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Revisiting Android Task Killers and Why You Still Don’t Need One…

We almost hate to approach the topic of Task Killers on Android after all this time, but with so many new faces here at Droid Life and in Android in general, it’s something that needs to be done.  In fact, after seeing the Amazon app of the day and reading through the Twitter conversations we just had with many of you, this thing needs to be posted immediately.  Let’s see if we can’t get you all some better battery life!

First off, please ignore the image up at the top of the post.  If this was 2009 and we were all running something less than Android 2.2, that statement plastered on that red banner might be somewhat correct.  But since it is 2011 and the majority of people on the planet are running Android 2.2, we need to get you away from the mindset that killing off tasks on your phone is a good thing.

So rather than me blabbering about the inner-workings of Android and how it manages RAM for the 10,000th time, I’m going to just pull from some posts that friends of ours have done that explain this in the plainest of ways.  

First up is our boy @cvpcs who you may know from CM and his Sapphire ROM days.  He knows Android inside-and-out, so when he goes into memory management which is done by the OS itself, you should listen up:

What people don’t seem to realize is that android is designed to have a large number of tasks stored in memory at all times. Why? Well basically we are talking about a mobile device. On a mobile device things tend to be slower. The hardware isn’t as robust as say a desktop or a laptop, so in order to get that same “snappy” feeling, there have to be workarounds.

One of these is how android deals with memory. Android will load up your apps and then keep them running until they absolutely HAVE to kill them. This is because that way, if you want to re-open an app, the system already has it loaded and can then just resume it instead of reloading it. This provides a significant performance increase.

What a lot of people don’t realize as well is that android kernels have their own task manager. This means that:

  1. it will be more efficient than any app-based task manager as it is run at the kernel level, and
  2. it should be left up to that task killer to decide when to free up memory

There is only one case where having a task killer is a good idea, and that is when you want to kill ONE SPECIFIC APP. Killing all apps is never a good idea. You don’t know what operations they are performing or if they are necessary.

Whitson Gordon of Lifehacker suggests that you should be more worried about CPU usage than what’s going on with your RAM.  We agree:

This set-up implies that the goal of killing these apps is to free up memory. Nowhere on the list does it mention the number of CPU cycles each app is consuming, only the memory you’ll free by killing it. As we’ve learned, full memory is not a bad thing—we want to watch out for the CPU, the resource that actually slows down your phone and drains your battery life.

Thus, killing all but the essential apps (or telling Android to kill apps more aggressively with the “autokill” feature) is generally unnecessary. Furthermore, it’s actually possible that this will worsen your phone’s performance and battery life. Whether you’re manually killing apps all the time or telling the task killer to aggressively remove apps from your memory, you’re actually using CPU cycles when you otherwise wouldn’t—killing apps that aren’t doing anything in the first place.

In fact, some of the processes related to those apps will actually start right back up, further draining your CPU. If they don’t, killing those processes can cause other sorts of problems—alarms don’t go off, you don’t receive text messages, or other related apps may force close without warning. All in all, you’re usually better off letting your phone work as intended—especially if you’re more of a casual user. In these instances, a task killer causes more problems than it solves.

More on how Android has a built-in memory-management system, but also on how killing all tasks is not a good thing (via: NextApp):

Android was designed from the ground up as an operating system (OS) for mobile devices. Its built-in application and memory-management systems were engineered with battery life as one of the most critical concerns.

The Android OS does not work like a desktop operating system. On a desktop OS, like Windows, Mac OS X, or Ubuntu Linux, the user is responsible for closing programs in order to keep a reasonable amount of memory available. On Android, this is not the case. The OS itself automatically removes programs from memory as memory is needed. The OS may also preload applications into memory which it thinks might soon be needed.

Having lots of available empty memory is not a good thing. It takes the same amount of power to hold “nothing” in memory as it does to hold actual data. So, like every other operating system in use today, Android does its best to keep as much important/likely-to-be-used information in memory as possible.

