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Is Wireless Tether About to Get the Android Axe? Carriers Finally Starting to Block it?

If you aren’t sure what that picture is saying, let me attempt to break it down for you.  After receiving a tip that Verizon may be blocking Wireless Tether from the market, I decided to do a little digging on the variety of devices I own.  Sure enough, from all of my phones, including the Nexus S I have running on AT&T, I was unable to find Wireless Tether in the market.  So to see what was really going on, I jumped into the browser-based Android Market to see if I could find the app and definitely did.  But what you are seeing, is my list of devices, all of which cannot accept this app.

Now, we’ve known for some time now that carriers were going to start cracking down on tethering, and you know what, it makes sense that they would.  In fact, AT&T has been warning users that were illegally tethering over the last week, so it wouldn’t surprise us if Verizon was jumping on board with that program.  And if these quick couple of searches that I performed this morning mean anything, then it looks like your days of “stealing data” are about to come to an end.

Anyone else able to find Wireless Tether?  Let me know your phone and carrier please.

Cheers AC!

  • Don Pridemore Jr

    I tether my laptop for free using usb…as far as other devices wireless…  yes… you have to pay for that.

  • Ctbailbondgal

    My Droid Incredible 2 with Verizon will no longer tether..do you have a fix?

  • (personally, I’m a bigger fan of USB tethering on my OG DROID. It’s robust, and it allows me to tether *to* WiFi on my phone. There are several hotspots that the Linux Intel drivers on my laptop just aren’t able to connect to (especially enterprise hotspots) and my phone can… Plus, it charges my phone from my laptop simultaneously)

  • My fiancee has an LG Optimus V on Virgin Mobile (grandfathered into the unlimited (but throttled) data for only $25/month). She uses “Quick Settings” to turn on the infrastructure-mode tethering built into Froyo (which is not available via settings but is available through API that Quick Settings accesses).

    It’s very easy to turn on and really robust. We actually purchased her phone solely to be a cheap pay-as-you-go WiFi hotspot, and now she’s gradually using it more as her primary phone.

    I don’t know much about Android under the covers and what changed in Gingerbread and ICS. I do know that this wasn’t possible on the OG DROID that I have because infrastructure-mode tethering was simply impossible with the hardware within the phone.

    So why can’t others get tethering via her solution? Why aren’t people on Verizion (et al.) using Quick Settings to flip on the tethering inside Android? Is it because most carriers distribute a stripped-down version of Android that doesn’t have the tethering back door enabled?

  • Anonymous

    For weeks now I can’t use my Tmobile Dell Streak 7 as a wireless hotspot. I’m on the 5GB plan which is suppose to have this feature. Anybody else on tmo with this problem?

  • Inshame

    If ATT wants to “flex” contract muscle, add extra charges, resort to bullying tactics, the freedom in a capitalist society gives us the wiggle room to take our over paid cell phone payments elsewhere. Breech of contracts in lawsuits. Bully.

  • Factoryorders

    What….? turn myself in? Lol….no thanks

  • Prozac4me

    I was always under the impression that unlimited meant, without limitations…  I guess, Webster is going to have to update the definition for phone companies.  Unlimited (for phone companies), may read, anything that doesn’t interfere with profit!

    When I DON’T go over my minutes, I don’t see them reimbursing me for NOT going over minutes!  AOL was sued for this type of behavior in the 90’s, for selling service to everyone, and not having enough ports for it’s users to log in. 

    If my data habits effect the network so adversely, then we need to re-negotiate the contract, and start paying me for when I don’t go over.  Quit calling something unlimited, and say if we don’t like how much data you use, we will throttle, er, i mean network optimize you!

  • Chaosnyx0

    I am currently using Wireless Tether to run on my Droid X. If you search for the apk via google and get the app that way, you will be able to use it. Obviously you must be rooted to use the wireless tether. BARNACLE is in the market and works just as good people. 

  • VerizonSucks

    I can’t wait until my contract with the scumbags over at Verizon is finally DONE!!!
    The day I bought it from the Smithfield Rhode Island store the dirtbag salesman there proudly showed tha tI could use my DroidX as a Hot-Spot.
    And THEN Hurricane Irene hit and when I went to use my DroidX as a Hot-Spot, the dirtbags over at Verizon took me to a page displaying a pricing chart.
    Suddenly my Hot-Spot was going to cost me an additional $20 per month.
    When my contract is complete I will turn my back on the dishonest company called Verizon!!!

  • Gamma1148

    What you are all missing is that Verizon advertised the Wireless Access Point (Connect up to five devices)!!! as a selling point for the phone.  They hide the detail that mentions the cost in a 4 point font on the edge of the advertisement, if at all.  This is deceptive advertising. They then take a feature that is native to the phone and disable it unless you upgrade to their higher cost service, then they punish the 1% of people who re-enable the feature via root.  I know for a fact that my contract doesn’t say that If I root my phone and use wifi tether to gain free tethering I would be breaking the law.  (Nor do I think that laws exist that say rooting an open source operating system is illegal) 

  • Searching_for_Key_Largo

    I know that through Google and other search engines I am {just checked to see for this post} currently able to find pdanet {from Junesfabrics}, easytether, wireless tether, miwi, and others — this is if you’re not surfing on your phone or whatever because the carrier blocks things with Google approval {as ATT, Verizon, et al does not show these things through their service such as their app store but others such as Sprint will}. The update last done from pdanet was with option to select no level, level 1 {hides tether}, level 2 {may hide tether but not suggested as some sites surfed to will show or pick up the android etcetera part}.

    As far as the droid symbol versus the internet page symbol for IE, Firefox, etcetera, when browsing or surfing the web…no, I don’t have those symbols and never have had {the droid or whatever} and in fact I was testing out pdanet for my fiancee via his phone and computer then with his phone and my computer with no other than normal symbols or whatnot for surfing. Also history has no indication of anything unusual with the history, web site{s} url{s}, or anything else {to indicate was surfing via the phone and pdanet, etcetera}.

    In fact, oddly enough, the only problem was going through his phone for netflix {it now has app for viewing que not just merely adding to que}; in that case it would do fine with minimal or no buffering {depending on whether verizon was working worth anything on their internet}. However, when using pdanet through the phone for netflix on the computer it would not load netflix at all or when it did it would say not supported {go figure, it confused me thinking it out}.

    Overall, having just tried the one {but being able to find all of them relatively easy on the computer through google but not necessarily the phone itself} it works fine except when verizon themselves are barely able to surf anywhere to begin with.

  • Vacman2000

    I just found out today that my Verizon Thunderbolt which I bought understanding was a “Mobile HotSpot” now is not a “Mobile HotSpot”… but it could be again for a mere $20 more a month! ALL the adds next to EVERY smartphone and tab at the Verizon store, DO NOT in any way say or even slightly suggest that this “Mobil HotSpot” feature will cost you extra. I think this was, and still is, blatantly misleading and that Verizon should have a class action suite filed against them for false advertising and bait and switch!

  • Stangplorer

    you can still download wireless tether and anything that they have ever taken off the market from a certain website which i will not be posting here … however verizon blocked the tether program somehow .. i have a droid x2 just rooted it last night with gingerbreak and cant even use wireless tether… sucks but there is always pdanet and other stuff like that …. just not wifi and barnacle is only ad hoc

  • Wynner70

    This is bullshit written by some carrier shill.

  • i guess i ave to say no matter i never got it wooring on droidx! MycriKet.com networK.. I dont Know wHat IM Missin

  • chikenhawk

    this is the thing that people are to complacent to see with Verizon. In order to use a wireless tether app the way that they want you to you pay for the same data 3x over. First you have to have “unlimited data” on your plan, then to even have an android phone you MUST pay for an “android data” plan per line then you must pay again for the 3g hotspot/wireless tether. So lets do some math here:
    $30 for unlimited option on your phone plan
    $25 if you have an android phone
    $20 if you want to use a tethering app
    thats $75 for the same data!!!!!
    I personally think its crap. And the argument that using a computer would add heavier usage to the towers is not as true as they would like you to think. The throughput on a phone is the same regardless of whether or not you are using the phone or a tether. I am perfectly capable of watching hd movies on my phone as I am on my computer where is the difference. HD being 720-1080p

  • anonymous

    i use wireless tether and before i upgraded to gingerbread on my droid x, i was able to tether. now when i try and use the app, i can connect to the internet but instead of going to google, it brings me to verizons page to sign up to use my phone as a hotspot… im going to figure out a way to do it. i will get around this but i think the phone companies know we want to do this and figure they would rather take all our money than actually give us a good deal… and now verizon wants to remove the unlimited data plan… bastards… i say boycott cell phone companies. if no one used their phone for an entire day, how much money do you think they would lose?

    • chikenhawk

      they would actually make money as then you would still be paying for the service but not utilizing it.

  • Waynemartin1561

    It blows my mind how this is even considered an issue, and let me be more specific…
    If something is clearly undeniably wrong and let’s throw the word “unjust” in as well, if you sign a contract agreeing to it does that now make it right and or just?
    The quick and easy answer is “NO”!
    Smart phones in and of themselves are mini computers and there are now apps as well as keyboard and monitor docking stations that Smartphone’s can be plugged into and what you ostensibly have is a bloody laptop.
    For me the majority of my downloads are done on my Smartphone and then in my case it’s a Droid X and are then transferred to my Laptop.  Also, in case some of you don’t know the Droid X has a mini HDMI output so you can stream movies directly to another device which would usually be a Flat screen television.  This in and of itself would to me suggest streaming huge amounts of data.
    I like to watch documentaries and every once in awhile a good movie, so for me it’s a really good thing that my phone has unlimited internet/data!
    When I purchased my phone I knew that I was going to need an internet connection and my carrier is Verizon.  So I honestly inquired about purchasing a separate internet service plan along with a wireless card that I could plug into my computer so I could get internet and do the mass majority of my downloads i.e. a 2 gigabyte plus HD documentaries and or movies and usually 2 or more at a time.
    What I ended up finding out was this service was not unlimited and was maxed out at 2 Gigabyte a “MONTH”!   OK, and sorry but I blast through 2 Gig. by lunchtime and If you go over that it’s $20.00 for every additional 2 Gig. !!!  Being that by today standards 2 Gigabyte is gobbled up just sitting around streaming youtube for a of couple hours.
    So for all of you saying that there is too heavy a load on wireless… I submit that your point is moot and without merit, and is in fact “fait accompli” or something already done and beyond alteration.
    When a company or group of companies like Verizon and AT&T provide a service and they got you by the contractual throat you are to some extent at their mercy.
    As far as I see it I am paying for Data and this data is limited only by the bandwidth of my service in that it is supposed to be “Unlimited.
    I would also like to through something else out there… A common answer I hear about tethering and will my wireless carrier know if I am using my phone to provide an internet connection for my computer and penalize me i.e. slam you with an ungodly magnanimous phone bill…
    No they probably won’t know as long just you don’t download ridiculous insane amounts of data.
    This answer is by far and away B.S. in that your weakest link is your signal and your bandwidth and I am a living example of this in that I download ridiculous insane amounts of data on a daily basis if not on an hourly basis straight to my phone. 
    Sense you are going directly through your phone to receive your wireless signal you are not going to be able to download appreciably more data via your laptop going through your phone then you would directly from your phone.  So using the amount of data downloaded as a gage to determine if you are using your phone as way of getting an internet connection for your computer simply doesn’t hold water and makes me want to pull my hair out by the roots every time I read this.
    In the end I have purchased unlimited data at a maximum bandwidth and I should be able to use that any way I see fit.
    An analogy I would use would be if I purchase a movie on a DVD have I not just purchased the rights to watch that media however or wherever I want?
    Or have I only purchased the rights to watch this media on a DVD player only?
    I would submit that it is the former and not the latter.
     

  • John

    I have a Droid 2 Global with Verizon and I searched wireless tethering on the market and found A WIFI Tether AP Mesh Client by Open Garden, Open Source.
    I have not tried it yet, however, so I don’t know if I can use it.

  • Ke_kromer

    I’m with US Cellular and they charge a fee to tether but it’s great because in the boonies, where USC is really the best option, there aren’t a lot of wifi spots and it’s great to be able to hook up the laptop (my Froyo/Desire has a hotspot app but it’s slower than usb tether).
    I hope they will continue to offer this option.
    What about the wireless modem cards that carriers used to sell?  Do those plans still make them money, if so then that’s why they’re cutting off the tethering…

  • Ke_kromer

    I’m with US Cellular and they charge a fee to tether but it’s great because in the boonies, where USC is really the best option, there aren’t a lot of wifi spots and it’s great to be able to hook up the laptop (my Froyo/Desire has a hotspot app but it’s slower than usb tether).
    I hope they will continue to offer this option.
    What about the wireless modem cards that carriers used to sell?  Do those plans still make them money, if so then that’s why they’re cutting off the tethering…

  • Toms Daksa

    Thanks god I live in Latvia and my carrier is LMT, I can tether as much as I want.

    What next? Prohibit us from using unprotected wi-fi networks?

  • Chris

    Doesn’t Android (at least in recent versions) allow tethering as part of the standard OS install anyway? Pretty sure it’s there on both my Nexus One and HTC Desire.

  • lmao

  • Furreal Pursuhn

    Another scam for the same bandwidth we’re already paying for. Someone in Congress want to step up here? Or of course I am sure this is over their technical heads…

  • Nemesis1701

    Droid is crap made from crap and used by thieves

  • Nemesis1701

    Droid is crap made from crap and used by thieves

  • Guestey

    To the “You signed a contract people”. Yes I did. My Verizon contract had:
    1. phone has unlimited data
    2. tethering has a 5GB data limit

    Which mean I am NOT “stealing” when I tether and yanking my ability to tether IS a contract violation by Verizon.

    Sadly the violation will probably just entitle me to break my contract early with no termination fees so I can go to a provider that allows tethering like…

  • Anonymous

    “stealing data” WTF?

    Instead of digging around looking for the app, why don’t you dig around and look for some information on how these carriers are justified in essentially charging you twice for the data you already pay for.

    Hint: It makes no logical sense and unless the author of Wireless Tether is getting a cut it’s illegal.

    …Does your water company charge you extra to have a dishwasher in your home??

  • Welp I’m glad I already snagged this.

  • Shawn99452

    You can always just find the .apk and install it manually, rather than from the market. This would be a deal-breaker for most apps, but remember that to run Wireless Tether, you need to have a phone that is rooted, AND have a netfilter-enabled kernel (which no carrier is going to provide). So you pretty much need to be running a custom ROM on your rooted phone, and if you did all that you shouldn’t have any trouble side-loading Wireless Tether.

  • Someone

    I don’t get it, you pay for your data no matter what you do with it
    1 MB youtube, 1 MB mail or 1 MB tether traffic

  • Jaimex2

    My Nokia n900 gets past this very easily running a squid proxy server, I’m sure someone will port it to Android.

  • Carriers have a hard time waking up to a new reality, which is that all they’re good for is providing bandwidth and data connectivity. Sure, you can deliver different dataplans for different use types. But that’s about it. It’s cool that they’re delivering some additional services such as voice but there’s a limit to how important this is. VOIP is rapidly taking over voice as a service and nobody is interested in a dinosaur trying to hold on to their little monopoly. Imagine going to the hardware store and asking for a piece of rope. Sure, sais the salesman, but what are you going to use it for? Ehh, what? Well, if you’re going to use it make a leesh for your dog we can offer it to you for a great price $5/m, but if you you’re going to lift some furniture to the attic with it. Well, that’s a whole other level of convenience. Then it’s $15/m. And by the way, you can’t lift any IKEA couches with it. Competition, you know. I would suggest regulators force phone infrastructure suppliers both mobile and fixed to accept any kind of competing service providers. And also ensure that “voice” cannot be delivered by those phone infrastructure suppliers but by separate service providers. This way, we can have some serious competition focusing on delivering superior quality in stead of ripping you off. Why would a mobile phone be different than your ADSL line?

