to put a 3000+ mAh battery in this thing since it’s large enough to accommodate one.

      • http://twitter.com/tanujrocks Tanuj Chokshi

        i have a feeling they wont include a 3000+ mAh battery… idk why i think the droid dna has a <3000+ mAh battery. i hope they put a bigger battery in it though!

      • OnlyNexus

        That’s true, and I am being dramatic. Just venting frustration that battery tech is the slowest to evolve.

        • Captain_Doug

          Can’t wait for silicon batteries.

      • snapdragonFan

        S4 Prime isn’t A15 based, none of Qualcomms processors are A15 or A9 based. They are all designed from ground up using the ARM architecture spec. Any relation to A9/A15 is standard processor design techniques used to improve performance

        • http://twitter.com/Bateluer Robert Boluyt

          Upvote. Everyone always seems to forget this.

          • Captain_Doug

            I did. Shameful.

        • T4rd

          I knew it wasn’t a direct derivative of the A15, but I know they share similar design and architecture. I knew I should have put “inb4 S4 isn’t A15″ in there =p.

      • Dave

        My GN2 punishes the Razr Maxx when you declare screen time as most important. This is with 32% left. I’ve run it near 10 hours, but passed out and the battery was dead in the morning before I could do a screen shot. I actually felt dirty using my phone that much in a day.

        • T4rd

          I said Razr Maxx HD, which gets considerably better battery life than the original Razr Maxx. I consistently get 8-10 hours of screen-on time with my Note 2 too.

    • Lactose_the_Intolerant

      sad but probably true for the HTC offerings >.<

  • Jim McClain

    its so big its meant only for those that carry a purse

  • ChrisI

    5.5″ display? Is this where we’re heading, carrying laptops as phones? I’m so ready for any mftr to put out a 4.5″ 1080p, 2gb RAM, 32gb internal + SD card slot, physical QWERTY, and unlocked bootloader. These 5.5″ devices are nuts, I don’t see how people crry these things everywhere.

    • Tim242

      The Note II fits in my back pocket, with room to spare.

      • BSweetness

        Every person who has commented on my Note 2 has asked about it fitting in my pocket. I then proceed to show them how easily it fits in one of the side pockets of my pants (all kinds of pants ranging from slimmer dress pants to regular fit jeans). If I know the person, I then offer them the chance to try it in their pocket, and they’re always amazed by how easily it fits and how unobtrusive it feels. And this is with a slim TPU case on it.

        • Tim242

          Ha I do the same. Which case do you use? I’ve looked at several TPU’s. Can’t decide which one I want.

          • BSweetness

            Diztronic matte black. I’ve had one for my last four phones. I didn’t used to like TPU cases (and I still don’t like most), but the fit and more importantly the feel of this one changed my mind completely about how nice they can be if done right.

          • Tim242

            Thanks! About to order. It looks nice, and only $12.50.

          • Dave

            Does it still slide into the pocket smoothly or does the grip get stuck? I’m a delivery guy bending, climbing, and moving all day, I want one that can move a little in my pocket. Got a link to it? Thanks.

          • BSweetness

            Yes, it slides into a pocket very smoothly. It’s not your typical grippy TPU material on the back. It’s a soft touch matte material that doesn’t attract lint, slides in and out of a pocket easily, and it feels great in hand. That material is the reason why I like it – it doesn’t feel like a TPU case at all. It has a much more quality feel to it.

            Links like that sometimes get posts deleted, so just search for it on Amazon (“Diztronic Note 2 matte”). It’s the first result that pops up.

          • Dave

            Thanks me too. I can sell the free one Samsung is sending me from that offer last week with 6 free TecTiles

      • ChrisI

        You’re missing my point. At what size do they stop increasing? What happens when we have 6″ and 7″ phones to choose from and that’s it? And when you have it in your back pocket, and go to sit down at work, or on a bus, or public transport, or the table for dinner, you have to constantly be conscious of taking it out. It’s not a wallet, you can’t crush it. IMO, mftr’s failed immensely when they invested in larger screen sizes BEFORE battery tech. If the MAXX HD can do it, why can’t all the other co’s made bigger, better batt’s? At the end of the day, I’d like my phone to be a phone, not a mini laptop. That Padfone 2 is just what I’m looking for.

        • BSweetness

          “What happens when we have 6″ and 7″ phones to choose from and that’s it?”

          6″ and 7″ phones will never be the only options. That’s just laughable to even think. There are far more sub 5″ phones out there right now than there are phones that are greater than 5″. And they’ll stop increasing the size when people stop buying the larger devices. Clearly there’s a market for them, because they’re selling quite well.

          I know this is a story about the rumored G2, but you seem to be lumping all large screen devices into a single category. You’re overlooking the major strides made by the Note 2. It’s really set the bar for large screen phones.

