Home

Share this Story

New Report Adds to the LG G6 Specs List

We are a solid month away from the LG G6 unveiling at MWC, and as we inch closer, you will begin to be presented with what should be a complete picture of what the G6 is shaping up to be. Currently, we have seen what the top half of the device looks like, what the entire body may look like, and today, we’ve got a pretty solid understanding of the important specs we should expect to see. 

According to a report from CNET, LG’s big push is to make the G6 available ahead of Samsung’s Galaxy S8. To do so, will incorporate a Snapdragon 821 processor, unable to wait for the Snapdragon 835 to be available in mass quantity. According to the source, LG would have to hold off the G6 launch until April if it wanted to use the Snapdragon 835, but in order to beat Samsung to market, it’s going ahead with the SD 821. (Editor note: LG, just wait a month, bro!)

While the news of LG using an “old” processor is not too exciting, it is apparently confirmed via CNET’s source that Google Assistant will launch on the G6, making it the first device available with Assistant that isn’t a Google Pixel. This could help LG on the marketing side, which is never a bad thing.

Additionally, with the move away from modules (LG Friends), LG is to incorporate water resistance in the G6’s design. This isn’t the first time we have heard about the G6 possibly sporting the ability to take a dip in the pool, but provided we are a bit closer to MWC, everything is starting to feel a bit more official. While LG has not come out and confirmed any of this news, we feel confident that you can pencil in most of these specs and features.

February 26 is G6 day, folks. Are you ready?

Via: CNET
  • MH

    LG and HTC need to let google buy them and be done with this nonsense.

  • bloodless

    I agree. For the sake of 1 month, LG should wait so they can use the SD835. This will make the phone more up to date and competitive with THIS year’s phones. They will lose potential customers who will use a specs comparison to determine which phone to buy.
    LG I hope you are listening to this logic and do this right by waiting a bit so you can use the 835.

  • Brian

    Yeah. The 821 is now Garbage. I will toss out my Pixel as soon as the 835 drops.
    /s

  • Noel

    The LG G6 seems to be a very fine kick-ass device but it might turn off those in the know who would prefer the SD835 knowing the upgrades that chip brings. Seriously i wish they will get this “beat Sammy’s S8 to the market idealogy” and just wait the extra month to procure the SD835. I will say even with a delayed launch…the G6 with SD835 at its core, coupled with all the other specs and upgrades will be a phenomenal challenge to the S8 (the recent specs of the S8 doesn’t give it that much of an advantage over the G6 except the amoled panels & SD835).
    Men i strongly believe LG is about to screw up a PHENOMENAL PHONE with this rush to market with last years chipset. Pls i strongly hope they change their mind and wait..most of us will gladly wait a month or so if this is done. Hmmm even HTC has decided to wait for the SD835 before they release their next rumored highly specced flagship.

  • tyharrington

    I have zero faith in LG. I had a G3….after about 1.5 years, I got the “black screen” hardware failure, making the phone useless. I had owned the phone for about 1 year (and loved it) when my mom finally decided to upgrade from a flip phone to a smart phone, and she went with the G4. Her phone, shortly after going out of warranty, got the “boot loop” hardware failure, making the phone useless. And google is telling me there are lots of module failures on the G5.

    • Big EZ

      Software and hardware wise, except for the black screen of death, the G3 on 4.4 was the best Android phone to date. Sadly mine too died after about 18 months. After that I had two G4’s die within 6 months. I’m not sure i could trust an LG phone for awhile. There is no phone out right now that I think is decent, I feel like we’ve been taking steps backwards with smart phones.

      • tyharrington

        Agreed. I loved my G3. It was the first phone I had (previous was Galaxy Nexus, then Droid X before that, then Droid Eris), that I didn’t have any major complaints about (while it was working), and didn’t seem outdated after a year.

        I have an S7 now, and am happy with it, but it didn’t feel like a HUGE upgrade from the G3. Granted, I think that’s partially because the smartphone market has matured a bit, so we’re seeing less massive yearly improvements. But it’s also a testament to how good the G3 was in the year it was released.