  • no

    One word Applanet

  • two words: side load

  • Scott

    You should always be able to download the apk from http://code.google.com/p/android-wifi-tether/downloads/list

  • Anonymous

    They really ought to take a page from iTunes and add a tethering service. It’s clear that people want this functionality, they ought to sell it to them.

  • I’m so happy that US carriers don’t run my phone

  • Anonymous
  • Quenharo 2014

    NO Pdanet on Verizon Moto Droid

  • WebOS on Sprint and no issues. If you all don’t like this crap then switch carriers. ATT is now instituting caps on wired (Uverse and DSL) as well. Seems to me that they don’t want my money, so I won’t give it to them. Easy!

  • Seanbone

    Everyone w/ unlimited data should filibuster by constantly downloading netflix movies around the clock…all at the same time…..until the carriers agree to allow tethering w/ no additional charge….somebody please setup a data-download day on facebook so we can all protest.

  • WT is out on code.google.com. Download it, slide it over, and run the .apk. Just because the market won’t let you have it doesn’t mean you can’t install it.

  • I was just able to download it to my HTC G2 on T-mobile…

  • If I root my phone, would I still be able to tether?

  • gordon

    Not everyone does it, only root. So what does it really matter? Give it out for free, I guaranty that you will get TONS of new costumers to your network

  • Fenopie

    Yup, same thing here with T-Mobile. 🙁

  • Grem135

    It came installed on my T-Mobile MyTouch4G and works perfect

    • Grem135

      I forgot to add, it is also unlimited though I do get throttled to 3g if I go over 5gig… well, some people do anyway

  • sprint evo, still see it on the market

  • Can download and install from market with both Telstra and Vodafone in Australia. Wonder how long it’ll last. Hooray for adb install 🙂

  • Alexander

    This is ridiculous. I’ll probably repeat something so many have stated before but, look we have data caps 5gb usually. I’m with T-mobile, and after the 5gb, internet slows down to snail speed (still unlimited mind you). In my case, the carrier can just stfu because I’m using the alloted amount I get, and then I’m using up barely any bandwidth with dial-up speeds they give me after the cap.

    The thing is, if you give me a cap, I should be able to do whatever I want with it. Bandwidth or not, phones and the laptops being tethered will run at the same speed because it’s going through the phone, no? What’s the point then?

    I use my phone to view data-intense websites, play flash games etc. I can even bitTorrent from my phone. Are they gonna cap me for that too? One month, I reached the 5gb cap WITHOUT any tethering, just because I was downloading apps, the newest Ubuntu distro, and tons of other crap. Where will be the limits as to what they can “prohibit”? Next thing you know, you’ll only be allowed on facebook, your RSS feeds, and youtube.

  • Anonymous

    Hey wireless tether app developer, Post your app to apptown.com so we can continue to enjoy.

  • Kenny

    I think the message the carriers are trying to send is clear.

    “Don’t like our rules? Have fun being stuck in the stone age.”

  • jim

    I use Wireless Tether from google code on my defy. http://code.google.com/p/android-wifi-tether/

  • You can still download Wireless Tether from it’s google code page and put it on your phone manually http://code.google.com/p/android-wifi-tether/

  • On a separate note, Lifehacker has a way to get around carrier blocked apps.

    http://lifehacker.com/#!5758134/how-to-easily-install-carrier+blocked-apps-like-pdanet-from-the-android-market

    If you don’t use your phone for your main internet connection, I doubt they’ll know the difference between light laptop usage and hard cell phone usage.

  • Ok, just to kill this off now… Directly from the Verizon Wireless Terms of Service and Acceptable Use Policy…

    Unlimited Smartphone and BlackBerry Plans and Features
    These WirelessEmail plans and features cannot be used: (1) for access to the Internet, intranets or other data networks except as the device’s native applications and capabilities permit, unless you subscribe to Mobile Broadband Connect; or (2) for any applications that tether your device to laptops or personal computers other than for use of the Wireless Sync or the BlackBerry solution, unless you subscribe to Mobile BroadbandConnect.

    And there it is… “device’s native applications and capabilities permit” which means if you have to install a 3rd party APK to get it to work – it’s not allowed…

  • klee2000

    These carriers are a bunch of these they make it seem like we’re stealing when it’s truly them. I pay for unlimited they call it unlimited but its actually caped. That’s slick it still is unlimited even when you are doing 63kbs. As bad as it is they want you to pay extra how you use ur minutes. As long as we have these hackers and devs I will promote them because, they are the only one that care. I am so surprissed that these carriers have been aloud to suck our blood as long as they have. I have a galaxy tab that was meant to be used as a tab and a phone but these greedy carriers took the feature off so you can put more money in their pockets. They can suck my BA!!z I am going to tether as long as I can.

  • I’m with T-Mo, and my phone came with it pre-installed. I couldn’t uninstall it if I wanted to (I don’t want to).

  • Amazon Appstore ftw.

  • Actually, to use the ‘full service’ that the cable company offers, YOU DO have to have them install a DVR or Box in all the rooms. Sure, you can get the trickle down of freebie channels from your primary source, but you can’t record from a room with a splitter without the boxes… So, in a way, it is exactly the same. You can’t share your DVR without purchasing another DVR – or you can’t share your phone’s data connection without purchasing the rights to do so…

  • Anonymous

    Verizon is not allowed to do this, at least not on any of their LTE phones. As part of the cheap price they paid for the C block, they agreed to open platform restrictions.

    Part of those include that they can’t “block, degrade or interfere with the ability of users to download and utilize applications of their choosing”

    and

    they can’t “block…services that compete with the carriers own offerings”. i.e, tethering through the official hotspot app.

    and

    they can’t impose any additional charges (one-time or recurring) on customers who seek to applications outside of those provided by the carrier.

    source: http://www.howardforums.com/showthread.php/1714635-Verizon-is-violating-the-700-Mhz-open-platform-restrictions-already

  • You make a good point, but you realize that Comcast has a data threshold that they hold you to also… If you exceed 250GB in one month, they can/will terminate your service. Over 1 device, that’s almost impossible, but over a wireless network that is being shared, it becomes very possible.

    We have 2 laptops, a roku box and 2 phones that we use on Wi-Fi at home. We regularly use 120-150GB of data a month. If we shared our connection with the neighbors, we’d go over if they did the same.

    Your argument of the “Single Device, Limited Data Plan” is pretty good, but when these plans came out, there was no wireless tether. Verizon doesn’t soft cap you, unless you are tethered – which is Mobile Broadband Connect ($59.99 a month) and will not throttle you for exceeding 5GB if you are only using the device itself.

    The other thing to look at is that Verizon will throttle/disconnect you for using applications that are NOT approved – Skyfire, Opera, Crackle and other programs that use high amounts of data are not approved apps and they can cut you off for using them as well. They cut deals with other companies to draw you in and use that paid service instead.

  • 3 towers in less than a half mile? Really? They don’t space them that close together – and 1Mbps down is 3G speeds there… We all know WiMax doesn’t work indoors – which is why you got such awesome speeds outside.

    Take that combined with the fact that there are roughly 250-500k Verizon 4G users out there and approximately 10 times that in EVO/Epic and Clear users… I’ll take my stable 6down/1up 4G service at the deal I have right now any day.

  • Actually, its that magic term of ‘Mobile Broadband Connect’ is where the 5GB comes in to play. On Web/Email for smartphone (the $29.99 plan) there is no limit as long as you are using only the device and not tethering… Which is where this whole debate starts…

  • Tethering is still on Virgin Mobile Optimus V.

  • Nakizzzle805

    Custom rom 😉

  • Robert Olivas

    You can put your phone in air plain mode and turn on wifi. Go to the market and you should see some apps that are beign blocked. It works on lots of phones

  • The Samsung Galaxy Prevail on Boost Mobile has Wireless Tether

  • StephenFB

    I can no longer find it, but I do have it installed on my phone and it still works. Haven’t had any word/warning from my carrier either.

    Droid X / Verizon Wireless
    Rooted running Liberty 2.0.1

  • You can just sideload it…don’t be stupid.

    To be honest I didn’t even know this was on the market.

  • htc_bolted
  • Ryan C

    I have an OG Droid on 2.2.1 and Wireless Tether doesnt show up in the on phone market. However, Its interesting to see that Barnacle wifi does. And also in the browser market, Wireless Tether cannot be installed on my OG Droid, along with PDAnet, and Klink tethering. It seems most of the tethering option apps are disabled. The funny thing is tho, my Droid can still be selected for installing Barnicle Wifi. So maybe they just havent gotten to that one yet? but is definitely seems that something odd is going on with the tethering apps.

  • Hank

    PDANet still runs tethering on Virgin Mobile’s LG Optimus V!

  • http://code.google.com/p/android-wifi-tether/ I found it! Seriously, just download it from there. I’ve found the experimental one to be fine on my Droid X, but then again I do have free tethering built in on GB.

  • Tbolt

    I went to http://www.junefabrics.com/android/download.php and downloaded the .exe for my laptop. It installed PdaNet to my Laptop and Tbolt. I don’t plan on using this as a primary means of internet, but there may be a few occasions per year where I find myself with a laptop and no wifi or cable around.

  • Anonymous

    What’s stopping you from downloading the apk elsewhere?

    BOOM done

  • Interesting! I have a Nexus One on Tmobile and I, too, cannot install this app. It says it’s not available on my carrier.

    With a stock Froyo 2.3.3, though, I have the native tethering, which works just fine. Tmo doesn’t charge extra for tethering so maybe there’s another reason for blocking this app by carrier?

  • Totally UNsurprising

  • Pirujo

    ya nos chingaron, we fuct….!

  • Nbanicholas

    for people who forgot that google search exists: (wireless tether project page)

    http://code.google.com/p/android-wifi-tether/

  • Anonymous

    Just one more reason to stick with a jail broken iPhone!

    http://www.real-privacy.eu.tc

  • You can still download and sideload from the developer. It is not blocked to install manually, just not from the market. Barnacle is still available, but definitely not as good as Wireless Tether. To download from the developer, just click the link to go to the developers website from the Market.

  • It’s not the “Android Axe”. It’s the “Google Android Market Axe”.
    If your phone’s operating system allows for installs from outside the Android Market, as most OSes based on Android do, no service provider (e.g. Google or your Carrier) have any rights (and will probably not try) to remove these apps from your device.

  • Spc Hicks09

    Not available on the Market for the OG Droid anymore but thankfully I have the .apk on my phone, my laptop, my external AND my desktop lol. Watch me tether till my phone falls apart!

  • d

    i found a workaround to this in about 4 seconds. anyone complaining needs to man up and lrn2google.

  • APK

    If carriers start blocking apps from the Android Market then maybe they’ll show up in Amazon’s App Store or just be downloadable through the developer’s website.

  • Uh Oh

    pdanet is missing too.

  • I used to have Alltel, but since I switched to AT&T I noticed it was removed from the market. You can easily grab it from http://code.google.com/p/android-wifi-tether/ and install the APK, that’ll never go away. I have a 2GB cap from AT&T and I’ve used tethering in a pinch once or twice this month. I see myself as a fairly heavy user and I’ve only touched 700MB.

  • Scea67

    The apk file is out there for anyone who wants it! I love wireless tether!! And will continue to use it , the cell companies get enough of my money

  • Anonymous

    What’s next? Blocking google voice from providing free sms?

  • Heres the link for the apk from google http://code.google.com/p/android-wifi-tether/downloads/list?can=2&q=Generic if you need to side load it

  • i use barnacle as well. its amazing. I am currently stationed in Kuwait and I use barnacle all the time. I easily use over 10Gb a month and Verizon hasnt said a single thing to me. I even use Skype here and I have my cell phone number as the caller ID and I dont ever get charged minutes. I still get unlimited M2M mintues!!

  • Anonymous

    Barnacle is still available in the market, and I even find it to work better than Wireless Tether… Continue with your day…

    • Anonymous

      Also, I do not feel half-bad doing this as I only use it in places where I don’t have wi-fi such as my work (where the internet was disabled), and around my campus when I’m not near a classroom or the library there isn’t wi-fi everywhere so I use it. I don’t use it to download anything usually, and I rarely get even close to my 5GB “cap” (unlimited data here..). I will continue to tether when needed and I will tether my Asus Transformer once I get it.

  • Drcashman

    I think people seem to forget when cable modems first came out most cable systems only allowed one computer to be hooked up to it and charged you extra for another IP address . But when routers became cheaper I wanted to buy one but heard that my cable company (Media One) was blocking you from using them. they were locking the connection to the mac address of the computer the installer set it up on and they forbid it in the TOS. But as new routers allowed you to clone the mac address more and more and more people started using them and eventually the cable company allowed it and even started to install them. I think this will happen with the phone companies no matter how much they try to stop it.

  • For what it’s worth, sometimes you can install blocked app from the web Market if you remove your SIM card, connect to wifi, then try to install the app.

  • Anon

    Good! I’m glad this is happening. Those of you illegally tethering are the reason phones are getting locked down. You are why rooting is getting such a bad rap. Pay for what you use.

    • a good article on why charging us for tethering is bullcrap:
      http://www.carrypad.com/2011/04/05/on-tethering-a-response-to-james-kendrick/all/1/

      Also even if no one ever tethers Verizon and other carriers are always going to try and stop people rooting their phones and doing things carriers don’t want us doing. eg. removing data throttling, removing bloatware, putting on custom roms.
      It’s all about control and money and nothing to do with any specific one thing that people are doing.

  • Anonymous

    Is paying for tethering the same as paying twice for my land line because my 14.4 modem uses it to connect to the interwebs? 😛

  • Wtm1417

    shhh dont tell verizon but bluetooth still works. You cant download it in the market though. Google wireless tether. Rooted Droid X on gingerbread

  • JP

    Market is allowing me to install Wireless Tether to my rooted Nook Color, not that that would do a lot of good since it doesn’t have 3G…

    Has anyone actually been contacted by Verizon about violation of contract for tethering when you don’t get anywhere near the 5GB limit of “unlimited”?

    • MOTOX

      nope. Im on 6.5 for this month so far, and tommorow’s the last day of the month so it’l be 7 gigs, 2 gigs of tethering.

  • Anonymous

    No biggie. I think I have tethered less than five times. Most places I go have free wifi. I have the app now and I am sure you can find it online.
    I still don’t see it as “stealing data” if I don’t share it and am not using it entirely as my personal internet access. I pay for internet access at home from another provider.
    I do understand that the people who abuse it are the problem and I would defend a carrier who closed the exploit because it was taxing servers and causing interruptions in service to those who pay.
    Otherwise, this is no big friggen deal to me.