          Maybe you missed my post above, but I keep my Note 2 in the regular side pocket of my pants (I’d never carry it in my back pocket since that’s just asking for trouble if you forget that it’s there). It fits just fine in dress pants and in regular fit jeans (and I’m no giant – 5′ 11″, 160lbs). Everyone who holds my Note 2 is always amazed when they try putting it in their pocket and see how easily it fits. Pocketability will get more difficult when they start pushing beyond the overall size of the Note 2, but a thin 5.5″ device fits just fine.

          As for the battery, I guess you haven’t really looked at the Note 2 that much. It’s been universally praised for its battery life. The Note 2 has a 3100mAh battery. The MAXX HD has a 3300mAh. That’s a minor difference of only 200mAh. The battery life on my Note 2 rivals the battery life that my 3300mAh MAXX had. Samsung definitely stepped up the battery for the Note 2. Not to mention that the battery on the Note 2 is removable (whereas with the MAXX HD, you’re tied to a charger if the battery dies, and believe me, the battery on my MAXX died many times before the day was through). Other OEMs definitely need to follow Motorola’s and Samsung’s lead here, especially LG and HTC who are using non-removable batteries.

          At the end of the day, the Note 2 is very much a phone for me. After a short time using it, it feels perfectly normal. It doesn’t really feel big at all. Is it for everyone? Of course not. No phone is for everyone, and thankfully Android provides a lot of different choices. Large screen phones are popular right now, and we’ll continue to see several of them. But that doesn’t mean devices with smaller screens will disappear.

        • Tim242

          Any size phone has to be removed from my pocket to comfortably sit. That inconvenience is the price we pay to have an always on connected computer at all times.

    • LionStone

      Naturally they will come back down in sizes, they have no more room to go up while creeping up on the 7″ tablet. We’ll have more choices too when they come back down…I hope so anyway :-)

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=716789798 Lonnie Kerchief

    That’s not a large phone, it’s a small tablet.

  • T4rd

    Too bad Verizon prolly won’t get it and if they do, they will ruin it somehow with lower specs and no expandable battery/storage like they did the DNA (11 GBs FTL). More reason to leave them, I guess. I’m glad I got the Note 2 w/ unlimited data though, otherwise I would have left them. I threw CleanROM 3.5 on it and it’s just like the international Note 2 and more B-).

    • http://twitter.com/tanujrocks Tanuj Chokshi

      did you end up paying full retail in order to keep unlimited data?

      • http://www.facebook.com/SushiHuntr Byron Harley

        i kept unlimited by upgrading one of my nondata lines… as long as I do not upgrade my unlimited line I will keep it until I upgrade the unlimited line

        • Captain_Doug

          Good idea.

      • T4rd

        No, I did exactly what Byron did below me. I had someone else on my account and took their upgrade (my mom; she’ll keep her iPhone 4 til it breaks).

    • http://www.facebook.com/SushiHuntr Byron Harley

      the DNA has about 13GB once you get rid of the VZW bloat crap… if verizon would produce decent products that we would actually use then they woudn’t be forced to preinstall and not let us remove the garbage… lucky we have root and kernels with /system write capability now so the phone is great

      • T4rd

        13 GBs is still garbage though, compared to the Note 2′s potential 75+ (usable) GBs.

    • Booyah

      How did you swing keeping unlimited at this point? Pay full price?

      *edit: didn’t read below. My bad.

    • yarrellray

      Verizon is the BIGGEST JOKE with all their customization’s and internal changes to devices. I wouldn’t touch that carrier with a ten foot pole even if you paid my bill for free monthly. Verizon sucks monkey balls

      • squiddy20

        And yet you had a Galaxy Nexus with them not even 7 months ago, and got kicked off their network because you couldn’t pay their high monthly fee.

  • Captain_Doug

    Qualcomm just needs to get to A15 already and give the 5250 a challenge. Besides, there are way more S4′s than there should be.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snapdragon_(system_on_chip)#Snapdragon_S4

    • snapdragonFan

      Won’t happen since Qualcomm designs their chips from the ground up. See my post above.

      • Captain_Doug

        Regardless, they’re going to fall behind unless they release a new chip. The krait chip blew the A9′s out of the water but it won’t last long against A15′s if Qualcomm just going to overclock their old CPU’s.

        • snapdragonFan

          I can assure you they are not just overclocking their old CPU’s. Most if not all of the S3/S4 designs have architectural performance improvements and frequency performance improvements from release to release, the only exceptions would be designs repackaged with slightly different features.

          • Captain_Doug

            Hence the play/pro/prime? It doesn’t make sense otherwise to release a Krait CPU and then release another named the same thing yet slightly enhanced.