        • Big EZ

          With autokiller (ram management, not a task killer) and liberty ROM the Droid X was a great phone. Without autokiller, it was unbearable.

          • tyharrington

            True. Droid X was decent. Noticeably big jump in quality from the Eris. Galaxy Nexus was great except battery (Verizon 🙁 ), and then the G3 was the first phone I had that felt like it didn’t need a ROM.

  • Bay_Ranger

    Why can’t they release the G6 early and then release the G6 SE two months later when the 835 becomes available?

  • John

    Well strong marketing push should mean immediate availability. If they wait a month before anyone can buy it, the S8 will be out and crush it by then. Then again, them and Moto never learn.

  • GalaxyUser

    They can easily release model with SD835 later, just like there’s G5 SE with SD652..

    • hkklife

      The 652 is a major downgrade from the 820.

      But I agree, a G6 “Prime” with 835 and maybe 2x the storage would make for a solid refresh around Q3, before the V30 comes out (if there is a V20 successor) and after the initial enthusiasm for the G6 has subsided.

      • Jeremy Turnley

        “after the initial enthusiasm for the G6 has subsided” – you mean early Q2, then? 😛

    • I think that’s what they’re gonna do.

  • deskjob

    Is Google Assistant really that big of a deal? I don’t own a Pixel (yet), but I guess I just don’t see it as a make or break feature, especially considering the other more tangible features like battery life, power efficiency, waterproof, etc.

  • marcusmarcus2

    Is anyone else kinda hoping the Snapdragon 835 has a heating issue like the 810 did? That way Samsung gets all the bad review/PR kinda as a punishment for hogging all the 835 processors.

  • ChrisI

    You people are just never satisfied are you?

    Were you clamoring for the SD821 when the 810/820 was out? Yes.

    Is there something you need to do with the 835 that is physically impossible with the 821?

    • T4rd

      Now it’s more about power efficiency and battery life than performance. The 835 is supposed to be considerably more power efficient than the 820/821, which is what most people are wanting.

      • hkklife

        If so (that’s the first I’ve heard about the 835’s efficiency) then that would explain the rumor that Samsung is sticking with the same battery capacity in the S8 line as it had in the S7 line.

        • T4rd

          Qualcomm claims it “uses 25% less power than previous designs, and is engineered to deliver exceptionally long battery life”. (https://www.qualcomm.com/products/snapdragon/processors/835)

          I’m sure Samsung will negate this somehow with some other hardware or software features/gimmicks, but you should still want the latest SoC if just for better power efficiency in some respect, the performance boost is just a bonus.

      • Jeremy Turnley

        Exactly. We honestly reached “full featured” with the flagships of last year. Camera, screens, software, all day normal use battery life, performance and build quality were all there. All that’s missing is enough battery life that you can use your phone heavily for the day and still make it to the end of the day without charging, or use it normally and get multiple days. Once we have that, the platform is fully mature. That’s what the 835 is pushing towards.

      • ChrisI

        But Android battery life still sucks IMO.
        If I had a nickel for everytime I heard “this processor is going to be so much more efficient than xxxx”, or “ICS/Jellybean/KitKat/Lollipop/Marshmallow/Nougat is going to revolutionize my battery life!!”, I’d have so much monies =)

        • T4rd

          Because OEMs continue to change their hardware and software to their phones to negate the power savings. Those things you mentioned do improve battery life, but adding stufff like larger/higher res displays, always on screens and assistants, and sometimes shrinking their battery capacity will negate those power savings elsewhere.

          But there are Android phones that get good battery life, they’re just mostly mid-range phones with the slower, but much more power efficient SoCs. Like my wife has a Moto Z Play with the SD625 and it consistently gets 10+ hours of SoT and with 3+ hours of talking in a charge. That phone can truly last 2 whole days with heavy usage. It beats the crap out of her old Note5 in both UI performance and battery life despite having lower specs.

    • cromo8

      Seriously, its always the same thing. 810 was great, release 820 and people say oh well 810 sucks now. Then rinse and repeat with 820/821.