  • The good news (unless carriers figure out ways to block this too. I’m talking to you AT&T!) is that the apk can be downloaded from Google Code and sideloaded onto a rooted device. Take that carriers! 😀

    http://code.google.com/p/android-wifi-tether/downloads/list

  • MOTOX

    Just saying people, tether is an extra paid feature on all carriers…so technically although greedy of course, they do have the right to block you….you can still have unlimited data on verizon for use on your phone or if you have the app already you can still use it….and have unlimited data, they just don’t want you to use that extra data or pay them for the tether feature…I do get what your saying though. Ugh, come on google, take some action!

  • MOTOX

    Actually i just found it on my thunderbolt. update: on my 2nd one, it is now not found…..but i can’t think this is verizon yet…every other android tether is still found on my first thunderbolt. I am using 3g….not in 4g. just saying.

  • nanogeek
  • Emu

    Still shows up for my Optimus V on Virgin Mobile.

  • Anonymous

    Barnacle is still available

  • Azndan4

    Unlimited data is advertised as just that — unlimited data. Having a 5 gb/month cap makes it FALSE ADVERTISING. Don’t let them get away with false advertising. I’ll feel bad about breaking the contract when they feel bad about breaking the law.

  • Azndan4

    Unlimited data is advertised as just that — unlimited data. Having a 5 gb/month cap makes it FALSE ADVERTISING. Don’t let them get away with false advertising. I’ll feel bad about breaking the contract when they feel bad about breaking the law.

  • Looked on my Droid X just now. Wireless Tether app not showing.

  • If this will stop the carriers from trying to block root or locking the bootloaders. I’m all for stopping free tethering. I used to tether some. I’ve removed the app.

  • Anonymous

    OH GOD WHAT WILL I DO NOW?

    Oh, right, sideloading.

  • Jbrock98

    No wireless tether in my market (DX) but I still have barnacle, haven’t used it since my OGdroid days, what if u still have a wireless tether apk does it still work?

  • i tether on my inspire 4g everyday for my friends at school cause the school blocks their wifi, att still hasnt informed me that i have been charged… maybe that is because they use a total of 5 mb a day? and atm i only used 400mb out of 2gb

  • Welcome aboard the Android train, I hopped you’ve enjoyed your pleasant ride so far, however we are now pulling into Appleville.

  • Anonymous
  • Can’t find it – D2G

  • oh no, now i’ll have to sideload it, use barnacle, the built in CM7 tether, or any of the other 7 options…

  • Ipissuoff

    Wow people are ridiculous. Unlimited means unlimited…no matter how you use it.

    But I mean they charge for text messaging for crying out loud…so carriers being greedy as hell is nothing new. Maybe they should charge for email too.

  • Anonymous

    mine’s grayed out too…but only because when i hover my cursor over my device, it says it’s already installed…

  • Poena69

    can’t you side load it?

  • Anonymous

    i can still download it? and cant you just download it from a nonmarket source and put it on your sd card?!

  • I’m a little confused…. If you have froyo or later, why not just enable your WiFi Hotspot that is a part of the OS instead of using an app?

    • Because only AOSP Froyo has the Wifi hotspot app. All of the carrier-based ROM’s have removed it. But as long as you’re running CM7 or something of that sort, this isn’t an issue.

  • Anonymous

    Can’t get it for my tbolt anymore. Thank god for my titanium backup of it!

  • T S

    Still available on my Viewsonic Gtablet, but not Droid. Of course, the tablet doesn’t have 3G.

  • SIDELOAD we dont need the market for that! hell if were already rooting to do it then why not at that point

  • Anonymous

    This is slightly annoying. I hadn’t even thought of Wireless Tether for the longest time.

    IIRC, they have a google code page so you can install it manually. URL: http://code.google.com/p/android-wifi-tether/downloads/list

    Also just to throw my two cents in the ring, as long as you aren’t sharing your connection out to devices that aren’t yours/in your household I don’t see how/why the carriers care. Well, that’s not true, I do see why. Since cell phone came into existence they have called it unlimited because every phone sucked and data speeds sucked. Up until smartphones came along. And even then, tethering was hard to do and data speeds still sucked. It is just now in this age of easy to use smart phones, easy to install apps, and decent data (even on Verizon which has the slowest 3G network I can get 2Mb down with a ping of ~120ms. I would have killed for that speed less than 10yrs ago. There are people on DSL with lower speeds than that.

    But that isn’t my problem. The carriers weren’t forward thinking and now it is coming back to bite them. I have said a few times that I don’t mind if they changed the data to be limited, as long as the prices and caps were reasonable (IMO 3GB for $30 is fairly reasonable to me). And if they didn’t limit how I used the data.

  • Anonymous

    So, if you already have it on your phone, will they somehow be able to disable it or begin charging you for it? I only use it occasionally when I have no other option, but I certainly don’t want to pay a ton extra every month just in case I might need it!

  • VZW can lick my arse – 9GB of data usage all on device not tethering. Next month my goal is 18GB – Its getting harder to double. Might need to rethink my doubling strategy.

  • Rodys7

    Found& installed an app via AppBrain market

  • Mr. Steve

    Wireless Tether is gone because the dev is working on a new app that’s better. At least that’s what I hear.

    • Guest

      It’s still there, the dev is just done updating and is working on a new app that will only tether over wi-fi. Don’t quote me on the wi-fi part though.

  • Anonymous

    Stealing data my ass (comment not for Kellex). Douchebags nickel and diming you to death is what this is all about. Phones come ready to roll and carriers figure out ways to stick their greedy hands into your pocket for more. You pay for the phone, the phone service, the data service and if that’s not bad enough, an extra fee for the data service across your own device. You pay for unlimited service and they lock you into a contract only to change the terms half way through. Horsehockey. Lying sacks of used car salesmen bollocks. Beautiful thing is that it all comes around and I’ll dance a jig when they lose their shirts.

    • You PAY for all the products and features you want? WOAH WHAT A NOVEL CONCEPT!!! What a revolutionary new business model! Thanks for enlightening me!!

      • Anonymous

        I’m all for paying per service and I totally get your response, I simply have a problem with paying for every little aspect of the SAME service. How many times should I pay for data? I paid for the phone, ok. I paid for the cell service, ok. I paid for a data package so I can surf and email. Fine. I pay for the same data package with a cap so I can surf on my iPad using the SAME DATA? C’mon. When cells were found to have the ability to be used as modems (long ago, galaxy far away) companies tried to squash the idea, then they figured out how to make money out of it and bammo, new “service”. My problem is that the so called service is a built in feature of the phone that is crippled by the carrier, not the phone manufacturer. It’s the same data stream from the same carrier just routed differently and thereby fair game for my whole nickel and dime comment. I also believe the charges we incur for these services are bloated. Yes, I pay for them as long as I want to use them, but that doesn’t make them fair, doesn’t make it right, and certainly isn’t going to make me applaud them for their prowess in business.

  • Zero Cypher

    I was able to find it in the market from my phone.

    Sprint
    Epic 4G

  • Temp123

    Can’t you just use appbrain or Amazon to get the app? CM7 comes with Barnacle Wifi Tether. Hiding the apps is not going to be effective.

    • Justinb

      barnacle is still on the market i just checked. wireless tether was not

  • Ad0131065

    good thing i already have it and have it backed up.

  • It cant be stealing data im paying for it

    • no read your terms of service your paying for data on your phone not other devices

  • dblj

    I had it on my OG but could never get it to work.

  • Gee

    I would also like to point out that pda_net has also been blocked. That is a non-rooted wired tether app.

  • Makes me happy I snagged the APK from google codes. *hint hint*

  • Daniel

    Needless war wongering.

    “Wireless tether” is a app for rooted phones only. People who know how to root their phones couldn’t care less if this app is on the Android Market. They can get it elsewhere on the web.

    Its still very difficult for carriers to block tethering. Especially on Android phones. Android phones can run practically everything a PC can. Data looks the same. Eventually they’ll probably do it, but its not the best use of their time. Rather than impose unnatural restrictions on how people use their data, they will need to cap the data, but hopefully at reasonably large amounts. I hope carriers don’t fall into the trap of other industries who fail to grasp the changing times and try to protect old business models while failing to see new opportunities. RIAA and MPAA have lost the entire market for music and movies by failing to embrace digital media, instead trying to unreasonably restrict users use of their purchased content. I hope carriers don’t do the same thing, trying to control what you do with your data, instead of seeing the possibilities of a widely available high speed data access.

  • John

    While I disagree, I understand the Carrier’s POV. You purchased an unlimited data plan FOR YOUR PHONE. Not your PC, not your Tablet, not any other device.. just for your phone. Just because your phone allows other devices access to it’s 3G connection, doesn’t mean you have the right to use your data for other devices.

    • Anonymous

      Was that in the contract you signed?

  • Schoat333

    Thats fine, ill just use my phone for everything now, and make sure to max out my data every month. 😉

    • Anonymous

      Turning wifi off…….now!

    • jason w.s.

      Ever heard the saying “Some jerks always gotta go ruin it for the rest of us” ? …………hows it goin jerk. ;-P

  • Gsletta

    I dont like the added charge but i can see why they are doing it. You pay 30 dollars a month for your phone to have unlimited data, but as soon as you start using that data for another device, you are breaking the TOS and now you are trying to get unlimited data on 2+ devices for the price of one.

  • Craigg

    I have had wireless tether installed on my rooted D2 Global and it still works flawlessly. I only use the tethering occasionally and there is no way I will pay $60 monthly for that option.

  • Emike72

    Your phone’s data plan is for, wait for it, your phone. Not for your computer, game console and everything else you can tether to. Apps like Wireless Tether are used to circumvent plans for broadband and mifi. It’s a load of dung to call carriers greedy on this issue when your the one cheating them. This is one of those very few instances where I fall on the carriers side. Quit acting like everything you tether to is covered by your phone’s plan. It never was.

  • Anonymous

    I do not consider tethering stealing data. You are merely transfering data to a laptop; etc. If you go over an agreed amount of data and gt it for free, or if you somehow tap someone elses data that they pay for and now you get it for free, that is stealing..

    • Bunie

      Yeah. Networks are just greedy. i have an unlimited data plan on my phone, and my phone is using the data. Just because its traveling thru the phone into my laptop doesn’t mean its “stealing”. its still my phone that’s downloading all the data that i was promised would be Unlimited.

      • Homer_J_S

        Should companies allow tethering under an unlimited data plan? I believe yes, with some reasonable limits. Do I wish companies allowed it? Yes. What baffles me, however, is the view that it’s not stealing. If the contract says tethering is prohibited and violates the contract. If so, it IS stealing when you do it. This isn’t rocket science. And, why do people hang onto the word “UNLIMITED” in their contract but ignore the tethering prohibition. You violate the tethering restriction, why can’t the phone company violate the “unlimited” term and condition? Why is your clause more important?

        • Anonymous

          I don’t see why people think violating a term in a contract = larceny.

        • Newslet

          You answered your own question. You said that thethering has a “prohibition” and a “restriction”, which are by definition, limits. Thus, it is not unlimited data. It has limits.

          • Homer_J_S

            Semantics games aside, we all know “unlimited” applies to data use only for the phone on the account. It is, in fact, unlimited for 1 device.

            P.S. I would have responded quicker but my tether app disconnected and my laptop froze. Had to reboot and start over. 🙂

        • Anonymous

          They already were violating by slowing down data speeds.

      • Anonymous

        Exactly, it’s like What if I install a torrent app or use FTP to get a 4GB iso onto my SD card then transfer via USB, compared to just connecting via USB/WiFi either way just used 4GB… ubuntu DVD for example…

        What difference would it make where the bits go/how they get there, if it’s USB/WiFi or SD Card, all adds up to the same bandwidth/data transfer…

        By definition anyone who downloads an email Attachment to their SD card then displays it on a TV or transfers it to a PC via USB is stealing too… as much as usb/bt/wifi tether is…

    • DBK

      Not really. The connection is a direct one. The data isn’t going from the radio through the phone to the other device, it’s going from the radio directly to the other device. The phone isn’t using that data at all.

      • Bunie

        Your wrong here. It goes through the phone.

      • Gsletta

        If you’ve ever used wireless tether, it clearly shows the data that your phone consumes to connect the devices

        • Bunie

          Yeah it does the math, it knows what its sending through the usb. whats your point? lol

          • Gsletta

            my point is the phone is using the data….

  • Badassbosoxfan

    Does this apply to wired tethers also? Such as PDA net?

    • Bunie

      This is whats being refered to. im not sure if its blocked from being installed or just blocked on the market.

  • Bunie

    PDANet can still be installed over ADB or via the APK right? They cant block that without updating the rom to do so. (I think?)

  • Breadthousand

    Just use cm7, has wireless and USB tether built in!

  • Anonymous

    I just tried to wifi tether my Xoom to my DX running .4588 and it wont obtain an IP address. I don’t know if the issue is with the Xoom or the DX but it used to work just fine.

    Of note – when I started wifi tether app, it also loaded the official verizon wifi tether app at the same time. Tsk Tsk verizon getting sneaky.

  • Heavydroiduser

    So let me get this strait…..
    Viewing a web page on the phone itself…fine.
    Viewing the same web page on a device tethered to the phone….stealing data?!?!?

    • Review the contract that you signed… Which is in the contract and which isn’t?

  • Anonymous

    1>>>I don’t think people have entitlement issues, but I for one am tired of paying the same data fee for each device on the same account. I pay a data fee for my phone, for my xoom, for my wifes phone. If they are saying we can’t tether, at least give us a darn discount on the data prices when we are using multiple devices.

    2>>>The problem is that the phone is a router/modem all rolled into one.Verizon previously locked down their devices to prevent all of this, but when Android came along they had to make a choice. They couldn’t have Android and locked phones. The chose open and android.

    3>>> On the contrary, the data the phone uses is just like any other device. The phone doesn’t compress data. If I stream music on my phone at 320kbps, that is what I hear. The phone is just another networked device. Of course voice traffic is compressed but not straight data. Verizon has millions of devices on its network and I wouldn’t exactly call it bogged down.

  • Anonymous

    1>>>I don’t think people have entitlement issues, but I for one am tired of paying the same data fee for each device on the same account. I pay a data fee for my phone, for my xoom, for my wifes phone. If they are saying we can’t tether, at least give us a darn discount on the data prices when we are using multiple devices.

    2>>>The problem is that the phone is a router/modem all rolled into one.Verizon previously locked down their devices to prevent all of this, but when Android came along they had to make a choice. They couldn’t have Android and locked phones. The chose open and android.

    3>>> On the contrary, the data the phone uses is just like any other device. The phone doesn’t compress data. If I stream music on my phone at 320kbps, that is what I hear. The phone is just another networked device. Of course voice traffic is compressed but not straight data. Verizon has millions of devices on its network and I wouldn’t exactly call it bogged down.

    • DBK

      1) That I can agree with.

      2) It’s only a router when the hotspot feature is used. Otherwise it’s a modem.

      3) When you play games like WoW through the network, or tether your PS3/360 to the network and play COD, or use it for hardcore business, then it does. More often than not, people abuse the network that way and that is what is causing the problems.

      • Anonymous

        i think we should be allowed to tether, but I also feel like you do that tethering computers to run WOW, consoles, etc is abuse. It is those small percentages who usually ruin it for the rest of us.

  • This is kinda stupid. Wireless tether requires root and custom kernel anyway. So people who do this stuff will be able to install WT from other sources than market. This way or another…
    Before being submitted to market WT was built in into ROMs.

  • Tried using it on Liberty GB on my DX yesterday and had no luck. If you can get the connection with the handset from your computer, you get a roadblock screen from VZ in the browser asking if you want to subscribe to mobile tethering. What a pain.