As such, using the task manager feature of SystemPanel to constantly clear memory by killing all apps is strongly NOT RECOMMENDED. This also applies to any other task killer / management program. Generally speaking, you should only “End” applications if you see one which is not working correctly. The “End All” feature can be used if your phone/device is performing poorly and you are uncertain of the cause.

And we could go on for hours with source after source on why task killers do nothing but work against Android, but you probably get the point now don’t you?  Ready for a quick recap?  OK.

Basically, Android keeps tasks handy because it thinks you’ll want to perform them again in a very short amount of time.  If you don’t, it will clear them out for you.  It also likes to keep as many things handy as possible so that the overall performance of your device is top notch.  If Android were to completely kill off everything that your phone is doing, then it would require more resources to restart all of them and you would likely run into slowness and battery drains.  By keeping certain things available to you, your phone is actually running better than it would without.  So please, stop killing off tasks and let Android do the work for you.

Your goal for the week is wash your brain of the idea that having little RAM available is a bad thing.  The more RAM available, the more Android will find ways to use it up which means your battery will be dead in hours.  Instead, let it manage itself, so that you can spend more time playing Angry Birds or reading Droid Life.

All good now?

  • Brittany

    I have a Android giner bread phone with metro pcs and I had the advanced task killer on my phone and It KILLED MY BATTERY BAD SO I ASKED SOMEONE WHAT what there oppion was on the TASK KILLER and they said its a BAD IDEA SO I WOULD NOT RECOMMEND THIS APP TO ANYONE THAT WANTS TO SAVE THERE BATTERY LIFE!!! 

  • 1poptart

    Is it alright to use the stock app killer that comes built in on android deivces?