      We are at a point that these specs do not really matter anymore. Phones last longer than a day now. That extra 5% efficiency is negligible.

      • T4rd

        810 was great? Seemed like a unanimous dumpster fire from the time it launched in the LG Flex 2 and the overheating/throttling issues came to light. That was the only year Samsung opted to pass on Qualcomm SoCs for all of their phones for their own Exynos, for good reason too. LG even opted to put the slower 808 in their G4 and V10 flagships after the Flex 2 too. That should say something about the 810.

        Mind you, this is coming from a 6P owner, one that has to root and modify the thermal.config file to raise the throttling limits so that some of the games I play don’t lag worse than my previous One M8 and even Note 2.

        • cromo8

          Happens with Every Gen. The 6P was flawless just too big and you must be in the minority because most people never saw overheating issues.

          • T4rd

            Overheating != throttling. I never had overheating issues. In its stock configuration, the 810 throttles way back (killing performance) within 2 mins of playing any somewhat demanding games. You can see this easily in the benches Anantech and others have ran on any 810 powered phones.

      • Jeremy Turnley

        You have a very strange recollection about the popularity of the 810. Remember how all of the phones that came out in the latter half of the year dropped the 810 and went with the lower spec 805 instead? Or how Samsung just plain skipped the 810/805 entirely because of the issues it had? The phone makers dropped the 810 like a steaming pile as soon as the throttling issues surfaced.

    • RDPaPa-G
      • ChrisI

        Ah, f*ck it. You win +100 =).
        Genius.

  • Josh Oberg

    Timing really doesn’t matter to people they are still buying s7 even though they are a year old and more expensive then before … People will buy a good product marketed well

  • That’s a good lookin phone, I wish LG could have gotten the 835 or rather had enough brand cache to go head to head with Sammy. I know most consumers may not care or even notice the difference but the tech media will bash it for having 2016 specs no matter what. I just want a fair fight not at a catchweight.

  • Josh Oberg

    If they use the old processor better come in $200 cheaper … But please don’t it’s not a flagship if the main component isn’t a ” flagship” component

    • M3D1T8R

      So using the latest, greatest processor available at launch is some how not “flagship”?

      “SD821 isn’t flagship” [vs some more powerful chip yet to be released].. the world some people live in.

  • Me

    This thing better be the purtiest phone on the market or it’s gonna be rough. Especially since it has almost identical specs to the pixel, which has been marketed HEAVILY

    • hkklife

      Pixel is worthless to many of LG’s target audience—no expandable storage & no waterproofing are 2 biggies right there.

      • Me

        Ehh, many of LGs target audience is waiting on the S8.

        • G5

          nah. Not till that home button and hard keys go the wayside.

  • mickeyB88

    It won’t matter if they beat Samsung to the market if they don’t fix how they launch the thing. The V20 took almost two months from announcement to be released stateside, with almost no indication when that was going to be, for a while.

  • Danmheadache

    Why can’t LG use their own Nuclun CPU? Didn’t 3rd gen. come out last July or something? Is it still not powerful as SD or Exynos cpu?

  • Harry Balsaq

    I just love how any processor more than 6 months old is suddenly crap and you can’t even do a single thing on your phone supposedly.

    • Josh Oberg

      It’s about future proofing the phone if you spend 600-700 on a phone needs to last, out of the box this thing is already behind

      • Harry Balsaq

        that’s bull. if your phones processor can’t get by 2 years then that’s stupid. Funny I have G4 with an 808 seems to work just fine. But how can that be it’s so old? I should be lucky it even turns on. Seriously something is wrong with the world if you can’t have a CPU last more than 6 months before it’s considered garbage. The 821 will be fine. It will be fine in 2018 and in 2019.

        • Josh Oberg

          I’ve seen hundreds of g4 get exchnaged out due to the processor failing so… The processor is fine … But not flagship… So price point determine early adopters pay a premium to have the top of the line.