  • gimlet72

    I think the bigger issue is the ability for carries to block certain apps in the Market. What if Verizon wants to start blocking competing applications such as navigation. At least with the Droid X you can install apps that are not from the market. My co-worker has an HTC from ATT and cannot do that (she is not rooted).

    • Homer_J_S

      You do understand they’re blocking an app that allows you to circumvent the terms and conditions of the contract you signed? Tethering apps are not competing apps like Google Maps vs. other navigators. A more reasonable question is “why block the app now after all this time?”

  • Anonymous

    I’ve used 40 GB on Verizon before in one month just to test the waters and I was not charged any overage! So unlimited on Verizon is unlimited at least for now. I now regularly use between 10-15GB a month. Hurry GRANDFATHER those Unlimited plans people! Sprint claims that they will never limit you but this is not true when they began to see there network crumble into pieces like AT&T did they will start to limit.

    • Anonymous

      If you’re using that much data please realize you’re what’s causing this situation. People who tether on rare occasions and don’t use unreasonable amounts of data aren’t the problem – people who download 10x the amount of an average user are.

  • AC

    I tell you man there is alot of comments on this situation. Here is my input on this matter if you going to put a block one, might as well block’em all. Now I don’t support the blocking of any app, except malware and virus of course. Yes it seems that Verizon may be going the way off At&t like their doing with the iPhone and it’s tethering apps.

    There is also old saying goes like this: If there is a will, there is a way!!! I am sure it will be found. One more comment also if going to bust on Android and iOS, you better bust on them all?!!

  • Anonymous

    I’m a little confused. Even if they are blocking the download from the Market, they can’t prevent a user from going to Wireless Tether’s Google Code page and downloading/sideloading the application. Have we determined if they can tell the difference between “tethered data” and normal on-phone data?

  • Eric

    Can someone explain to me how they can block the free tether app but not the ones you pay for? HMM. Sounds like just the loophole we need to win that lawsuit.

  • Eric

    Can someone explain to me how they can block the free tether app but not the ones you pay for? HMM. Sounds like just the loophole we need to win that lawsuit.

  • New_Guy

    Apparently Barnacle is still there…I would scoop it up just to have it for later if necessary. I did 🙂

    • LionStone

      yep, just did….

  • Guest
  • Anonymous

    AND this is why I still have my OG Droid! rooted with Wireless Tether 🙂

  • Bjzbd

    I just tried and it automatically sends me to a web site for Verizon telling me I can sign up for Hot spot access. Interesting never happened before. Both on Wireless Tether and the Hacked Hot Spot app from Team Black Hat.

    • Anonymous

      What phone are you using? See if it does the same thing with bluetooth tethering.

      • Bjzbd

        Droid X

  • Niteperson

    Here we go again…

    Your data plan pertains ONLY to the device your plan is on, i.e. your smartphone. Despite what you feel it SHOULD allow, it does not allow you share that data with different devices. Plain and simple. Any other interpretation is wrong.

    You knew that when you signed the contract, and now everyone is trying to justify what is, quite literally, stealing bandwidth. Getting free internet on your computer is not, and probably never will be, part of your smartphone data contract.

    • Contract aside, your argument doesn’t hold water. Lets put it this way. We OWN our devices period, not the carrier. The service we pay for is to connect the device to the carrier’s network allowing the device to function for voice and data. But what’s on the device is OURS because we OWN that device. Where the contents of said device go after it’s arrived on the device is NOT in control of the carrier because they don’t own it. They only own the connection between the device and their network. A wifi hotspot is on OUR network not theirs because it exists between two or more devices in which WE own. We pay for the pipe between the carrier and the device NOT the pipe between the device and any other devices.

      There simply is NO valid argument for free wifi tethering other than that we signed that right away when we signed our contracts. Take the contract out the picture and there simply is NO argument valid for charging for this service PERIOD.

      • But… you DID sign that contract. So where’s your argument?

    • Anonymous

      this is a pretty tired statement considering they can change the terms of the plans at anytime. I really have no way of verifying that tethering was prohibited when I signed my contract. I know it explicity prohibits it, but not in the way you are suggesting. The exact wording on the subject clearly references tethering:

      Unlimited Smartphone and BlackBerry Plans and Features
      These WirelessEmail plans and features cannot be used: (1) for access to the Internet, intranets or other data networks except as the device’s native applications and capabilities permit, unless you subscribe to Mobile Broadband Connect; or (2) for any applications that tether your device to laptops or personal computers other than for use of the Wireless Sync or the BlackBerry solution, unless you subscribe to Mobile BroadbandConnect.

      After reading that if you’re tethering to a tablet or video game console you might be just inside the ToS. Not sure what “native applications” means but if wireless tether is on my phone that’s native to me.

      • DBK

        I know for a fact that mine is more explicit than that on the subject. When I find it, I will post it up.

        • Anonymous

          It’s possible that it’s different for differen’t markets but that’s straight off the verizonwireless website. Still, given that they can change it at anytime, the actual wording probably doesn’t mean too much.

        • Anonymous

          It’s possible that it’s different for differen’t markets but that’s straight off the verizonwireless website. Still, given that they can change it at anytime, the actual wording probably doesn’t mean too much.

  • Anonymous

    Glad I’m with Sprint. Also glad the Market isn’t the only place to get apps

  • Can you sideload the app? I hope someone sues these carriers, its our data that we pay out the ass for and we should be able to use it as we please. This is the equivalent to the isp trying to charge extra for using a home WiFi for multiple devices back in the 90s. And I hope Google’s stance about Android OS and the carriers monkey.g around with it hold true. The carriers disable wireless tethering, which is free, but they charge you. BS

  • DBK

    Oh man, here we go again:

    1) The unlimited data you pay for is only for the phone’s use. It’s in the contract you signed. If you signed the contract, and then you tether, your stealing. You don’t like it, then don’t sign the contract. Sounds like some people have entitlement issues.

    2) Stop comparing the phone to a router, because there is no comparison. The phone is not a router, it’s a modem (unless you use the hotspot feature (of course that means paying)). Since you cannot hook up more than one device to a modem directly, what makes you think the phone is any different? That is what the router is for (which would mean the hotspot feature or mifi).

    3) The data your phone uses isn’t the same data your other devices use. Other devices eat it up faster and it is not as compressed as it is on the phone, thus using said devices would end up bogging down the network.

    It sucks, but that is what you agreed to. Like I said, you don’t like it, don’t sign the contract and go to another carrier. Simple.

    • Petersen5

      A tablet would compress the data like a phone then correct? And my internet provider only gave me a modem but I’m using my router to make it wireless and able to go to more then one thing wired so am I stealing from them to?

      • DBK

        Missed the point completely. Using a router is fine. It would be like using the hotspot or mifi. But tethering is the same as hacking a modem to be able to hook up more than one device directly to it.

        Phone = modem, not router.

        I’ll give you the tablets though, since they should.

        • Anonymous

          I don’t see how he missed the point. If you’re saying your phone is the modem, then by your logic, should I have to pay Comcast to have a router to share my connection to more than one PC? Installing a router gives you the ability to share the connection, just like using the mifi or tether app. I’m not arguing the morality of it in the least, but the whole argument of this being any different than having a router for your home internet connection is fine but thetering is stealing seems very very flawed.

          Its all semantics from top to bottom.

        • HolyUnity

          Not true, I design software that we use in netgear routers, and essentially that is what the Wireless Tether is. The app itself IS THE ROUTER.

          When you bring home a router the hardware case is nothing, its the software that runs it. In this case the software just happens to get installed on the phone without the need of hardware case.

    • Anonymous

      If the data is going to the phone and then to another device, it’s still going through the phone and being consumed by the phone. This may be arguing semantics but as long as the phone is the device receiving the data, it shouldn’t matter how it ultimately transfers that data to other devices. If I choose to download a movie and then manually transfer it to my computer through the USB or through a cloud service am I still in breach of contract? It has the same ultimate effect, just using a different medium to transfer the data (wifi vs usb or 3G)

      • DBK

        Not really, since there is another device/medium being used. Using a usb cable or a cloud service (which would probably utilize some sort of router) is different from transferring the data directly from the network .

    • STiK

      I have to agree. You as a consumer signed the contract. If you didn’t like the terms then you shouldn’t have signed it. I don’t necessarily consider it stealing data, you are just using it much faster than most portable devices would use it which can bog down the network. Regardless, you are in breech of contract by tethering without a tether plan and are in the wrong.

    • Mistafreeze

      The data is the exact same data. It’s no more or less compressed than any other data sent over the http protocol. Mobile sites tend to be smaller, but thats it. Any compression being done at the tower or elsewhere applies to all data sent and recieved from the phone.

      I love my Sprint Unlimited. Good connection, and they have no issue with me tethering and using 30/Gb a month.

      Bandwidth is perishable. They either use it or they don’t. You can’t save it. Tethering doesn’t add stress to the network. Period.

  • frenchy

    WIFI Xoom and OG DROID both still show it in the market. And my phone still teathers my xoom just fine…. verizon

  • Teri

    You’re paying for unlimited access to the data on your phone. Adding other devices taxes the carrier’s system, which is why they want you to pay for it. If everyone had that mindset “well unlimited is unlimited” then everyone tethering to 5 different devices would put a lot more strain on the network. If you’re going to strain it, you’re going to help maintain it with your $$. The more you know.

    • Anonymous

      That isn’t true. Those 5 devices have to divide the bandwidth provided by the phone. You aren’t using 5x the amount of data, you’re using the same amount split 5 way. The only way it puts strain is that it makes it easier to use the bandwidth and people spend more time with it.

      Unlimited 4G without wireless tether will most likely use a lot more bandwidth than 3G with tethering simly because it’s actually able to move data faster.

    • Anonymous

      That isn’t true. Those 5 devices have to divide the bandwidth provided by the phone. You aren’t using 5x the amount of data, you’re using the same amount split 5 way. The only way it puts strain is that it makes it easier to use the bandwidth and people spend more time with it.

      Unlimited 4G without wireless tether will most likely use a lot more bandwidth than 3G with tethering simly because it’s actually able to move data faster.

    • Anonymous

      Install tether, download a file on the single phone connection. Note the speed. Connect 5 other devices to the tether. Have all 6 devices download the file at the same time. Note the speed on each device. Its not 6x the bandwidth. Its the same bandwidth split 6 different ways. 6 times the data consumed when all files are complete, yes, but It doesn’t tax the network anymore than using the single phone to download that same file a single time.

      Its not like the carriers themselves have a set amount of universal data for their customers to use. Verizon isn’t gonna run out of geebeez for me to use. Your logic is flawed.

  • Sruel3216

    root explorer/data/app/wireless tether

    copy apk

    move to sd card

    install after loading a new rom

    problem solved

    • Teri

      not if you’re on GB 🙂

  • Ryoh

    Waht about apps like PDAnet? They can’t block that can they>

  • Stang30290

    I would only use it on my wifi XOOM but I can bluetooth tether it to my dx and use all the data I want. Is Verizon going to stop bluetooth tethering too.

  • MachineGun68

    I’m with you…FINE..give me a 5GB cap…but let me use it how I see fit. Wireless tether has allowed me to do my job in places that did not have Wi-Fi available or a network to plug into.

    • DBK

      Or you could just use the hotspot feature on your phone.

    • MK17

      Can I like this more?

      Do that or let Verizon give us wireless tether and cap it at say 1Gb. I only use it when there is no other source of internet, and everywhere I go practically has internet. The only place i use it is on road trips and at the deer lease where there is no internet.

      Come on Verizon, for once do us a solid and do something that makes the consumer not feel bitter.

  • Google “Wireless tether root” and then you can download the .apk
    Install and runs as normal. Did it yesterday when i couldnt find it in the app market

  • Bb

    Those bitches!

  • Anonymous

    ok, that just blew it for me, i can deal with vzw saying we cant root devices, no free tether, etc, but when they start blocking apps on an OPEN SOURCE platform, that makes them no better than apple or that friggin iwhore. I think this is the straw that’ll break the camels back with me and VZW, and i used to WORK for them…..

    Take my root – I’ll be upset but still doing it
    take my wireless tether – I’ll find another way
    block apps from my phone – I’ll will DESTROY you

    ok, my rant is done, sorry

  • Anonymous

    PDA Net is blocked on Verizon. I couldn’t install it when I switched from my OG Droid to Thunderbolt, meaning that the market didn’t sync it automatically like my other apps did.

  • Kamikaze4

    I live in an subdivision affected by the tornados in St. Louis a week ago today. My house wasn’t leveled like some in the neighborhood, and is, in fact, still livable. However, our whole neighborhood’s cable internet has been knocked out for a week and counting. Wireless tether is the only reason my wife could coordinate her job interviews this week, as she lost her job the week before the tornado. Was a ban on its use in the contract we signed? Probably, I haven’t checked. But there is no legitimate reason to disallow its usage– if they don’t let us tether, I will just use the internet directly on the phone, using just as much bandwidth as I would have otherwise used, with literally ZERO extra effort from them, but a lot of extra effort for me. I am not a fan of strict government regulation, but I would certainly back legislation requiring carriers to let you use your phone as you like, with bandwidth you’ve already paid for.

  • Anonymous

    Everyone leave their carriers and go to MetroPCS. They have 4G LTE (I’m assuming on Verizon’s Network – since they’re the only ones who have it?) They have TRUELY unlimited EVERYTHING. Talk, Web, Data, etc. for $60 on 4G LTE. Bet they aren’t pulling this shit.

    • DBK

      To bad their coverage sucks….

      • Anonymous

        Well, looking at their coverage map and where their LTE spots are, etc… It looks fairly decent, if not on par with others? Idk, maybe it’s just me.

  • greedy bastiges!

  • Anonymous

    I don’t think carriers will ever successfully block tethering, wireless or wired. Data is data is data. There should be no way they can detect whether it’s the phone using the connection or a device attached to the phone (since the phone manages the whole connection).

    They can try to block us and unfairly charge extra for tethering, but the dev community will always come out on top in ensuring that our data usage remains unencumbered from the likes of corporate greed.

  • Anonymous

    So, if I’m sending a signal over bluetooth with WiFi tether, can they detect that? That’s how I connect to my XOOM.

  • NetworkPIMP

    Srsly, folks…

    Step 1: watch this week’s South Park

    Step 2: read the contract you signed with your carrier – or, if out of contract, read their ToS to which you agree by default in the course of having service

    Step 3: cry some more…

    like I’ve said – I think it stinks to high heaven too… but all the “me too” posts are useless noise… sideload the .apk at your own risk … hope you don’t get busted … if you do… suck it up.

    • Im tired of hearing “stop complaining, those were the terms, suck it up”. whether it’s here abt android, or about anything in our society in general..

      if we never expressed our dissatisfaction towards current policies, particularly unreasonable, abusive ones, they will never change for the better.

      as little weight as an internet’s “me too” post is, the sheer mass ur able to reach across the internet can actually spread some significant knowledge and education on how to react individually and ultimately as a community across the nation, or the even across the world and have a significant impact. And by hearing what others plan to, or already have done to retaliate against unfair policies can encourage themselves to finally take action.

      Take moto’s bootloader “Whiners”. Constantly told to “Stop Complaining, it’s not going to change anything”. yet in the past week or so, it’s been on every android news site and other tech sites about how there were 20,000 votes on Moto’s Facebook demanding unlocked bootloaders under a prompted Question for something unrelated. The moment you shutup about it, is the moment they dismiss the issue.