  • Brett Selph

    For the “geniuses” who supposedly know Android inside and out, you are wrong. You are repeating what each other says, it has become an echo chamber, and you have staked out a position that is incorrect.
    Android might be “designed” to load up on tasks, keeping memory as full to the brim with “ready” tasks, as possible …but Android being INTENTIONALLY designed this way, versus this choice actually constituting GOOD design, are two different issues. And there existing a ROCK SOLID IMPLEMENTATION of the design goals (that STILL WORKS after Verizon has mucked with it)… is yet another issue. It’s not good enough to tell me they did it this way “on purpose”. The world is full of bad design choices that were made quite intentionally. And this particular design choice was motivated not to save battery but by a desire to increase the apparent responsiveness of Android by preloading code that might be needed very soon. It most certainly does NOT save battery. In fact, it wastes it every time something is loaded that isn’t later used, and all of the juice used to load it, wasted. That’s called a trade-off.
    A road intersection intentionally designed with no stop-signs and no traffic lights …would have higher thruput if those idiot drivers didn’t do stupid things like try to drive thru the intersection at the same time! Nothing wrong with my BRILLIANT design of the intersection! It’s the stupid drivers!
    Predictive preloading of tasks WOULD be a good design choice if there were no downsides and no way it could go wrong. It would be a good design choice if the implementation were so good that all of the ways it COULD go wrong, had been thoroughly debugged and everything tuned to a fare-thee-well. But task management on real-world Android phones is a chaotic, buggy, crash-and-reboot nightmare. I don’t care what Android fanboys say about noobs being stupid and the experience and naive users being irrelevant (nor do I believe that fanboys fully admit to the number of crashes they themselves experience). In fact, Android, for all its initial promise, is now a gawdawful mess. And the fanboys know it.
    Saying that battery is being wasted by the user who (in a supposed state of “Android ignorance”) keeps killing tasks, is twisting things around and blaming the wrong party. If Android keeps burning battery by reloading the same tasks that i have just INTENTIONALLY killed, it is Android that is wasting battery, not me. There are very good reasons to kill tasks, NOT, as claimed, only ONE justified case (killing a “badly behaved” app). Indeed, I kill perfectly well-behaved apps all the time …not because ANY of the apps I kill are behaving badly, but because Android itself is not doing a very good job of making enough memory available to the tasks I want to run. And even if “badly behaved” apps are to be blamed, one wonders what Android apologists expect. They are holding appications to a far higher standard than they hold Android itself. If a developer like Yahoo is unable to develop “well behaved” apps, despite employing top-talent programmers, extensive testing, and constant bug-fixes … then there is clearly something ELSE wrong with the Android picture besides a few half-assed programmers putting out obscure junk.
    Using Yahoo Messenger as an example, if you have many dozens of contacts, and if you never clear the your chat history (not because you’re too stooopid to know how, but because you NEED to keep that history…) well, in such a case, the YM app becomes slower and slower, and more and more of a memory hog. If Android “sees” that the user is interacting with the YM app, and if the YM task is requesting more storage, but Android insists on withholding that storage and instead loads into that storage “First Aid”, “Maps”, “Google+”, “ReChat”, “Facebook”, “WikiDroid”, and six other tasks… DESPITE the fact that i haven’t used some of these apps in several weeks (and have used NONE of them since I last booted my phone) …one is forced to wonder about the ivory-tower assumptions of the Android designers.
    The user experiences a dramatic slowdown in YM, followed by a freeze-out. My keypresses are ignored. Swype ignores my swyping. After a while, the phone comes partially back to life… some of my keypresses are honored, but since i have to retype ignored keypresses and can’t distinguish ignored ones from keypresses that are just wading thru some kind of Android molasses, what i see in actual practice is a mixture of missing words and text duplications. This is called user frustration, fanboy. I look up at my task count (my task-killer shows this number in a little box in the notification area), and I notice that the number of loaded tasks has crept up from 3 tasks to 10. The utterly unresponsive period was when Android was “helpfully” loading those 7 unwanted tasks. Now that they are loaded, YM has thawed just a bit, but is now very slow and quirky, because it is now living inside of a little memory box that is smaller than what it needs. If I don’t wait too long, I can bring up my task killer and knock off the competing (and useless) tasks, which instantly restores YM to peppy responsiveness and predictable behavior. But constantly killing tasks is itself a big pain. So often I just put up with the memory misallocation molasses and hope that I don’t get any incoming texts from other online friends. Because that will freeze my phone to the point where I have to yank the battery.
    A reboot. My fingernails are actually becoming chipped from prying off the back cover so often. Since the OS is usually locked up at this point, a soft reboot using the button on the side of the phone, generally doesn’t work. I’m wondering why the designers of the Galaxy didn’t include a HARDWARE power button, one that physically interrupts the power. I mean, they knew they were going to be running Android, right?
    These frequent freeze-outs and repetitious reboots interrupt whatever i was doing on a regular basis. I don’t like it, but it does give me plenty of time to think. So I wax philosophical, on topics like Marketing imperatives intruding on OS design choices. Images of pimping out a potentially good OS, to the Marketing department before it is installed. I’m drumming my fingers, thinking… Hmmmm, Dear Android fanboy …doesn’t it take lots of time and a fair amount of battery to reboot? Fanboy… what our the design-goal again? Fanboy, can you explain again to me why it’s a good thing for Android to preload apps I wasn’t planning on using, like Facebook, WikiDroid and Google+? Fanboy, the only app I’m using right now is YM, which is asking for more memory. Why isn’t Android giving Yahoo Messenger the memory it is requesting, even though there is plenty of memory available? I’ve got time to listen to your explanation, fanboy, because Android is still rebooting…

  • mason

    I have encountered many times, certain app wont start/response until I clear the memory and even it is only have full

    • mason

      sory it should be half full. and always lagging after more ram used

      • Anonymous

        Same here. Everytime I experienced lagging while scrolling through the homescreens or in-apps, I’ll just head over to the task killer and kill all running programs. Works wonders everytime. 

