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Texas Instruments Gives up on OMAP Platform for Phones, Looking to Shift Focus

Today, Texas Instruments has come out and announced that they will be looking to “shift focus” away from their mobile processor business. In a market that has become increasingly dominated by Qualcomm, NVIDIA and Samsung, Texas Instruments has not found the wiggle room to keep their business going. This could mean that we won’t see their new OMAP5 processor either.

While the OMAP Platform may have powered some of our most beloved phones like most of Motorola’s DROID line, the Galaxy Nexus, and the Kindle Fire, we won’t be seeing much out of them anymore. They do plan to continue to support current devices for the time being, but will mostly focus their efforts on a broader and more stable market, like cars.

The good news for us is that we are still getting great chips like the Snapdragon S4 and Tegra 3 in our mobile devices. At the same time though, we always love competition, and this means one less player is in the game.

Sad to see TI go?

Via:  Reuters

  • dsass600

    Why be sad? Their devices heat up, consume a ton of battery, worse performance, and have crappy GPUs attached. And don’t even get me started on the built in DACs. I’m glad. This way the next nexus is 100% going to have the Snapdragon S4 Pro with krait architecture. The only reason I would like to see the OMAP 5, is to compare the architecture’s speeds with Qualcomm’s krait. But if other processors are going to be released with A15 architecture, then I could care less. Are other processors going to be released with this architecture?

  • http://profiles.google.com/thelolotov Jacob Davis

    Oh crap.

  • Ibrick

    This is pretty sad news, of the A15 designs, the OMAP5 seemed like the best blend of speed and efficiency.

    Seeing their dual core destroying a Tegra 3 while running at half the speed of the Tegra I have to admit I got a nerd boner. This news makes sense though since there hasn’t been any news on the OMAP5, and that video was posted like a year ago now?

  • Anon

    I’ll miss them. The OMAP 4 was a great processor for Moto’s phones.

    Since I’m not a Tegra fan, that leaves Qualcomm.

  • Mario Mendez

    Texas Instruments OMAP 4 were good processors.

  • N8shon

    This definitely sucks.

  • Diablo81588

    Damn this sucks. I was waiting patiently for OMAP 5 :(

  • JoeTi

    Damn. Sad to see them go. They made a great chip that took plenty of abuse. Good luck in the car industry. Hope to overclock your chips again sometime *down the road*(pun).

  • florious80

    It’s never a good sign for consumers when there are less competition in the field. Less players = less competition = higher cost.

    Sad day.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Bobby-Wright/100000797708370 Bobby Wright

    Google needs to purchase Texas Instruments mobile processor division. Google could build its own chips for their Motorola devices. Just like what Apple does with their Ax chips for iPhone & Ipad. This would be a very smart purchase Google!

    • Mapekz

      The Ax chips are built by Samsung I’m pretty sure. I don’t think Apple builds their components, just lays out the IC board and develops the chassis.

      • Tyler Chappell

        Yep, Apple “designs” their chips, but doesn’t manufacture the chips themselves.

  • Stevedub40

    RIP TI. We will miss you!

  • kixofmyg0t

    Screw this. I am sad to see them go. I’m partial to Ti SoC’s.

    Even though this S4 powered phone I’m typing this on is indeed fast, I still wish it was a OMAP.

    I’d like to see AMD step into the ARM game.

  • LordStickMax

    hell yeah im sad to see them go. i want as much as possible designed and made in america

  • JoshGroff

    Please have one of the new Nexus devices be released with an OMAP 5. That will help me cope with the loss.

  • Apostrafee

    Damn…that sucks

  • trophynuts

    I’ve been a TI fan since the DroidX days. But hey if Snapdragon is just as good or better then so be it.

  • zepfloyd

    This is quite sad news. TI provides some of the best documentation in the business, and is very developer friendly (partially why it was in the Nexus). At the same time, they’ve waited so long out of the gate to get OMAP 5 going it’s not surprising.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=10215724 Raj Bhatt

    OMAP chips handle overclocking so well. By the time I was ready to switch phones, my OG was running at nearly triple the intended clock speed.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Justin-Moore/100000103458508 Justin Moore

    This is a terrible shame. I’ve always been partial to TI’s chips.

  • http://twitter.com/madduffy Colin Chen

    I was always under the impression that OMAP processors were easier for the android community to support.

  • http://twitter.com/g1701gst Greg

    Sad about their being less competition but hated their slow processors in all the nice phones.

  • http://profiles.google.com/pdenson Paul Denson

    I like TI… but there’s always this: http://xkcd.com/768/

  • Alan Paone

    Moto’s uncrackable bootloaders were facilitated by security features built into their OMAP chips. The death of OMAP is a boon for ROMers!

  • http://twitter.com/cheese cheese

    Boo. Less competition

  • Levi Wilcox

    Always had much better results OCing OMAP chips compared to any other chipset manufacturer.

    • cooksta32676

      With newer architecture, more memory, and better ROM development, there isn’t a serious need for over clocking.

      • Levi Wilcox

        For sure. I don’t even OC my Galaxy Nexus. But back in the days of the OG Droid, nothing OC’d like an OMAP.

        • Nick S

          Give that GNex another year or so, and I know I’ll be OC’ing mine (it will probably be in the hands of my wife or son by then lol) – I am sad to see TI dropping out of the mobile processor biz.

      • John

        There will always be a serious need for over clocking :)

        • JoshGroff

          Yeah, if Crysis gets ported to Android. >.>

  • JoshGroff

    I will miss them for sure, TI makes some fantastic chips.

  • lrohenaz

    Mixed feelings for me. I appreciate TI’s efforts and love competition as you said… but in the world of processors fewer players means greater general compatibility. Maybe one day we will have both somehow

    • Murali Ponnaluri

      Exactly, this guy gets it. I for one am excited to see them go. I rather have fewer chipsets in the market for better comparability for future Android releases. Now someone please tell Intel they are too late for the party.

  • ddevito

    What about OMAP 5???

  • Tony Allen

    They were the most open about their chipsets source wise. Will be sad to see them go but they did drag their feet on the OMAP5 for so long.

    • http://profiles.google.com/jubakuba Kit Tihonovich

      This was the only (albeit big) downside that immediately popped into my head.
      As far as performance…they’ve always lagged behind, in my opinion.

      • michael arazan

        I don’t think they had a quad-core chip-set ready to go yet, and next year all high end phones will have quad-core with 2 gb ram, and they probably lost a few contracts by not having more powerful chips. I’m sure they’ll be back in a few years after some type of break through, everything is getting smaller and faster, and TI once set the pace for smaller and faster for decades, I’m sure they’ll be back

  • Michael_NM

    Oh snap… Dragon…

    • http://www.facebook.com/187inmotion Abraham Abundis

      You sir are very punny

    • Sloan Marion

      You made me smile like a retard in public, +1

      • hyperbolee

        retards smile different in public than private?

  • htowngtr

    I know their OMAP5 was supposed to be better if not on par with the newest S4 pros, right?

  • http://twitter.com/dtriscari19 David Triscari

    Can’t blame them, but still a shame.