  • Anonymous

    I’m using the stock tethering on my Inspire 4G, and will continue. You have to ensure that you are going through the correct gateway or else you WILL get caught. Period.

  • DroidzFX

    Your not getting anymore bandwidth than you would get on your phone.You just may use that connection longer than you would on your phone. I for one suggest a 10GB cap to include tethering. This will allow you to enjoy your connection the way you want while negating the users who abuse the “unlimited network”.

  • Leykamp

    Here is the solution, you use the power of your dollar and take your business to Verizon. People need to be more aware that all these companies work for US, the consumer, and if enough people say, “I think this sucks you may no longer have my money” THEN and only then will things change for the better for consumers as a whole. NOW CUE UP THE STAR SPANGLED BANNER!

  • I’m tethering right now! Oh yeah…

  • rob

    Still able to tether my d1 cm7.2 to my wifi xoom. ……thank god

  • Someguywholiketacos

    I want a Taco.

    • Jamesdoulane

      Nice reference, lol.

  • Homer_J_S

    I fully understand the argument that “hey, I pay for unlimited data, who cares what device I use” (phone or laptop). That said, aren’t the terms and conditions of your cell contract clear that wireless tethering is not allowed? You didn’t just buy unlimited data, x minutes, and y SMS. You bought your service with terms and conditions. YOU signed a contract with the full knowledge that tethering is not allowed. Do you also go to an all-you-can eat restaurant, place 1 order, feed your whole family, then complaint to the owner that it’s unfair?

    • Anonymous

      That’s not a fair analogy. Most people who tether are using the data themselves, not sharing it with others.

      • Homer_J_S

        Not intended to be a perfect analogy. Bottom line: Nudnicks shouldn’t be arguing that “I paid for unlimited data, it’s illegal for them to limit me.” Wrong. Some here are acting like they’re being denied a “right” to something that was never part of their contract in the first place.

  • I hate how these carriers cant just accept the fact that they are dumb-pipes. Plain and simple. Get over it, and start working on being the best dumb-pipe out there.

    • Jak_341

      That can’t and won’t accept it. That is where they are headed though. They want to be content providers at cost. They will fight tooth and nail to protect their revenue streams. As much as the RIAA is attempting to protect the brick and mortar CD industry.

  • Anonymous

    Guess I am confused. By blocked do you mean the app wont work or you just can’t find the app itself?

  • Mth2134

    I found it. On my sdcard. 🙂 Don’t use it tho.

    • kcrang

      i’ve used it this month and i checked the bill but i’m not billed for hotspot fee yet

  • Total BS. I know they want to “protect their network” but I’m paying for the service, I own the device. If this is what users want then Verizon should do what they must to handle the extra load and if that increases data package prices then so be it, just get the ‘lock it down’ mentality out of your head because it will not work – users who really want to tether for free will do it no matter what and it makes Verizon look like jerks – lose lose.

  • kcrang

    wifi tether website is still alive. you can just download .apk files there

  • Afgggkakwoy

    Just go to the dev’s google code page:

    http://code.google.com/p/android-wifi-tether/

  • Alberto

    Couldn’t find wireless tether however barnacle tether did show up – Thunderbolt stock

  • b3n

    This is just plain stupid some of us use wireless tether to do their job. This gets us a little thing called a paycheck. Which is then used to pay my fracking vzw bill.

  • Collin

    OG Droid: Was on my list of apps. However, when I tried to press on it, it gave me an error and told me it wasn’t found, then removed it from the list. It’s still installed though.

  • Anonymous

    yea i agree. if you pay for date no matter how much data, unlimited or capped, then you should be able to use that data anyway you’d like. to block something thats attached to data and then charge for it is like stealing. or a really good con job. but there isnt enough people doing something about it cuz they are too busy trying to make points using cable tv as an analogy. thank god for root and barnicle tether.

  • Br_hermon

    Two questions here: 1. will this be blocked on non activated phones (like my old android phone I still have laying around and use for different stuff) (yes I know, how could you tether from a phone without service, but I’m talking bigger picture here: Carriers blocking a variety of apps, not just tethering apps)
    2. Was this ever available on Amazon? (I don’t see it listed now) Could Amazon prove to be a work-around?

  • Anonymous

    Consider this scenario: I download ‘stuff’ to my Android phone. Doesn’t matter what the stuff is, music, images, PDF’s, whatever. No problem from the carrier’s point of view, and no extra service fees or plans or required. I decide to transfer this ‘stuff’ to another device (laptop, tablet, whatever), by any convenient means (microSD card, USB, Dropbox, whatever). Still, the carrier has no beef with me.

    Tethering is no different in the ultimate result, except it eliminates the middle step of having to manually transfer ‘stuff’ from my Android device to the target. Unlike others who might share their connection with multiple devices, or gobble up tons of bandwidth, when I tether, I working with emailm checking Facebook, paying some bills, maybe watching a couple YouTube videos. I’m doing basically the same thing I’d be doing on my Android phone, just with a bigger screen, a full keyboard, and a mouse. I doubt there is any noticeable change in my data consumption.

    I refuse to pay additional monthly fees to eliminate that manual transfer, or, accomplish the equivalent of attaching a big screen, keyboard, and mouse to my device.

    • Except… You signed a contract to get the data on your phone. They asked you if you wanted to spend more money for the convenience of downloading it through their network to your computer, and you refused to cough up the dough. Now, they’re preventing you from stealing it anyway. If you don’t want to pay to eliminate the transfer, then don’t, and both sides are happy.

      • Anonymous

        Violating terms & conditions, perhaps, but I am not stealing. In fact, I’m using my phone in a way it was designed to used to be used. The extra fcharge doesn’t make anything on my phone work that wouldn’t have worked under circumstances – it’s simply a money grab by the carriers. I’m also not using any more (or less) data than I would normally consume, so even in terms of taking bytes that don’t belong to me, I’m still not stealing.

  • Neither tethering apps are working for me. could be rom but i doubt it running OG droid with Bugless 6.2.1

  • We can still side-load it (those of us on Verizon), but nice try!

  • Hello! I could find Wireless tether on both my devices (LG O2x and Samsung i5500), and I’m using them with TIM and Vodafone (Italian companies). Just wanted to let you know as you asked, but it’s true that Italy is always behind 😀

  • Cwzrd23

    Just use barnicle wifi tether lite it still in the market if your on Verizon Droid x I still have Wireless tether on my Droid x and I can’t find it in the market

  • Anonymous

    As far as I am concerned, if blocking tethering is the first step to unlocking bootloaders, block the crap out of that APK.

    If it’s not, then screw you, Verizon.

  • DX, shows Barnacle, VZW

    • Travisjshepherd

      same here on og

  • Wireless Tether is not working on my phone anymore.

    • nobody

      Same here on Verizon 3G. I think they’ve finally axed it.

  • Porno

    the wireless tether apk is easily found by a simple google search.

  • Someone needs to put this up as an APK download away from the market so carriers can’t screw with it. As a developer if they take away my ability to sideload apps I’m dumping smart phones all together.

    • NetworkPIMP

      It’s been that way for a very long while… you should google search for it.. the 1st link is it 😉 http://goo.gl/5QFN

  • guest

    Found when searching from my Xoom (not rooted – just did a search). Did not find it with my OG Droid. But i already have that rooted and running it – used it just last night while sitting waiting for new tires. Tethered my new MacBook Pro to OG Droid no issues, 🙂

  • YourMomsLooseTwaht

    Good, thieves did this and ruined root for everyone.

    • tethering is hardly an issue, it’s actually quite surprising they waste so much energy on preventing it.

      as is, supposedly less than 1% of users are rooted (which is required to tether). and Im pretty sure less than 20% of those rooted users even use tethering to even significantly change any pattern on their typical smartphone use. so we have what? like 5% of those 1% rooted users actually using more than 5GBs/mo (which shudnnt really be considered a lot)… andd what % of THAT do you think will actually pay for tethering if it got cut off?

      I have tethering enabled on my Droid.. but seriously.. there have been months when I havent even turned it on. Then on one random day id be out and in emergency need of it and I’d eat up a few hundred MBs. My actual smartphone data usage fluctuates between 1GB & 3GB month to month..

      ironically, for those sporadic tethering I do, if I had actually attempted to operate off my phone, i probably wouldve eaten up a lot more data having to go thru more websites, not only DLing, but also ULing files to my dropbox, not to mention constantly clicking the wrong links loading useless pages. I work faster on an actual PCtop it’s all done within half hr. If I had to do it all on my phone, that would take hrs, which also means I would have to constantly navigate in and out of webbrowsing between task to eventually get it all done… again, reloading the same pages Iv already looked at everytime i return to web browsing.

      they’re wasting their time, wasting their money, and pissing off their consumers for trying to block free tethering, something that will be a thing of the very near future anyway

  • Mr Josh Zombie

    Can’t find it on my Xoom, Thunderbolt, or OG Droid. It no longer shows as installed either under the market however it does still work just fine.

    Time for the devs to jump to the Amazon app store?

  • JOK

    Stealing data?
    These wireless service providers really need to watch it.
    Under contract my smartphone has “unlimited” data for $29.99
    Service providers who feel they need to charge extra for tethering only prove that the only thing they care about is making money. Does $20 extra a month seem fair for 1GB of data? Didn’t think so.
    Unlimited means “Unlimited”
    Take me to court, I will counter-sue & win.

    Stop being Greeeeeeeedy

    • YourMomsLooseTwaht

      No, you won’t read your contract-the whole thing moron.

    • Jak_341

      You won’t win. In fact, you will get the suit tossed out of court before hand. You signed a contract that explicitly details that tethering requires a tethering plan. If you tether without, you are in breach of contract and could conceivably have your contract terminated and penalties imposed.

      And wireless carriers are ‘for profit’ companies. So yes, they can do what they want. It is your right, as a consumer, to find a carrier that fits your needs.

      • NetworkPIMP

        You’re 100% correct – to be clear, I don’t like it – but you are correct… ppl need to STFU already and read what they’re signing 1st – did no one watch South Park this week…

        I get it, it’s unfair, it’s bullshit – unlimited should mean that… blah blah blah… all I’m saying is that carriers are within their rights, even tho we don’t want it to be this way. Welcome to the new economy. It sux ass.

        • Jak_341

          Again, to be clear, I don’t like it either. Unfortunately, I need tethering for my Xoom (at least until 4G service hits 🙂 )

          Do people not remember 5 years ago? GPS was $9.99 with VZW if you wanted it. Streaming video and music was prohibited by your contract. If you wanted that, $9.99 for VCast. If you wanted work mail (even POP based), you had to sign up for the cooperate email and web package. Trust me, things were a lot worse years ago. Now everyone is complaining about an extra $20.00 to tether.

        • contracts may be contracts, but there have been many times that if a contract is unreasonable and abusive, the courts can step in & set it straight.

          If most of you pay attention to the most of the “contracts” u sign… ALLL of them say something along the lines that if using their product/service you will not hold them responsible for damages. Obviously, companies have been held responsible many times against their own contracts. Contracts are usually created to only protect the entity that created it. Contracts do not get approved by the courts for legality before it can be signed. From the consumer end especially, u really dont have an option to say no even if it’s unfair.

          Ever read employment contracts when you first started working in your retail shops or w/e entry level position?
          “This is an at will employment and the company reserves the right to terminate your employment at it’s sole discretion without prior notice.”
          this line is OBVIOUSLY actually illegal because it violates Labor Laws depending on the reason for termination yet it’s everywhere. It’s just there as a first line of defense and deterrence to anyone who might think of questioning their actions.. it holds very little weight.

        • EC8CH

          So VZW is within their rights to sew my lips to the butthole of an asian man if they put it into their VOS and I sign it? Because that makes about as much sense as charging $20/month for 1GB of tethered data.

  • Sandman

    This can’t be happening! Are they just blocking it from the market or can they block you from using it if you already have it?

  • Sandman

    This can’t be happening! Are they just blocking it from the market or can they block you from using it if you already have it?

  • But actually, just yesterday I installed Wireless Tether on my OG droid. Lemme go check it now. 🙂

  • But actually, just yesterday I installed Wireless Tether on my OG droid. Lemme go check it now. 🙂

  • Jeff

    One more reason to give up on Android and go to iPhone…..

    It wont be long before the Carriers lock down Android as bad as the iPhone is locked down. If you have to have a locked down phone you might as well get the one that supports applications like Netflix….

    • BloodiedWraith

      The old me would’ve commented saying you’re stupid for doing that, but I can’t say that anymore. My Motorola Droid was starting to fall apart so I had to upgrade. I weighed my options heavily, but I ended up going the route of the iPhone 4. Why? Well, since all manufacturers and carriers are locking Android down with locked bootloaders, massive amounts of bloatware, etc. I might as well go with a locked down phone that has no bloatware out of the box, no carrier interference, and has Netflix. Not to mention once it’s jailbroken it handles everything I need right now. I still have my Motorola Xoom so I have the best of both worlds right now, but until carriers and manufacturers realize they’re destroying Android, I’ll have to stick with my iPhone 4 (sadly).

      • Apple TROLL!

        Don’t you think that Apple will prevent jailbreaking one day, just like Motorola has done with rooting?

        You sir are Kyle in the HUMANCENTiPAD.

        • KraYzeE

          Motorola has prevented rooting? 🙂

        • Actually apple already tried to stop jailbreaking but lost in court

        • BloodiedWraith

          I do hope your comment wasn’t directed at me because I am far from a troll. Don’t be blinded by your obsession with a phone to realize that what carriers and manufacturers are doing is hurting Android for the people like you (I’m guessing since you come here) and I who like to do what they want to their devices.

          Also, as someone pointed out to you already, Motorola has not blocked rooting. They just encrypted their bootloaders to prevent custom kernels and a majority of custom ROMs. Apple can block jailbreak and it’d still be okay because the other thing that they do is have no bloatware on their devices, which is a main reason why most people root their Android devices.

          Had there been a Nexus on VZW with unlocked bootloader and no bloatware I would have been all over that. In the future if they release a Nexus I will sell my iPhone and buy it even if I have to pay full retail. But right now with the way VZW has been acting, I don’t foresee that happening.

  • DroidHAM

    How is tethering any different from using Pandora or something? Data is data, the only difference is they have a extra plan for tethering and are greedy…

    • Anonymous

      Apparently, using Pandora on my X to stream 5 gigs of music a month is fine and dandy. Instead, using my X as a tether to stream 5 gigs of Pandora a month to my Ipad instead of my X is causing undue stress on their network.

      Cell providers’ flawless logic, ftw! O.o

  • I was able to load it initially after upgrading to Gingerbread on the DX, but it doesn’t work. I can understand why the carriers are doing this, but at the same time, we’re paying them for an internet connection. We don’t get charged for hooking up extra PC’s to our home networks, why should wireless be an exception. I know a while back home ISP’s were charging if it was a home network setup but I haven’t seen that in a long time. They also used to charge by the hour like the good old AOL days. I’m hoping wireless internet can go through the same paces and open up more over time like traditional land-line internet has. We’ve gone from per MB, to per device, now we just need it to be per contract.

  • Noo! How will I play Xbox?!?

  • Greg

    as long as there’s a .apk for it.. who cares

    • Anonymous

      yup

    • Unless you are on AT&T who prevents side loading of .apk’s.