        • Chumley99

          I have an old G4 as well that I use as a spare phone and it’s a great phone. Feels good in the hand, probably one of the best feeling phones with a removable cover and I have never had boot issues that people complain about either. The only negative I have with it is off-angle screen viewing. The screen only looks good within a fairly narrow angle of view.

          • gboybama

            Underrated phone. I moved on only due to the locked bootloader.

          • Antoine Devon Swans

            Completely true! They have that LG G4 Body Curve ratio weight down to a science.

        • EP_2012

          It begs the question: why not just save a few hundred dollars and get last year’s model with basically the same specs?

          If I’m going to shell out $1000 for a phone (that’s how much flagships cost in Canada), then it better be the latest tech (and apparently the 835 is *significantly better* than the 821).

          • HeatFan786

            If you’re spending $1000 CAD on a phone, it better do more than just have the latest tech. For instance, a 256gb iPhone 7+ is $1,359.13 CAD ($1,036.83 USD) after taxes with 7% GST in an American state (let’s say GST since it’s just a sales tax). $1,309 for the same capacity iPhone 7+ but before GSTs.

            7+ has the fastest processor right now on the market, a 1080p screen, older LTE radios, 3GB of RAM, a solid camera, smaller battery, big bezels, etc. That’s a complete waste if you ask me. It has to do so much more to make it worthwhile in Canada imo.

            That’s why a 2 year contract for $0.00-$100 with the S7 can be so popular. Rogers wants an outstanding $910 before tax. That’s about $693.41 USD before tax. It’s funny how you can find a GS7 refurb for $350 USD on eBay, ($459.32 CAD).

            A OP3T at $600 is much better value than the S7, iPhone, and many other flagships. I cannot blame you for wanting the best of the best in a phone at that price, but I would certainly hope that the flagship of your choice does major stuff because I would stick to the best value phone if I lived in Canada.

          • EP_2012

            I can only justify spending $1000 or more if it’s a Samsung Note device. I only buy phones outright, and spending $500 on my OnePlus 3, while it’s a good device device, leaves me wanting a lot more.

            Value, is completely subjective – The S7 takes way better photos than the OnePlus 3 – it may justify an extra few hundred dollars to some people (not to mention the waterproofing, wireless charging, etc.).

          • HeatFan786

            Agreed on all your points. The Galaxy Note line is the best of the Android flagships, excluding the Touchwiz lag. But value can be objective too: which phone offers the most software support, hardware reliability, and the cheapest price possible. But there are so many compromises with most devices, that’s why subjectivity is a better gauge because only you know which phone suits your needs the best.

        • I’m indifferent about this. I don’t feel like the 821 processor is bad at all. It’s great. I’m just looking for the features that come with the 835 processor such as Qualcomm Quick Charge 4.0 w/ the proper USB-C spec, improve image processing, better power efficiency (for the battery), etc.

          • Noel

            Well said my man..yes the SD821 is not outdated but the SD835 comes with so many improvements and anyone in the know wants that chip managing the operations inside their $$xpensive 2017 flagship. I know i do…i like what i see so far about the G6 and the SD835 will just make it more awesome and future proof.

          • Thanks, and I agree.

          • bloodless

            Agree 100 percent. LG are you listening ?

          • Jason Robert Austin

            No, they are not listening—or else they’d delay launch 6 weeks. But they’re too committed now to change direction midstream. Wish they would though. I’ve never had an LG and yet every year I want to give the underdog a chance—and yet they blow the opportunity every year. I WANT to not have a Samsung, but LG has to at least be on par.

      • Ivo Shandor

        I disagree with this. The people you’re saying are trying to “future proof their phone” and are worried about the latest SoC are the same people that buy a new phone every year or less. These same people always have to have the latest and greatest features, OS, and hardware. So “future proofing” is irrelevant. People that are going to own a phone for 2+ years aren’t worried about SoC’s because they’ve already accepted that they are going to be a couple generations behind on every front.

        And yes I realize this comment is going to immediately be argued with because of the tech majority that frequent Droid Life. But believe me, the average consumer which makes up the bulk of sales won’t care about an 821 vs. 835. I’d wager that a person that works in a brick and mortar retailer has heard this question only a handful of times. If ever.

