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Video: Hands-on With NVIDIA’s Grid Gaming System on a Nexus 7 [CES 2013]

nvidia grid1

Outside of NVIDIA’s Project Shield gaming system and the Tegra 4, their other CES announcement of Grid Cloud Gaming might be equally as impressive. With their new Grid servers, NVIDIA is taking PC-quality gaming and pushing it to any screen in the world, including mobile devices like smartphones and tablets.  

These Grid servers have specialized hardware and sophisticated streaming and virtualization software, that simultaneously  delivers up to 36-times more HD-quality game streams than first-gen cloud-gaming systems. It’s also supposed to reduce lag, something that everyone should be worried about when considering a cloud gaming system. To learn all of the dirty details inside Grid, hit up NVIDIA’s site.

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We had a chance to take Grid for a spin today at NVIDIA’s CES booth. Our video footage is below, but overall, Tim (our resident gamer) came away mostly impressed. He experienced a bit of lag with Need for Speed, but on games like Battlefield 3, it was pretty on point.

If this is the true future of gaming, count us in as part of the “excited” group.

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  • CapnShiner

    The real advantage of something like Grid, to me, is that it could work with something like Google TV. PC games require a controller or keyboard and mouse. I don’t know about anyone else but I don’t want to carry around peripherals for a phone or tablet. I would only use something like that at home. Google TV would be perfect for that. For gaming away from home, I only want to carry one device in addition to my phone. That may be where Shield comes in but that just seems a little redundant to me. We already have portable gaming devices from Sony and Nintendo with established ecosystems and I don’t think we need any more. The idea of playing PC games on such a small screen does not seem appealing to me. Mobile games are better suited for the small screen. A 15″ laptop is about as small as I would go for playing PC games. Why do we need another new portable gaming device?

  • PrimalRage84

    It’s simple just buy a few Grids. BaM 2013 arcade local gaming network. Throw one in all the malls and welcome back to the 1980s.

    • normmcgarry

      The world would be a better place.

  • Joey Miranda

    seems like onlive cloud gaming.

  • http://www.facebook.com/otto.dieffenbach Otto Dieffenbach

    that is cool! there are plenty of pc games from yesteryear that i wish i had the ability to play. but then again i just discovered my wacom connects through otg, meaning no time for games. so i am now i am forced to break it to the n7 it is a productive tool and cant play with MOGA till it gets its work done.

  • Blacksolid

    should have extracted the apk haha

  • http://twitter.com/kirilv Kiril

    The question remains, what will the experience be like in real life? I don’t doubt that it can be great over a local network, with the Grid running feet away from the tablet, but what will it be like for us real people with terrible cable internet and university routers that cut out all the time?

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000197577056 Daniel Moreno

      There have been some advances recently that would mitigate the distance factor. Take for instance optical computing. If that were integrated into networking, then the only conversion points back to electric for data would be your router/computer and the server itself.

      • http://twitter.com/kirilv Kiril

        Right, and that’s great. However, most people will not have an optical connection for years, and they are releasing this right now. Plus, I am not so much concerned about distance as I am slow connections. When I was in the dorms in college (big gamer population), I had a hard time watching even YouTube videos in the evenings. My cable internet now suffers from similar problems with streaming video, and also takes a while to resolve random requests during peak hours.

  • EvanTheGamer

    That. is. awesome! EvanTheGamer is digging NVIDIA’s GRID Cloud Gaming. (Yes, I just typed in third-person, so sue me!)

  • JMonkeYJ

    unfortunately demos like these aren’t a good way to evaluate this technology because everything is set up for best-possible lag that can’t reasonably be hoped to be matched in the real world (everyone would need a server in their home to get the same lag conditions). still, i think this kind of thing is cool and it would be nice if it could ever work.

  • S2556

    so these are the same as the PC games? not deflated mobile versions?

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000615318329 Kevin Kaykay Kim

      Essentially, this is “middle ground” device sending the game data to Tablet and etc running Tegra on Android. tl;dr, yes it’s 100% (or should be) PC games and not nerfed mobile versions.

    • Tony Allen

      Imagine it like streaming youtube/netflix if you will. The video/content is actually on another device, you just choose to watch and interact with it on your ‘portal’. Very much the same as OnLive, except this one appears to, work.

  • j__h

    Grid + Shield looks to be the whole package!

  • JamesU513

    SUATMM (shut up and…)

  • Droidzilla

    This makes far more sense than the whole “Project Shield” nonsense (what an utterly stupid name, too). I’m wanting to have less devices in my arsenal; not more.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000615318329 Kevin Kaykay Kim

      I’m pretty sure nVidia will try to market the two together.

    • EvanTheGamer

      Project SHIELD is a cool name, but the name doesn’t really match the product. It doesn’t even look like a shield! Damnit!

      lol

      • michael arazan

        impressive