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Donald-Goldsmith/100000982745355 Donald Goldsmith

    In a perfect World I guess your reasoning would be excellent…But the worlds much less than perfect and my tablet gets bogged down.
    When I terminate an app and from the home screen select the app screen the screen goes black and you wait……………………………………………..and wait………………………………………………………and wait…………………………..then usually a message saying ” Sorry! Activity Launcher (in application Launcher) is not responding and gives you s choice of Force close or Wait ………….and then another message….. Sorry The application Launcher (process com.android.launcher) has stopped unexpectedly please try again… Cannot figure why it was unexpected it happens ALL the time.

  • http://twitter.com/trivialproblems Nate Ledwith

    Printed this out, posted it at my vzw store

  • http://twitter.com/Synacks Synacks

    When I read about this months ago, I ditched every single task killer I ever tried to use. Not only do I get better battery life with my Fascinate and Droid Charge, but I’m not always closing apps constantly, wasting time, and constantly monitoring my battery life. It’s a pain in the arse. If you want to do something good for your phone task related, root it and freeze/uninstall all bloatware. That’ll do you good.

  • Rdatmans

    Killing unnecessary background apps conserves battery!!! A background app that is not needed consumes battery by using processor cycles to perform tasks like updates. Screen display and air-time are going to be the biggest battery hogs along with the speaker and camera. Background running apps are probably not your battery hogs unless they are performing periodic task that go on the air or open the screen display, make sounds, etc. Another possibility of apps using battery are when they force the processor to increase duty due to demand load. Some processors today have throttle capabilities to throttle up or down to meet the demand.

    Multi-core processors will use more battery as they consume more power to perform simultaneous instructions. The larger the screen, the more battery it will take to power it. Older smaller screens may take as much battery as newer large screens due to advancements in screen power efficiency that permits newer larger screen to use no more power than older screen of lesser size. I’m not sure how much the technology has improved, but a 3.2 inch screen will most likely use far less power than a 4.5 inch screen. It takes a lot of juice to light up the real-estate of a 4.5 inch screen.

    Droid OS will show you where the battery is being consumed which may vary quite a bit from user to user.

  • Spc Hicks09

    This post made me get rid of my task killer, even though I know for a fact that I had better battery life using one.

  • CyberPete

    Check out “SystemPanel App / Task Manager” by NextApp, Inc. on the market.
    They also have a fully-functional lite version that is free.
    It is mainly an informational app but, among other useful things, gives you nice easy graphical info about what is using the most CPU, with history.  The history part is important because you may not actually catch the app misbehaving exactly when you look at it. You can quickly see which app is being naughty, and kill it. (it also has a “kill all” button for last resort)
    This provides nothing that you can’t already do with Android’s app manager, but it is much easier.  There are other monitoring apps as well, I have no connection with this one except that I’ve used it and it works for me.
     

  • ProfessandObey

    Does this idea apply to the “allow purging of assets” setting in CM7? How about regularly clearing the cache?

    I’m running an OG Droid on CM7 and the way I’ve been trying to compensate for the low RAM is by enabling purging of assets. I know compcache makes the cpu work more. Should I consider enabling a swap partition on the SD card instead?

  • http://www.facebook.com/mikelierman Michael Lierman

    I absolutely hate task killers, the modern ones at least. The ones that kill suspended tasks from Android memory to “speed up your phone” or “increase battery life.” However, I have made one task killer an exception, which I came built-in to my Galaxy Tablet 7.0″. It doesn’t “kill” the kills, it lists the ones that have windows open and shows the CPU it’s using, and allows you to “exit” that application. Useful when an application freeze, which has been on occasion. Still I know plenty of people that have their task killer set to kill all tasks when the screen turns off. Yeah, good way to kill your battery, especially since it then takes longer to open your apps, and the system just restarts like half of those anyways.

  • http://twitter.com/dpruth Dan Ruth

    Thanks. As an only occasional reader of DL, I had missed this topic come up before. I didn’t use Taskiller much, but always felt like I SHOULD use it more. Glad to know I wasn’t wasting my time.