      • EC8CH

        If you are on AT&T all hope is lost anyways 😛

      • Ever hear of Side Load Wonder Machine? Created for those poor folks on the AT&T “Notwork”.

    • Leykamp

      Well then you use the power of your dollar and take your business to Verizon. People need to be more aware that all these companies work for US, the consumer, and if enough people say, “I think this sucks you may no longer have my money” THEN and only then will things change for the better for consumers as a whole. NOW CUE UP THE STAR SPANGLED BANNER!

  • Anonymous

    Well I guess I can return my wifi only xoom 🙁 sigh….

  • KraYzeE

    How is it stealing data when you pay for unlimited? Carriers are wrong here, not the users. you should be able to use YOUR data however you choose, since YOU pay for unlimited.

    • Anonymous

      Which is why I put that in quotes, because I’m on your side here.

      • I honestly don’t see how it’s legal for the carriers to prevent us from tethering our “unlimited” data plans from our phones. I’d love to find out who (FCC, DOJ, or whoever) has the authority to tell the carriers they can’t do this and get them to do so.

        • Tether_Police

          It’s “legal” because you signed a contract that says you can’t tether. Verizon: Here’s a phone with unlimited data. No tethering allowed. You: Okay. Where do I sign? You agreed not to tether when you signed the dotted line. What is illegal about Verizon holding you to that? If you want to tether other devices, Verizon has a paid option for that: Verizon Wireless 3G Mobile Hotspot. No one is stopping you from tethering. You just happen to not like the terms of the contract you signed and the other available options for making tethering possible.

          • the problem is that there is absolutely no reason to charge extra for tethering (one device mind you) as you’re rarely using both your phone and the tethered device at the same time. So you’re still only using one device with your data plan.

            Adding insult to injury, capped data plans are even more reason to not have a tethering plan. You already pay an extra ~$10 for each extra 1GB you consume. If you consume data faster because you’re tethering, that’s more money for the carrier. A potential $10 overage is much easier to swallow and less likely to deter people to pay up than an extra $20-$30 senselessly added to your data plan.

          • Except that the amount of data you’ll use on a laptop is far, far more than you’d be using with phone apps.

          • And you pay for all that data now. AT&T, anything over 2GB. Verizon is currently unlimited but has stated repeatedly it will be capped shortly. T-Mobile new plans are throttled after 2GB and 5GB on older contracts.

          • the problem is that there is absolutely no reason to charge extra for tethering (one device mind you) as you’re rarely using both your phone and the tethered device at the same time. So you’re still only using one device with your data plan.

            Adding insult to injury, capped data plans are even more reason to not have a tethering plan. You already pay an extra ~$10 for each extra 1GB you consume. If you consume data faster because you’re tethering, that’s more money for the carrier. A potential $10 overage is much easier to swallow and less likely to deter people to pay up than an extra $20-$30 senselessly added to your data plan.

          • @pple Corp

            You signed the terms, now verizon can link you, your data, and three other people mouth to ass together to make the human centiPad lol

          • Jason w.s.

            It just boggles my mind how people just can’t seem to understand this. Believe me, I want to be allowed to tether all my devices whenever, and on whatever I want too. But, there’s laws, rules, and contracts that we sign and are supposed to abide by, and that’s just life. It is what it is. Sucks but it’s true. Then people say “Well that’s not fair! It’s just the big companies being greedy, and wanting more money out of us!” And you know what? That’s true. It IS that way and it’s always been that way and it always will be that way. This situation is kinda like if you paid for unlimited car washes for your vehicle. You can take your car for a wash everyday if you like, even a couple times a day, because you paid for UNLIMITED washes for your car…But then you decide to bring your wife’s car, and your pick up truck, and your sons car, and your moms, your sisters, and your grandmas vehicles all in for one of your FREE UNLIMITED car washes that YOU paid for, and the car wash place laughs in your face and tells you ya gotta pay for every other vehicle you want washed. Its weird but this all makes perfectly good sense to me, and I really dont understand why other people don’t get it.

          • JP

            Actually a better analogy would be like in the 80’s when cable first came out. The cable companies didn’t want customers using a splitter to have cable on multiple televisions in your house even though you were paying for the service. Now a days they don’t care how many televisions you plug into.

          • Iconoclast

            Horrible analogy because splitting the signal in your own home does not effect the over all whole bandwidth through out the neighborhood.

          • Actually it is a perfect analogy. As previously stated, a phone utilizing the maximum level its carrier bandwidth allows on its own is not creating anymore of a demand than if it were acting as a wireless router to several computers. If the maximum download speed your phone can do is 4-7 mbps down, then it will not be able to suddenly draw even more if it is used to share internet. This anti-tether argument is yet another case of the networks not wanting us to get the most use out of the products we pay for. Such has been the case since phones capable of the service first emerged on the market.

          • trblinparadiz

            Actually, the cable companies do care how many devices you hook up, because it degrades the power of your signal and if you hook up too much you can diminish your entire neighborhood of signal strength. I have 4 TVs and a wireless router hooked up in my house which I paid for ALL of them. I was getting horrible HD signals on my main TV, so I called and had a technician come out to my house, he said I had too many devices hooked up. I explained how I pay for all these devices, he said Comcast wants me to either take some devices off-line, or they won’t be able to fix my problem, and explained the power issue. He said some neighbors of mine newly signed up and have reduced the line signal in my area. I told him, NOT MY PROBLEM, I am paying for this, so make it work… I had to call and work my way up the ladder until I got a manager who said he would have the signal strength on the line increased, and in 2 days my TV looked great again… I also got a credit for 2 weeks of bad signal.
            Now I still HATE Comcast and can’t wait to get another service in my area that I can reasonable switch to, but landline and Cellular networks are the SAME D*MN thing when it comes to signal strength and users. This is all a money plow by the carriers. They offer unlimited plans to be competitive and get people on their networks and then CHANGE THEN PLAN once your on the network, saying that they told you so from the start… It’s all BUSINESS, I don’t like it, but without the increased revenue from doing stupid stuff like this, they wouldn’t be able to build all these nice new towers to provide this signal in the first place. So unless you want ALL of your bills with the cell phone company going up to cover the cost, be happy that they charge a premium for tethering…

          • Anonymous

            Thats a dumb ass analogy. Im not tethering my wifes, uncles, the guy down the street, the chick at mcdonalds that i bought my big mac from yesterday. I’m tethering MY laptop maybe once a month. You know what? I love simptons like you who can’t see thetruck about to run you down. Tethering devices is no different than running a wireless router in your home for all of your computers to run on. Wait until internet providers start charging you 45 bucks a month for your wifes, sisters, uncles, kids laptops and ps3’s that you connect through your wireless network. Sounds really unreasonable now doesn’t it?

          • Anonymous

            Except that it is different from running a wireless router for all your computers to run on, in that case, you’re using landline internet service, with tethering, you’re using cell towers which are far more limited and far more susceptible to slowdowns. The reason they started to crack down on tethering is because people abused it, because some idiots would download dozens on gigs worth of torrents while tethered which wreak havoc on wireless data (hell it wreaks havoc on landlines too)… And that exact mindset (IE: its my data, I can do what I want with it) is why some networks are crappier than others, if they allowed tethering like you all want, and everyone started using their 3G/4G connection to download torrents 24/7, the network would be incredibly congested and barely usable, and then you’d probably be the first to complain about it, yet, it’s this kind of abuse which would have brought it to that point.

          • Anon

            The reason they are so susceptible to slow downs are because the “BIG 2 – at&t and verizon” wont invest enough in thier wireless technology to stay ahead of demand. I get 4-7meg down on my “fake” 4g on TMo but my friend maxes out at under 2 meg on at&t 4g… explain that to me

          • Anonymous

            It’s quite simple actually:

            T-Mobile = ~33 Million users
            AT&T = ~97.5 Million users

            And no, that’s not the only reason, wireless data (IE:3G/4G) is far more limited than residential internet, cell towers can only accommodate so many users using so much bandwidth before the quality of service suffers, which is why AT&T’s network has been utter garbage since the iPhone’s release… So with people using their wireless data to download torrents, movies, streaming music and the like, it takes a toll on the network as a whole… Keeping people from tethering lowers the chances of them downloading stuff like that over 3G/4G where the network cannot handle it as well as residential connections can… Torrents alone can cripple even the fastest residential internet connection, now imagine what it does to 3G/4G connections.

          • Mistafreeze

            Torrents don’t cripple anything anymore than streaming an HD movie would. Spoken with true ignorance.

          • Yogo

            Torrents are more likely to cripple a internet connection. THAT IS A FACT!

            Why? What makes torrents special is the way in which they are downloaded. Instead of downloading a full file from one source, a torrent simultaneously downloads portions of that file from multiple users. Downloading a single torrent requires your computer to connect to several different computers.

            If you’ve used a torrent client before, you’ll have noticed that your download speed greatly increases with the number of “seeds” (complete torrent files) that are available. The fewer seeds, the longer it takes to download. Your download speed increases with the more file sources your computer connects to. This is good for your torrents, but bad for your overall Internet speed.

            Also if your a good little torrent user you are also uploading what you have download to other users.

          • They shouldn’t have offered something they couldn’t deliver on.  They must hold up their part of the bargain!!!

          • Obblack

            Except all devices have a bandwidth limit. No matter how much I download simultaneously via my phone my download rate is is capped by the 3G/4G limit. Tethering multiple devices would not give my phone any more bandwidth than it already has. Therefore, tethering multiple devices to one phone and have them all downloading would be no differant than running simultaneous apps and having each app download. Id be capped to the same maximum download rate. Therefore, tethering is invisible as far as data in concerned. The only way the providers know you’re doing it is they can sniff the IP address assigned to your tethered device given by your phone seeing as your phone, when acting as a tether, is also acting as a router with dhcp server.

            Or… more simply… data transfer rates are bound to bandwidth of the gateway device not the number of devices using the gateway. A gateway with 100 devices has same bandwidth as a gateway with only itself.

          • Acmeabode

            Absolutely correct and makes a mockery of all previous BS data overload arguements. We are not connecting several devices to the towers. Our devices we paid for, our children paid for have capability to connect. We pay for a connection that has inherent limitation. What is the problem? Why keep us in the dark here, US. ?

          • TM

            it is, plain and simply, NOT POSSIBLE to abuse an unlimited data fee. that is like staying in an all-you-can-eat buffet and with waiters complaining that you really eat a lot. if you offer an unlimited plan, you have to deal with people actually taking you by your word.

          • Roach

            Except you agreed to certain rules when you signed your contract for that “unlimited” plan. Just like you can’t bring grocery bags with you and fill them up to take home at a buffet, you’re restricted with what you can do with your data plan.

          • TM

            that’s kind of a nice analogy in my eyes. but it actually proves my point 🙂 how I see it …

            you don’t pay for “per DEVICE” data, you per for “per PERSON” data. like at the buffet. and like at the buffet the data (“food”) has to be consumed right away, which it – simply by downloading, aka “using” or “eating” – is. at the end you pay for bandwith and volume, and have no restrictions in place or time (which would be ridiculous with a mobile device) like at the buffet.

            and yes, if you agreed NOT to use another computer, that sucks, and you probably have to abide by it. I mainly meant to comment the comment of m1ndtr1p, who said using the network to download torrents would be “abuse”.

          • Okay, so here’s a thought. I’m pretty sure that all of us (the “small few” that the big companies won’t respond to) could come up with plenty of crap to download in a single day to put the same “strain” on the network that we might if downloading stuff using our tethered computers. So the thought occurs to me… why aren’t we organizing “bandwidth hog” rallies in cities across the U.S. to put as much strain on these providers’ networks/towers as humanly possible, just using our phones. Would it be possible to get our voices heard – let VZW know that we’re not THAT small of a crowd that hate their BS limitation – by pulling down networks in certain areas. I mean, even if just for a few ours some evening.. a few thousand people in a large city just start downloading the crap out of torrents to our phones just to hog the bandwidth and get their attention? I’m not saying it would get them to change their tethering policy, but it sure would be nice to let them know how much we hate them for it. Maybe we write them a letter and let them know that once every two weeks, we will organize a “network crashing” party until they decide to stop the bullshit block or tracker or whatever that they’ve put into GB. I mean, hey, if they wanna pull BS on their end of the contract, let’s pull some BS on our end. (sorry if this seems a bit psychotic or completely unfeasible.. I’m really tired.. but it’d still be cool)

          • Ansel

            You definitely did agree to only one device.

          • Jackson2007

            Taking grocery bags with you of food out of the restaurant is not the same at all. You are not getting more data by tethering. A better analogy would be the restaurant has said you can only eat using chopsticks but you find that you eat better using a fork, so that is what you try to use. Still the same amount of food (data) eaten up, only done in a more efficient way.

          • roger muldavin

            Add that chops sticks (cs) combined with eating directly from the bowl to mouth (btm), I have found works better than a fork, one advantage being I get the full fluid and solids, … slirp, slirp, good vegies, soy, rice, and more….

            Long live cs-btm and best to healthy Chinese Eating, rm

          • chikenhawk

            but you have the agreement that you have access to an unlimited amount of data within a month period. its the same as being able to eat as much as you can AT the buffet. should you be charged more if you eat more than 2 plates of food simply because that is the average amount they “expected” per person?

          • Sorry… but DATA IS DATA.  No merrit to your point.  The same packets are used on the phone and the packets are used only once in a “ICS” or Internet Sharing Service.  BIG LAW SUIT IF THEY TRIED TO CLAIM THIS!!!!

          • Mike65

            The unlimited data is for the device you have been licensed to have unlimited service with… Why is it hard to understand? We can’t even drive on our public roads for free! We pay taxes so the roads can be maintained. Nothing is free! It sounds like you guys are Amish or something. Go grow some vegetables or something.

          • O0RaidR0o

            I would agree accept for one thing, it will be ok to allegedly cripple a network as long as I pay the extra fee. How is paying an extra fee for data that you’re already paying for going to protect against the bandwidth hogs. But you probably didn’t think about that did you?

          • YEp…

            Obviously you have never heard of a cradlepoint router with usb support for air cards… You probably didn’t think about that did you? Oh no of course not because you are stupid… Next time you want to be an ass about something make sure you know what the hell you are talking about….

          • Listen to what you said… “They Abuse celltowers…”  They abuse Land Lines too…  Thus, there is NO DIFFERENCE HERE!!!

          • Guest

            I just thought I’d let you know that downloading torrents and playing data-intensive games, etc, is all just as possible from your phone as it is your computer, assuming you have a high end phone. You can easily use just as much data whether you’re working through a tethered system or directly from your phone. And no everyone uses it for those reasons. Most people I know just like to be able to hop on their laptop and use the net while they are away from home, and I see absolutely no harm in that. Your argument is invalid.

          • Ericklamb

            if that were really the case internet companies would simply cap your data usage. but that’s not even what it’s about. it’s about the phone companies realizing they shot themselves in the foot and now want to back track because they realize that this would be a good opportunity to capitalize.  

          • Acmeabode

            Yes I understand your point, but this is no different than giving the entire class detention for a single jerkoff. Similar to the so-called “patriot-act” mentality. It is plainly and simply denying and keeping for profit for themselves (Corps.) technology that the people ought to reap. If there are abuses these should be singled out and dealt with. “Unlimited” plans are actually capped are they not. Certain abuses and not protecting against such should be dealt with on individual basis, Not by throwing out the lot.