        • Josh Oberg

          You’re correct customers don’t ask for this by name, but they do ask for the “best” or ” latest” or “fastest” and those who do purchase phones every year tend to give them to friends and family or sell them so it’s important to maintain high resale value and performance like having the latest processor

        • Jeremy Turnley

          That would be fine, but the point of spending flagship money on a phone is to make sure you get the latest and greatest. If everything about the G6 is true, does it really have much of a leg up on the GS7/GS7E that will be dropping in price considerably once the GS8 launches? Is it worth spending $700 on a phone that’s only marginally better than a phone that you can already find on sale for $500 on a regular basis and will be even cheaper in 3 months? Value is what is important to most people, and getting something that costs the price of this years tech but is based on last years tech is not a great value.

          • Ivo Shandor

            Oh, don’t get me wrong. I’m not defending the G6, I haven’t owned an LG phone since the G2. That was a pretty bad ass phone at the time though. I wouldn’t buy the G6, but it has nothing to do with the SoC. I’m talking specifically the 821 vs. 835 debate and “future proofing”. The 835 isn’t even available yet (as far as I know?). It’s the age old argument about “just wait until ____ comes out”. Then you’re always waiting. I get that on Droid LIfe almost everyone has to have the bleeding edge tech. Until there’s something better in 6 months. I’ve literally seen people on here who have bought 3 or 4 new phones in one year. And that’s fine for them if thats’ what they want to do. I gave up on that. Personally I don’t mind being a gen or 2 behind, but that’s just me. I gave my son my N6 and that phone still cooks. Only has an 805 in it. My 6P has an 810, but I have yet to see a phone that’s smoother and snappier. But your point about just getting a GS7 vs. the G6 is perfectly reasonable. The GS7 could very well be the better phone, you’ll get no argument from me there. And saving a few hundred bucks definitely makes it the better value. And I agree with you when it comes to value. However, Josh Oberg and I were talking about his statement regarding a phone being “future proof” and able to “last”. At this point SoC’s are so good I don’t think they have a heavy impact on these talking points anymore. I get that it’s supposed to be 25% more power efficient or whatever, but we’ve all see what claims based on a lab environment or thermal models are versus real world use.

      • HeatFan786

        Future proofing a phone? New technology comes out so frequently. Phones depreciate the moment you open the box. You can still use a Nexus 6P’s 810 processor from 2015 until now, but your phone isn’t “future proof” because new things come out. A “future proof” phone might not have full Daydream VR support, native Google Assistant, water resistance, 4×4 MIMO/256 QAM speeds, etc. If you mean “future proof” as “obsolete resistant” then that’s a different story because flagships see about a year or two of support. It’s hard to future proof a phone because of ever changing tech.

    • Good_Ole_Pinocchio

      It’s less that, and more phone cost. If the g6 cost the same as the S8…then based on specs alone —why bother with the G6? That’s what I boils down to. If you want a phone with an 821 just get a $400 OnePlus 3t

      • Harry Balsaq

        LG doesn’t price their devices as high as the Samsung, A reason why I go with LG. The OnePlus3T won’t work on verizon Einstein. I guess Galaxy S 7 is junk then too right? The V20 also junk, Pixel junk, any iPhone junk. See none of them have the 835 so they are all clearly garbage. Oh wait they aren’t.

        • Josh Oberg

          Disagree see v20 …$770

          • Adrian Ioanci

            MIL-STD-810G certified
            An S7 wouldn’t survive half of the v20 can take. that’s why it cost that much

        • Good_Ole_Pinocchio

          Stop being ridiculous. If the S7 and V20 and Pixel are all $800 the decision will fall to what’s the best bang for the buck. That’s the difference. You’re not going to buy an S7 of it was the same price of the S8. That doesn’t make any sense.

          • Prototype

            Why do you even bother replying to him? He is contrary and belligerent with 99% of what he posts. If people would stop feeding him maybe he’d leave.