          • snapdragonFan

            if you were to benchmark the play/pro/prime each one would have better
            benchmark performance than the previous even if they were to all run at
            the same frequency. It takes time to develop a processor, Each
            iteration allow for performance issues to be analyzed and
            solutions(slight redesigns) to be put in while also working harder to improve frequency.

          • Captain_Doug

            Okay. Then that all makes sense. I still think there are too many. I get having maybe 4 iterations of the same CPU to account for those changes and optimizations but 4 or 5 of each iteration? I’d think that would be a huge waste of resources. Do you know about that? You seem to be a wealth of non-douchey information on the subject and it is appreciated.

          • snapdragonFan

            It would actually be a bigger waste of resource to redesign from the ground up for each one. It takes 18-24 months to design from the ground up often times more. Then you still have to re-optimize for frequency and re-analyze for performance bottlenecks. Where as improvements on mature designs offer less risk(in terms of design bugs), known as opposed to unknown bottlenecks and less customer support(hopefully), while being able to get the design out the door in 6-9 months(sometimes a year). Known bottlenecks can be more easily designed around with less risk of introducing a bottleneck elsewhere. Also the chip is comprised of more than just the main krait core. The GPU and other controllers are designed and redesigned. One iterations of the chip might have the same krait core and a different GPU. Customer demand somewhat dictates what version of the Krait core is paired with what version of the GPU and other controllers. Eventually, usually when moving to smaller silicon technologies, designs from the ground up will be done. One of the reasons for waiting to move into a smaller technology is that smaller technology allows for more transistors which allows for radical redesign that can give much higher benchmarking gains with the added cost of lots of extra transistors all while occupying the same die footprint as the previous design in the older technology. This is crucial is the mobile design space, as form factor is one of the considerations customers look at.

          • Captain_Doug

            So redesigning a chip 3 or 4 times is more cost effective than just releasing 1 brand new CPU? I understand what you were saying about pairing different CPU’s and GPU’s for different applications but it still seems like much less resources would be used by putting out fewer chipsets but speeding up the process of releasing the S5.

          • snapdragonFan

            It takes less resources to add enhancements to mature designs, making sure the design doesn’t have any bugs is almost always the thing that takes the most time in the design process. Incremental improvements allow designers to reuse all the old code developed to verify the design, and if done correctly, incremental improvements in that code can be achieved much more easily. Unlike software, hardware bugs can be fatal to a processor, there isn’t always a patch that can be provided to fix the bug. The masks used to produce chips cost millions of dollars each. One bug that doesn’t have a software workaround can really hurt a companies bottom line. There is no speeding up the process to putting out the S5, throwing resources toward developing a processor helps if you are understaffed, but at some point you reach a critical mass and more people actually hinder development. Also, there are few people who can architect a processor(much like a building architect), while there many more people who can design a processor(like your carpenter and other laborers). The few chip architects can only be stretched so thin while still maintaining control over the integrity of the design. Chip architecture starts at least a year before design, then add 2 years for design and your looking at a three year cycle unless you flip/flop like Intel. Flip/Flop’ing takes time to foster as it takes twice a many people. Since Qualcomm is relatively new to the processor business(5-7 years or so) its likely they don’t have the critical mass to do it yet. Flip/flopping is great b/c you can get out a brand new design every 18 months(even though it really took 3 years). Even this is a long time, costumers demand the latest and greatest, offering a customer a chip that is 18 months old won’t sell very well. However, 6-12months, with better performance than the last will put you in customers favor(if you have a good product)

          • Captain_Doug

            I am in awe of your big brain. I think I get it now. I’d also assume that while customers do expect the latest and greatest, another reason to release the “S5″ would be that you can only optimize a CPU so much before you see diminished returns(overclocking might be oversimplifying but you get the idea). Would you agree with that assumption?

          • snapdragonFan

            There does come a point when optimizing (performance and frequency) gets much harder. Staying in the same technology node makes it harder each time you try to increase frequency b/c you can’t violate the laws of physics. Electrons can only travel so fast through a wire, the transistor can only switch on/off so fast. One way to get the frequency up is to have less logic each clock cycle, but to do that you have to extend the processor pipeline. Think about an elevator, to get from one floor to the next takes time, that time determines your frequency. You can make the heights of ceiling lower so it takes less time between floors, but then you have more floors(circuits). Also adding performance improvements to target bottlenecks also adds more circuits. More circuits means a bigger chip and more wasted power. Its always a tradeoff of power/performance/size. At some point it makes sense to redesign, especially if you can change technology nodes since the new nodes have faster and smaller circuits. So what would have been a problems for size in the old node isn’t an issue in the new node. Sometimes you remap a design to the new node, this lets you take a mature design and get the benefits of the new technology, which would then all more optimizations to be put in.

          • Captain_Doug

            So cool. Well, I’ll quit pestering you. Thanks for everything.

  • http://scribblepeople.net Mike

    bring it on, that will make the original cheaper