          • Mike

            We do buy a license to connect via the carrier’s network. There are terms and conditions… The companies have guide lines and business models so they can make a profit and still spend money for research and development. You guys are morons if you can’t figure out piracy. If you think you can provide a “all you can eat” service to everyone you have no business sense and just stupid! Have you ever purchased an all you can eat option at a restaurant and went back the next day and ate more since you did buy it the day before. Did you ever order all you can eat and let your family use the same plate and shared with the next to you. If you did.. you’re a thief!

          • ShortylovesPhil

            My internet company try’s to do that now!

          • One of the principles of contract law, though, is that both sides should have the power to negotiate and if one side is always unreasonably dictating unfair terms, the other side can contest it or have it deemed void.

            The hew and cry about tethering might be subject to class action etc. so it will be interesting.

          • jon

            I totally agree and would like to see some class action taken agains ALL of the major telco (and now-getting-into-the-act cable-co’s); currently, our only options when signing these agreements are A) sign the agreement as per the telco’s greedy provisions, or B) refuse the agreement, and have no wireless data service. Many of us actually need data services for work – unreimbursed work expenses which (many) employers expect their employees to bear. And yes, with the job market being what it is, many of us can’t rightly refuse. Since I’m paying for a certain amount of data ‘access’ per cycle – why should I not have the option to use it however the hell I want to – at no additional (extortionate) charge? This is exactly like the cable-splitter and ‘additional tv’ charge which cable companies used to levy on people; because most consumers didn’t understand that this was a redundant charge for a non-existent ‘service’ or ‘option.’ This IS the kind of situation where consumers should be able to depend upon governmental consumer protections. But, unfortunately, due to the fact that 99.99% of elected representatives are concerned more with multi-million dollar lobbies, we will have to go the route of courts and wrist-slap punitive damages.

          • Mike65

            Voodo law…That’s funny! If you loot an industry of there products they will disappear because we will bankrupt them. We will destroy capitalism by thinking we can use the law to find loop holes so we can get something for nothing. If you are anti growth than keep thinking this way. We need to allow these companies to make a profit. Are you all going to pay all the taxes and provide all the innovation it will take to make America great again? Not with that kind of thinking! Sounds like you are book smart but really naive.

          • Flarros

            Lol. Do you have any idea what the profit margin is on these companies? (Look up the cost of delivering internet. It is about a penny a gig on the FASTEST NEWEST network in the world -Even if everyone on that network were to simultaneously stream 3 HD netflix movies all at once, thereby reducing the max number of possible occupants on the system, that still is only about 8 cents a gig AT MOST)

            In addition, net neutrality doesnt exist on these wireless versions of the internet thanks to these very companies. They also cut staff that maintain fiber and copper wires allowing in the ground wire to deteriorate. Why? To move everyone over to their new networks with faster speeds, data caps, and whatever version of the internet they feel they want you to see. Cheers. These companies are really, no I mean REALLY, bad. Do a little research on the subject matter. 😛

          • Flarros

            Lol. Do you have any idea what the profit margin is on these companies? (Look up the cost of delivering internet. It is about a penny a gig on the FASTEST NEWEST network in the world -Even if everyone on that network were to simultaneously stream 3 HD netflix movies all at once, thereby reducing the max number of possible occupants on the system, that still is only about 8 cents a gig AT MOST)

            In addition, net neutrality doesnt exist on these wireless versions of the internet thanks to these very companies. They also cut staff that maintain fiber and copper wires allowing in the ground wire to deteriorate. Why? To move everyone over to their new networks with faster speeds, data caps, and whatever version of the internet they feel they want you to see. Cheers. These companies are really, no I mean REALLY, bad. Do a little research on the subject matter. 😛

          • Kodosai

            Yes, that’s the power of contracts. Both sides have the ability to negotiate and agree OR disagree to the terms proposed by the other party. For example, you could choose not to sign a contract that contains terms you do not agree with. You may wish to change that contract before signing, and at that point, the other party can either agree OR disagree with any changes you might request. That is both the spirit and letter of the law. Now just because a company might choose to make policy that they will not agree with any terms other than their own. See there, both parties have the power and must come to an agreement (depicted by signature or other accepted methods of legally binding the agreement) based on the terms therein.

            Yes, there could be a class action regarding the entire thing, but that doesn’t necessarily make it the right course of action. Generally speaking, if the carrier is not breaking the law in putting in a provision restricting your ability to tether, then they have the right to do so since you signed an agreement attesting to that. Keep in mind from a business standpoint, they have to have some method for determining what kind of availability they need in a given area based on the number of devices that have been purchased that will utilize X infrastructure. There’s no reliable way to do that if X number of other devices that they have no way of accounting for are suddenly utilizing it. Their ability to profit is largely dependent on providing “just enough” coverage in a given area to support the devices it is aware of with a cushionable comfort zone without over-providing coverage for no reason.

            If they were trying to do something based on you downloading with your smartphone 24/7/365 over their 3g connection and you have a truly unlimited data plan per contract, then that is grounds for a lawsuit as they would be in breach of contract at that point. It’s honestly pretty stupid to sue someone for enforcing the terms of a contract you both agreed to…

          • Kodosai

            Yes, that’s the power of contracts. Both sides have the ability to negotiate and agree OR disagree to the terms proposed by the other party. For example, you could choose not to sign a contract that contains terms you do not agree with. You may wish to change that contract before signing, and at that point, the other party can either agree OR disagree with any changes you might request. That is both the spirit and letter of the law. Now just because a company might choose to make policy that they will not agree with any terms other than their own. See there, both parties have the power and must come to an agreement (depicted by signature or other accepted methods of legally binding the agreement) based on the terms therein.

            Yes, there could be a class action regarding the entire thing, but that doesn’t necessarily make it the right course of action. Generally speaking, if the carrier is not breaking the law in putting in a provision restricting your ability to tether, then they have the right to do so since you signed an agreement attesting to that. Keep in mind from a business standpoint, they have to have some method for determining what kind of availability they need in a given area based on the number of devices that have been purchased that will utilize X infrastructure. There’s no reliable way to do that if X number of other devices that they have no way of accounting for are suddenly utilizing it. Their ability to profit is largely dependent on providing “just enough” coverage in a given area to support the devices it is aware of with a cushionable comfort zone without over-providing coverage for no reason.

            If they were trying to do something based on you downloading with your smartphone 24/7/365 over their 3g connection and you have a truly unlimited data plan per contract, then that is grounds for a lawsuit as they would be in breach of contract at that point. It’s honestly pretty stupid to sue someone for enforcing the terms of a contract you both agreed to…

          • Anon

            I dont know about anyone else but I’m sick and tired of that “it is what it is” crap.
            AT&T managers use it so much to get from answering questions I’m surprized someone hasn’t gone postal on them yet.

          • no

            No, your analogy is flawed! It is like payig for unlimited water usage from the water company, and you can water your lawn all day every day if you want Then you start hooking your water lines to your neighbors houses. That’s what it’s like. Question is, if you are paying for unlimited water, who says you cant give that water to whoever/whatever you want to give it to. So if your paying for an unlimited internet data connection, why cant you tether?

          • Cornfry182

            See my response above to “Tether Police”

          • roof rack

            Bad analogy. This is like wanting to wash your bike so strapping it to the back of your car and driving through the car wash or putting a rack of dishes on top of the car so you don’t have to run the dishwasher at home. Or maybe putting your four wheeler in the back of your pickup and driving through the car wash.

            It’s money grab by the carriers, plain and simple.

          • John

            Hum, the car wash analogy was actually a pretty good one. I didn’t look at it like that till you posted.

          • The Internet Data still goes through and is used by the initial device the phone… TOTALLY DIFFERENT!!!  The Data from It’s Source is only piped once.  The Device (the Phone) is sharing it’s internet.  It’s like me allowing you to make a phone call on my phone I pay the services for.

          • ThatDave

            I think the important thing here is that “tethering” when I signed my contract was not defined as WiFi hotspot sharing… NOT IS IT THE SAME.

            One is using a physical connection to use the phone “as a modem” to connect to the internet with an external device.  Over the last few years, the wireless company’s have been able to redefine the term to include any form of ICS or internet connection sharing.  What if you are using it to VPN?  And it is not using the internet… then.. well, you are still screwed as they are making the newer contract out to pay more and more for things which you already paid for.

            Go go capitalism really.  I work for a company which operates and installs on hundreds of cell towers.  Outside of a few cities, there is no scare resource as they define it.  Costs to provide 500GB of data range from $1-$5/mo.. they pass that on to 100 users at $50 per month each, yes 20,000% markup.  But that is not nearly enough.  You then need to add an additional 80% (or $40 fee) on top of it.

            Don’t confuse this.  It has nothing to do with carriers being “taken advantage of” or “enforcing their contracts.”  It plain and simple is a means to prevent the reduction in multiple streams of payment.  My G2 hits 3-6Mbps rather frequently, which is 1 – 2TB/mo on potential transfer.  Instead we get throttled after 5GB.  Its all about preventing people from doing away with all other internet connections and consolidating the cost.  A single 2Mbps burstable connection (if it sustained that), is enough for a household of 5 people.

            tldr; its not about right, its about “right for business,” consumers have no true other option, telco’s attack aggressively even townships which provide their own broadband.

          • Ericklamb

            I believe tethering is more like putting your grandma’s rascal in the back of your truck and taking it through the carwash. ultimately all of the data is going through my phone I am not connecting my laptop to a 3g network by itself. it’s more like buying a portable dvd player and the company saying ok but just don’t attach it to your 50″ plasma and actually have a enjoyable viewing experience because you’re only allowed to watch your dvd’s on the piece of junk 10″ display we charged you up the A## and put you in a 2 year time locked cell for.

          • Anonymous

            Hey tether police, shut the [email protected] up. I hate people like you who are on the wrong damn side. You act like the human population is interfering with you making billions of dollars or something, but it is ironic that you are not. Your like someone defending the ax murderer that’s about to hack up your own family. Crazy ass.

          • Tether_Police

            dmagicp: I tether. Verizon should allow it. I’m just smart enough to know I agreed not to do it when I signed my contract. Simple. I also know I might have to eventually suffer the “consequences” (service cutoff, data limit). Too many people here are so indignant about somehow being screwed by the wireless companies. I just don’t get that mentality when users know full well what they’re getting in to. Now if you want to argue that carriers should allow it and it makes zero sense they don’t, I’m on your side. In the end, not real passionate about the issue. Truth be told, I get more of a kick out of getting a rise out of people like you. Thanks for the entertainment!

          • Cpip2012

            Great answer. You Sir, are a man of of excellence and character and I saluter you……

          • Cpip2012

            Sorry, that’s “salute” you.

          • Ryan C

            When my contract was signed back in Nov 2009 when i got my OG Droid, Verizon didnt even give wireless tether a thought of being a realistic thing by using a Droid. For a long time they said it wasn’t even possible. So im sure it isn’t in my contract. It wasn’t even an option to add the feature to your contract/bill. Am i right or wrong here?

          • Yes, it is… Back in the day, Verizon called it ‘mobile broadband connect’ and it is an added feature to your contract for $30 a month for those on the “Email and Web for Smartphone” plan or $15 a month for those on the “Corporate” email and web plan.

            It’s always been there, most people just never thought of using a device for mobile internet, so they never looked twice…

          • Alien

            Actually, the Original Droid never supported tethering, therefore salesreps were unable to add the feature. There were 3rd party tethering apps in the Android Market, however.

          • What people don’t like about it is the double talk from Google on the subject. They want to please developers and fanbois on the “openness” of Android while giving in to demands of carriers including this.

            Also, I understood a “contract” to be “negotiable” by both sides. These one sided contracts are written much like the home loans and mortgages that have torpedoed this country’s economy. They are written with so much fine print and legalese that no average person could possibly understand it. Just sign on the dotted line the salesperson says.

          • SBM_from_LA

            Technically, not everyone signs the dotted line. I remember once or twice when I upgraded my cell, I did it over the phone with a service rep… I never signed any contract and the rep never went over any fineprint of TOS agreements… just told me how much it would cost and pushed a button when I said Okie Dokie.

          • Cornfry182

            The “illegal” part is the part where you’re essentially locked into this pattern or you get no service, period. You can’t go to another carrier because they ALL force you into this situation. Essentially, we have all the major carriers acting as a cartel forcing consumers down a path where you’re being charged for a service (3g data service) and then they charge again for the same service if you want to tether. You don’t get anything more for paying for this extra service other than the ability to use a feature that’s already built in and ready, but was simply disabled for marketing reasons. You don’t get faster service, you don’t get a larger cap (which means nothing on unlimited anyway) you don’t get anything other than the ability for your already built-in tethering functions to start working. This is why you’re supposed to have a reasonable amount of competition in the market, that way we would likely end up with carriers that allow tethering as a matter of course simply to make their product look more appealing than the next guy. Look no further than other international markets (like many in Europe) where this is allowed by default. Instead, the few wireless carriers we have left (in the U.S.) are most definitely working together on this matter and we, the consumers, are all screwed. Where’s the antitrust suit from the DOJ on this and other similar issues? Oh yeah I forgot, this is the same DOJ that rubber-stamped the mergers that allowed wireless carrier competition all but disappear in this country. Now they’re about to rubber-stamp T-Mobile into the hands of AT&T which will further reduce competition.

            Just because you’re forced to sign a contract with one carrier while there are zero other options in the market doesn’t make it right and justified that you are forced to pay twice for a service just so that you can use it the way you want to use it. As wireless devices become more and more of a utilitarian commodity (if it isn’t already) this sort of behavior is only going to hurt our economy, and it’s not just limited to tethering options.

            Ma Bell is back.

          • Stevo486211

            No matter what durs always wayz around their crap n as far as all them rules being on contract i signed more like they are online u dnt get it said in contract we sign..So fact is for every person trying to crack down on wifi tether users their will always be another side that are finding ways around n hackers these days come by the dozen the more they take from us the more hackers dnt give a crap about taking back!!!

      • Gregory

        It is worth it if it means that we will have unlocked bootloaders

        • Gregory

          I’d also rather have this than a data cap. We have unlimited as long as we don’t tether is better than having limited everything

          • I’d rather have a data cap, and be able to tether. I only use tethering in a pinch. Probably less than once a month. Good thing I already have the wired tether apk.

          • Anonymous

            This *IS* a data cap. It’s preventing you from using the data service you paid for in any way of your choosing.

    • Daniel Evans

      You don’t even pay for unlimited they would have an argument with unlimited but we are capped. We pay for 5GB bandwidth what difference does it make which device uses it?

      • That’s true. It just goes to show everything we pay for isn’t necessarily ours…Frustrating the FCC is ok with this….

      • Turd Furguson

        No where in my contract does it say 5GB. I have heard this 5GB cap since I had a Blackberry and have never been charged for anything over 5GB. I believe it is a Myth and nothing more. Unlimited is Unlimited!

        • Anonymous

          Only if you are on Sprint is Unlimited really Unlimited

          • angermeans

            Not true you get unlimited 3G/4G with verizon as well. No where does it say out don’t and I have never see anyone throttled. One thing sprint does do is advertise Verizon’s network on their website, but i have talked to many people that have gotten the dreaded we are letting you go mailing cause they used “too much” roamint data. That is complete BS especially when you advertise Verizon’s network rather than sprints less than average coverage area. I don’t see why more people aren’t up in arms about this as I have spoken with a dozen or so people and there average usage is only around 2gb and some aren’t even in a sprint area but was sold a sprint phone and told it would work as they are in “sprint coverage ” but really are roaming on Verizon’s. Yeah that’s real unlimited isn’t it.