        • Jeremy Turnley

          The G5 ARP at launch was $624, the GS7 was $669, and the GS7E was $779. Feature wise, the G4 was more akin to the GS7, which was not much more expensive.

      • Jeremy Turnley
    • BobButtons

      I mean, why stop with the 835? That crap’s trash compared to its successor. Boo, Samsung, only going with what’s coming out next and not what’s coming out after that. I’ll just wait….

    • John

      Its not crap by any means, just there’s something better and 1 extra month is not a very long time to wait to incorporate it. If they price it in the $600 range, it will stand a chance. If they price it $700+, its done.

  • Dominick White

    how will. having Google Assistant help the LG G6, when it don’t help the Pixle /Xl in any meaningful way?

    • Good_Ole_Pinocchio

      Because they need an Assistant. Everybody is going to be advertising AI. You can’t not have an AI component.

      • glimmerman76

        its not like the pixel is not selling tho.. Its outsold most phones in the past months. The problem is a time old google problem they cant get there OEM partner to make enough of them quick enough.

  • Eric

    If beating Samsung to launch is so important to them, they better have a strong marketing push. No point in launching early if the regular consumers don’t know anything about it.

  • Good_Ole_Pinocchio

    Watch them Announce at MWC and have us wait a month for release anyway…smfh….

    I’m interested (I think they’ll make the device cheaper to compete)…..But that software. I hate it. Its the only major OEM where I still very much dislike their software. So we’ll see what they do about that. And having Assistant is great too — I still have no idea what Google is doing with Assistant in regard to their OEMS but they need to figure it out before every other OEM starts promoting Alexa

  • s2knj

    Can someone answer this question for me….If LG claims it doesn’t want to compete with the S8, is one measly month enough for people to choose this over the S8? If I were the prospective buy, a one month wait is basically nothing

    • Good_Ole_Pinocchio

      I think we may be overlooking that fact that it would be more than a month. They would have no choice but to launch a month or more after the S8 because they simply wouldn’t have the chips available in enough quantity before then. Samsung is literally taking the entire first batch. There isn’t enough left to launch at the same time as the S8.

      • s2knj

        Thank you for that. It makes perfect sense.

  • Aaron
  • Francisco Peña

    only tech nerds will care much about 835. if they get out a new unit before Samsung, with waterproof, large screen, etc… then so be it. Some folks will still be upset at Samsung and looking for a change due to the Note (even if they weren’t impacted by it.)

    • Good_Ole_Pinocchio

      Tech nerds are the ones that help the PLEBS make decisions about phones. Family and Friends always ask “What phone should I get” … that’s where the influence comes from… And if the question is “Should I just wait for the Next Galaxy next month” the Answer will probably be YES. That’s how that Influence trickles downhill

      • Josh Oberg

        Exactly

      • BobButtons

        Then days after that comes out we can start all over by trashing the horribleness of the 835, praising whatever comes next. Such a glorious time of year.

        • Good_Ole_Pinocchio

          Nothing will be next this year though. It’s already late. 835 in the Pixel 2 and Note 8 I bet.

    • Jeremy Turnley

      The vast majority of people who had a Note 8 got a GS7E as their replacement phone, and the GS7E remained the top selling phone throughout the rest of the year despite the recall. You severely overestimate how much impact the recall had on consumer confidence in the Samsung brand. As long as the S8 and Note 8 are fine, the recall will be nothing more than a footnote in the company’s history.

  • Leonard Wong

    LG simply do not want to compete directly with Galaxy S8. They rather give up the processor.

    • hkklife

      Considering that LG’s phones usually are priced $100 less than the equivalent Samsung (sometimes there’s an even greater price discrepancy) at full retail and depreciate much faster than Samsung handsets do, LG being Hyundai to Samsung’s Honda would not be such a bad position to be in. I’ve seen a LOT of lower-end & prepaid LG handsets lately like the Stylo series. “Affordable high end flagship” might be where they are wanting to position the G line, with the V line taking the top tier of the lineup as they rightly should.