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Galaxy Nexus on Verizon Could Have Better Than Expected Battery Life? (Updated)

According to the screenshot above, along with its owner, the 4G LTE version of the Samsung Galaxy Nexus is getting much better battery life than I think any of us expected. After more than 5 hours of heavy (“lots of surfing” and brightness at max) of use, you can see that the device still has 45% left on it. For having a 4.65″ HD screen with an LTE chip in it, I’d take that any day. Most 4G LTE phones are begging for a charger after 5 hours of even moderate to low use, so this is potentially a good sign for those of us that were already contemplating the purchase of a yet-be-announced extended battery.

This device test was also reportedly done on LTE only.

Update:  Same source that posted this screenshot is saying that over time, his battery has actually gotten slightly worse. On average, he is hitting around 6 hours. Here’s to hoping we actually do get a bigger 1850mAh battery in it.

On a semi-related note, seeing a screenshot with a 720p resolution makes me smile. Can you believe that we are about to embark on a journey that includes an HD screen in the palm of our hand? And not too far off are quad-core processors behind them.

Soooo, does that make your battery concerns less frightening?

Cheers guy who many of you probably know that asked to remain nameless for some reason!

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_TIPIL3NBQSPA6HFYWUG76ZMU6E lilmoe 2002

    with newer CPUs, each core runs faster and consumes less power than
    previous generations (on the same clock speed), which means cpu
    intensive operations finish “faster” on a single thread. but when you
    split the load on multiple cores, the time (and power) spent processing
    threads will also decrease.

    An example; if you have a task that takes a single core 10 seconds to
    execute 10 threads, it should take a dual core 5 seconds in theory. part
    of the power savings comes from the time saved in processing, and part
    comes from improved battery life of each core.

    some modern designs also designate a “lower power” “helper” core to do
    simple tasks and other tasks when the device is on standby. that also
    reduces the power consumption considerably (also in theory). some future
    designs also will include an additional helping core (probably for
    background garbage collection in the case of android). meaning there
    will be 2 full fledged cores, and 2 “lower power” cores, making the chip
    a quad core…

    it’s also worthy to mention that Android 4.0 ICS and future Android
    distributions will fully utilize the GPU for UI rendering, relieving the
    CPU from those nasty rendering tasks. while GPUs generally consume more
    power than CPUs, the time it takes the GPU to render graphics is
    exponentially shorter than that of a CPU. This will also result in more
    power savings. ICS will also fully utilize all the cores, allowing tasks
    to finish in a shorter and other cores to handle garbage collection.

    However, when a Gingerbread device gets an official ICS updates, with no
    bugs. then, and only then, will we be able to test out those theories.

    For those who are concerned about LTE power consumption, all the above
    does NOT apply to the power consumed by LTE. The power saved by the OS
    on tasks is insignificant compared to the power consumed by the LTE
    radio. I’ve read that Qualcomm (and others) is working on a 28nm LTE
    modem embedded in their chipset. Now THAT is what you should be waiting
    for before you jump the gun. If it were me, I’d wait for a device with
    the new chip, which should also be powerd by ICS (or later versions).

  • Anonymous

    As an owner of a dual-core, I have to say battery life is way more important to me than HD screen resolution,

  • Anonymous

    Who removes “r u mad bro” comments? It is very annoying but time spent that way is inefficient..

  • Jason Hartung

    My DroidX can hit this one day and be dead after a couple hours the next. This screen means nothing.

  • http://www.facebook.com/tyson.bash Tyson Bash

    I thought only the GSM version was available so how does this person have an LTE version?

  • Bobby

    Just because they say the screen is 720p doesn’t mean it’ll have superior quality. 720p is just the resolution, and HD is pretty much a gimmick. Look at the superior quality screen in the Motorola Xoom. That thing is a joke. With all that being said I’m not saying that the G Next won’t have a nice screen.

  • Prickee

    Probably better battery life because there is no BLOATWARE LOL

  • Ndtigger

    I think that is not true.
    Phone idle comsumed 6% of battery capacity.
    It means phone idle consumed 57.75mAh (= 1750 x 0.55 x 0.06)
    As I know, phone idle consumes under 5mA.
    As a result, phone idle consumed the battery for more than 11 hours.

    And if the user used browser application for “the surfing” and the picture of “battery use” have to show that application. but it doesn’t.
    I can see only android keyboard application
    It does not make sense.
    It’s a lie….

    And if the user used browser application for “the surfing” and the picture of “battery use” have to show that application. but it doesn’t.
    Only I can see android keyboard application
    It does not make sense.
    It’s a lie…. 

    • http://www.eckernet.com Anonymous

      Depends on what the 4G radio is considered part of.  I’d argue it’s probably part of Android OS, but that’s my thought.

    • Anonymous

      That really does sound true, I think you are right…

  • Anonymous

    Verizon.  Hi.  Significant portion (maybe major majority) in the Android enthusiast community here.
    Umm, yeaahhhh.  If you could just go ahead and give us a date that we can give you our money and pick up a Galaxy Nexus, that would be great.
    And, before I forget, Friday is Hawaiian shirt day.  So if you’d like you can goa ahead and wear a Hawaiian shirt and jeans.
    Peter, can I go ahead and talk to you about those TPS reports?

  • http://www.getintonursing.com/ Jon

    Dejavu? I remember a similar article on this site about the Droid Bionic. Turns out that the Droid Bionic has pretty mediocre battery life (as expected). 

    Don’t get your panties in a wad a bout battery life on any 4G phone. I’ll wait and see. 

  • Anonymous

    That screenshot doesn’t show the browser as anything near the top battery drainer, I’m not sure that this proves anything. I guess we’ll have to see.

  • Anonymous

    You guys did this with the Bionic…The story to the screenshot is BS.  If there was lots of surfing then the browser would be on the app list of what is using the battery. Don’t the people who post these stories actually know how to use an Android device?  The device was on for 5 hours and 13 minutes doing shit and the battery lost 55% and that is good?

    Please think better of your readers, we are all not that dumb.

    Thanks!

  • Anonymous

    Ok this is running on 4g lte. I live in a 3G city. So I should have alot better battery life as long as I keep it in 3G mode, correct?

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=862090603 Ozzy-The Widow Maker-Gee

      correct. when you get this device, if you decide to, just go into Network Settings and switch it from LTE/CDMA to CDMA only.

  • freda

    Is everyone on the rag this month? Sheesh