          • Modplan

            From your VZW contract that you obviously did not read:

            For individual use only and not for resale. We reserve the right to protect our network from harm, which may impact legitimate data flows. We reserve the right to limit throughput or amount of data transferred, and to deny or terminate service, without notice, to anyone we believe is using an Unlimited Data Plan or Feature in any manner prohibited above or whose usage adversely impacts our network or service levels. Anyone using more than 5 GB per line in a given month is presumed to be using the service in a manner prohibited above, and we reserve the right to immediately terminate the service of any such person without notice. We also reserve the right to terminate service upon expiration of Customer Agreement term.

          • Mistafreeze

            You get this letter if more than 50% of your data use is roaming for 2 consecutive months. If thats the case, you’re on the wrong carrier anyways.

          • angermeans

            Not true you get unlimited 3G/4G with verizon as well. No where does it say out don’t and I have never see anyone throttled. One thing sprint does do is advertise Verizon’s network on their website, but i have talked to many people that have gotten the dreaded we are letting you go mailing cause they used “too much” roamint data. That is complete BS especially when you advertise Verizon’s network rather than sprints less than average coverage area. I don’t see why more people aren’t up in arms about this as I have spoken with a dozen or so people and there average usage is only around 2gb and some aren’t even in a sprint area but was sold a sprint phone and told it would work as they are in “sprint coverage ” but really are roaming on Verizon’s. Yeah that’s real unlimited isn’t it.

          • JP

            Ya if you want s**t for speed. I Just tried out the Sprint Evo for 30 days and did a speed test side by side with my buddies Verizon Thunderbolt (I have 3 towers less than a half mile form my house). He was pulling in around 20mbps download while the Evo was doing around 1mbps down. The fastest I ever got on the Evo was 6mbps and that was when I stuck it out the window on the second floor of my house. The Evo is needless to say back at the store now.

          • Enjoy your 20mbps 2 hours battery life.

      • Anonymous

        Not Sprint

      • Anonymous

        the 5GB is for mobile broadband not for smartphone data packages… but good try 🙂

    • Daniel Evans

      You don’t even pay for unlimited they would have an argument with unlimited but we are capped. We pay for 5GB bandwidth what difference does it make which device uses it?

    • Anonymous

      I agree… total bullshit… but soon enough we will just get throttled for too much usage.. I think some carriers are already doing that..

      • guesst

        GUMMO!

        • Anonymous

          best movie EVER!!!

          • jason w.s.

            “I wanna mustache damnit!” lol 😛

    • Anonymous

      I agree… total bullshit… but soon enough we will just get throttled for too much usage.. I think some carriers are already doing that..

    • Anonymous

      Then you could say its the same with cable. If i pay to have tv why cant i put a 8 way spliter and send cable to all my neighbors. If u had a service and found out people were finding loop holes and abusing the service would u not try to stop then too?

      • Turd Furguson

        How is that any different from putting your cable in more than one room in your house? or running a wireless router for the internet you PAY for? I highly doubt the wireless tether on your phone is going to go extend far enough for your 8 neighbors.

        • Anonymous

          I wouldn’t want my neighbors on my wireless for my phone anyway. Put a Wireless key on it

      • KraYzeE

        I get your point but by the same rule we shouldn’t be able to use routers? i mean i pay for Cable at our corporate office. should i only be allowed to use that for one user?

        • Anonymous

          That’s why u also pay to have it in more then one room.

          • Turd Furguson

            No, it is free for as many rooms as you want, this is not 1990 not sure who you have cable with

          • KraYzeE

            Im not talking about TV service. I have ONE cable modem for internet, through the use of a router, that data is sent to 20+ computers. So by yours and their thinking I should have my service suspended. EVEN though, the actual data being transfered is the same. It’s unlimited. They should provision their servers to handle my Cell/Cable modem. If they cant handle the data on their network, then they shouldn’t offer unlimited.

          • Anonymous

            KraYzeE – its like paying for electricity (its a service) in your house and you can only power light bulbs…..

          • Anonymous

            That’s stupid. If the terms with that electricity company were to only power one light with it then yes, you would right.

          • KraYzeE

            lol exactly

          • Anonymous

            But you are payign to have that one modem allow accuse for all those Computers. Your not paying for your phone to allow others to use its data thats the point.

          • Frosted Butts

            No, you are paying for the modem to be able to connect to the servers to send and receive data. The same is with the cell phone. I am paying for my cell phone to be able to send and receive data. Whatever i do with the data is non of their damned business. If it is my phone sending, and my phone processing the data, I am using my phone as agreed in the terms. It is irrelevant if my phone then chooses to pass on the data/requests to other connected devices.

          • I agree. As far as I am concerned my phone is a modem for their service. If I set it up as a modem/router and pass along the data to my nook, then that should not be any concern of theirs. I pay plenty of money for unlimited data, so I should receive unlimited data.

          • DaveLimited

            “Unlimited”.  It says it on my plan, on both phones.  What does the word mean?
            Just like the service provider’s word… it means absolutely nothing. 

          • jason w.s.

            Is your phone rooted in any way? Because if it is, then you are not using your phone “as agreed in the terms”

          • Anonymous

            Its the exact same as having a router, in my opinion, like the guy above you said. I pay for a single modem for my Comcast connection. I install a router and can share the connection to as many PCs, heck, even other apartments if I so choose, limited only by the available bandwidth and capabilities of the modem and router. Its like Comcast saying I can’t have a router with my main service and can only use their provided modem with a single PC, but if I pay them an extra 30 bucks a month, I can have a router and share the connection to as maaaaaany devices as I want. No extra bandwidth, no extra services, just the ABILITY to share my connection. Really?
            I know the moral dilema of free tethering when they offer a paid tethering option is out there, but their business model is stupid. “Unlimited” should mean just that…else change the name to “Single Device, Limited Data Plan”. Unlimited is a cool buzzword that draws people in and drives sales. Read the fine print, it does say you can be soft capped after X amount of bandwidth, and thats fine. Thats not unlimited…its unlimited* (restrictions may apply). I’ve tethered in the past, but only when I needed an internet connection where there wasn’t one. I’m not paying Verizon another 30 bucks a month, PER DEVICE, on top of the 200+ a month I give them for our plan for incidental, occasional use of their “unlimited” data services.

            The fact that there is an option to PAY for tethering means their network should be able to handle potentially every single Verizon Wireless customer tethering at the same time and it comes down to pure greed, 100%.

          • Anonymous

            I agree its a money thing to the carriers. Im only agreeing that to them it
            is steeling per there rules. Do i think i should be allowed to teether no
            cause i don’t pay for that service i pay for my phone to have that service.
            Would it be nice if they weren’t money hungry and would allow it since there
            network has the ability to handle it? YES!! But when we see
            big corporate companies CARE about there customers is well never.

          • Anonymous

            You don’t pay to have cable TV or internet run to each room. The only argument you have is if you let the provider install it for you in each room and if that is the case, you are paying for the installation service. Not the provided information service. Using satellite TV could be your only case and to be honest, even that is false in your are paying to lease each box from the company, not the data being sent to each room.

        • Anonymous

          Its the same why they want to run the phone data. Just like u pay for your
          office to have internet you are paying the carriers to have internet for
          your phone and only your phone. Thats there TOS.

      • There is a difference because you are allowing multiple users to have access to your data stream. What most people who use wireless tether do, is use their ‘unlimited’ data plan to access data on a wifi only device like a tablet. I doubt people are using their wireless tether on a Droid X to let all of their friends use their mobile hotspot. If I am paying for cable and internet at my house, I should be allowed to run it on any tv and any wireless device I own, not my neighbors.

        • Anonymous

          I agree with this… its a completly different issue..

        • Anonymous

          But that data plan isnt a unlimited to what ever u can connect to thats the point. I see nothing wrong with tethering you want to then do it but its the way the TOS has been set up it favors them. U pay to have unlimited data to your phone. If you want to share that data then they charge to share it. When you teether it is no longer your phone using that data its what ever u have hooked to it. Which to them is “allowing multiple users to have access to your data stream” Cause your phone is the only paid user not the teether devices.

          • Macosx

            I think you’re a bit confused on the law. You are allowed to share your cable subscription as long as its within the same address, as you’re paying for an address’s subscription. Its legal for you to put a wireless router right up against your property line, and allow your neighbor to access it for free. He can even repeat that signal for his neighbor if he likes.

            Likewise, the same is true for DVDs… regardless of what the movie companies say, the fact is you do have the right to rip it to your computer, tablet, desktop, etc… you don’t have the right to charge anyone for watching it or provide a copy to someone else (the original can be shared, or a copy as long as the purchased item is only available to one person at a time)

          • Anonymous

            Fair use of media says you can have a backup copy. BUT all ripping software is considered illegal thanks to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. Section 1201 of the law bans software designed for “circumventing a technological measure”–in this case, the CSS, a copy-protection algorithm in commercial DVDs. SO yes ripping a dvd is illegal but having a backup isn’t. So in the act of making your back up you are breaking the copyright laws.

          • Guest

            you just can’t sell it but you can share the movie with other devices you own

          • jason w.s.

            Lol, it all reminds me of dealing with itunes. If you have a couple ipads, a couple iphones, and 4 ipods in your house, and you share an itunes account, good luck syncing all those up. Its a clusterfuck.

          • Anonymous

            Yup lol

        • Anonymous

          Spot on, David.

      • Anonymous

        Your logic is wrong in the fact that you are giving it to other customers. If I buy cable, I am allowed to use it on any TV in my house for free. You are exaggerating the truth.

        • Anonymous

          You pay for your house to have cable right? Remember for your house. You pay
          VZW or At&t or who ever you use for data to your phone and only your phone.
          Thats there TOS. Just like some cable companies charge per room. You pay per
          month to have a box in that room. Some get away with having to do this is if
          there TV has a digital tunner. This will end with as more and more cable
          providers are now encrypting there signals. At some point you will have to
          have either a set top box OR a Cable card install to your tv which will also
          be a per month charge. Its how they make money set up TOS to work in there
          favor. Which in VZW eyes and there TOS tethering is stealing.

    • Greg

      My thoughts exactly..

    • i feel you. I pay for an unlimited data plan since the first iPhone and now I can’t use it if I want to use my laptop for a quick thing or email. Its not like most of us are downloading torrents on it. Heck even Comcast puts caps on my internet. Really?

    • Miketomlison

      Because it’s pure and simple greed. There is nothing else to it. They are raping everyone for as much money as they can get. That is it. End of story. It’s not about Data or clustering the network, its about money. They want to weasel every single penny out of you.

      • Mike

        Jeez, it’s like some kind of business or something!

        • jason w.s.

          I know! Whats with these A-Hole businesses?? Trying to go and make a profit off of customers by providing a service and whatnot… that is just simply unheard of! Nonsense i tell you…

    • Anonymous

      I agree

    • Anonymous

      This pisses me off…. honestly.. its like paying for your car and NO ONE ELSE can jump on it. F that!

      • jason w.s.

        And actually, i think depending on where you live, as far as your car insurance is concerned, no one else is covered to “jump on it”

      • no, its like paying for unlimited gas for a scooter, and then showing up with an SUV.

    • Calculatorwatch

      I think the real problem is that there is using unlimited and then there is abusing it, and it’s much easier for people to abuse it when they have 2 or 3 other devices still using the same data plan.

      Unfortunately, this is entirely the wrong solution and instead of blocking tethering verizon should just cap the unlimited plan at 5gb/month and let us use it however we want.

    • Zero Cypher

      agreed.

    • Anonymous

      Totally agree with you. I have never “shared” data with anyone but myself. I tether it to my own iPad for my own personal use. It’s kind of like the Amazon cloud. If I pay you for the song, I should be able to play it unlimited times on any device I choose.

      • You have it all wrong, you’re paying for data for your phone, not for yourself. Anyone can use your phone to access data, yet you can ONLY use data on your PHONE, NOT whatever else you want to tether it to. YOU voluntarily signed that contract, keep that in mind.

    • I agree with you but the way carriers see it is: “you have unlimited data for your ONE device.” Not saying I agree or disagree but that is how they look at it. They need to (and most likely will be/or have already) rewording contracts to more plainly read that tethering is not allowed unless you have a tethering plan.

    • Anonymous

      Yup. Guess that’s a rebellious attitude to take. If so, I’m joining the anarchist club!

    • Anonymous

      Considering you agreed to not tether in the contract YOU signed, they’re only making sure you’re following that contract… If you had it your way, and everyone was allowed to use the data as they please, the networks would be unusable… Wireless (3G/4G) data is nothing like landline internet connections, it’s far more limited in bandwidth, far more susceptible to slowdowns and far more costly to the carriers.

    • Doider

      i think carriers are acting like school bullies – how can u possibly imagine u can tell a customer how to use his device. it is his device and his data plan, imposing all kind of aberrations through ToS is just bullish and plain stupid.
      Here is a theme for you android developers – emulate the droid phone on the computer so that the carriers think it is the phone on the net, not the computer. lets see what they do now ha.

      carriers need a reality check or they will just make a fool of themselves.
      hope they grow up, get smarter and respect their customers and their options… duh

    • Anonymous

      Grab the app from another market like apptown.

  • Wireless Tether is not found on my OG Droid. But Barnacle Wifi Tether is still available

  • Maybe not axed, but heavily monitored. Just gotta go back to wired tether, unless they heavily monitor that to. What carriers need to understand is that “tethering” is getting old. A lot of businesses and places are offering free Wi-Fi now. And it’s catching on real quick. After a while tethering will be a thing o the past….at least that’s my opinion.

  • Blocking it from the Market is one thing, since we can always sideload it from http://code.google.com/p/android-wifi-tether/. It’s when they start monitoring you and cracking down on people they “know” are tethering that this becomes a BIG problem.

    • AC

      This will be next try to do like At&t and block third party sources, I guarntee you?!!

  • Anonymous

    I have it still installed. Still apparently works. Can’t find it in the market though. Not in my list of apps. On a DInc

  • Anonymous

    I could see wireless tether on my Thunderbolt running CM7. Market still has the Verizon tab.

  • Frencha

    8′(

  • DroidHAM

    Can they stop you from using it once you have it installed? I hope not lol

    • No but if they take the ATT route and start tracking if you’re using it they’ll send you a warning and if it continues one of two things will happen:

      1. They’ll cancel your contract and boot you from the network for violating terms of service; or
      2. Tack tethering on to your plan and start charging you (most likely).

      But I digress, billing for tethering is just stupid this day and age of smartphones. I can understand years ago when the way smartphones handled data was simpler compared to a full computer. PCs then would definitely have gobbled more data than old smartphones which had clunky browsers as the extent of their data experience. Now smartphones are practically mini computers and the data usage is pretty much on par with a full blown PC so really what’s the difference? Greedy bastards!

    • Cwzrd23

      No they cant im using mine right now lol 😉

  • Anonymous

    First

    • Deezus

      I pay Sprint for wifi tethering. I think this is the double edged sword of android. You see, I hear all the time we want netflix,we want hulu, and we want an open system. You can’t have it all your way. I’m perfectly fine with not being able to root as long as in return I get Netflix and hulu and movie rental services. I mean do you work for free?

      I would not pay for wifi tethering if it only worked on one device but because you can connect more than one device I think what I pay is fair.