  • http://twitter.com/mikeszekely Mike Szekely

    Didn’t use one on my Incredible.  Don’t use one on my Thunderbolt.  I had no trouble getting 36 hours on the Incredible.  36 is difficult on the Thunderbolt, but 18 is no sweat.

    • Draven13X

      36 hours??? What?? How?? My wife and I both have the Incredible. Hers is dead after about 8 hours if that… mine after about 10-12. Granted, she uses hers for phone calls more then I use mine. I’m usually texting or using the browser. Now, for the past week mine says its low on memory. And that I should change my settings for my mail, or delete any unused apps. What gives? I have deleted some apps that I just don’t use much. But trying to change my mail settings was crap! It didn’t do a thing! Oh, and no task killer, ever, on my phone…. short of the factory one!

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=705034 Jeff Simpson

    I used to agree with this 100% – but in the last year, apps have doubled or tripled in size and my poor original Droid just doesn’t have the ram needed to keep up with the times. It’s to the point where if I don’t kill background tasks I don’t want, the ones I DO want will be killed if I, say, try to navigate and listen to music at the same time. When you have plenty of memory, absolutely by all means the automatic task killing nature of android works great, but when you only have enough ram to run two things at a time, I want to pick what those two things are, not have pandora keep jumping back into ram when I’m not even listening to it.

  • Brett328

    Was at the VZW store yesterday due to random reboots.  Tech guy grabs my phone, downloads and installs Advanced Task Killer as soon as he hears me say “reboots”.  Says this should fix my problem!  I’ve seen all these threads and arguments against the task killer, so I was seriously expecting no results, and figured I’d be back in a day or 2 to demand a new phone. 

      Guess what?  So far no reboots!  So maybe I sacrifice some battery life for fewer reboots?  I’d do that in a second!

    • http://twitter.com/Skitz_Marz Alex Gandero

      which phone?

  • Brett328

    Was at the VZW store yesterday due to random reboots.  Tech guy grabs my phone, downloads and installs Advanced Task Killer as soon as he hears me say “reboots”.  Says this should fix my problem!  I’ve seen all these threads and arguments against the task killer, so I was seriously expecting no results, and figured I’d be back in a day or 2 to demand a new phone. 

      Guess what?  So far no reboots!  So maybe I sacrifice some battery life for fewer reboots?  I’d do that in a second!

  • http://twitter.com/dewguzzler Jesse Perkins

    i still use advanced task killer because sometimes i just want to kill it all, whether ‘all kernels support task killing built in’ i know there are a lot of background apps that still run somethat ive only installed to theme and have never opened up which isnt a problem until the memory starts getting clogged and sometimes i just want to end it all, (not a suicidal comment) lol

  • http://twitter.com/nashmax73 TomAss (TA)

    I think the real answer I seek is an easy way to kill OR freeze all the %*$&ing bloatware without having to root or remove those apps, since that will bar us from receiving OTA upgrades to say….oh…..gingerbread, which is what I’m patiently awaiting for on my HTC Thunderbolt.    [sigh]

  • Anonymous

    the repeated point not to kill apps is clear. But what about other solutions? People are killing apps for a reason — their devices are running slow, buggy, and freezing. More solutions would have been helpful.

  • Anonymous

    tinyurl.com/2a7usxg

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=9805608 Jeff Donovan

    I’d say one of the best things you can do to extend battery life is dim your display.  On most smartphones the display is one of the biggest battery sucks. 
    On my Thunderbolt the screen is perfectly readable at the lowest brightness setting. 

  • Droidman101

    Autokiller memory optimizer is a different story….
    It modifies what the KERNEL kills

  • Jrer34

    I’m going to do what they say and turn off auto-kill and go all day without killing any apps. I find it interesting that people have said to kill apps one by one to figure out which is causing the phone to run slowly. tried that yesterday and i ended up killing all of them. should have saved 5 minutes and just hit KILL selected apps. i guess we’ll see how today goes. 

  • Jrer34

    I’m going to do what they say and turn off auto-kill and go all day without killing any apps. I find it interesting that people have said to kill apps one by one to figure out which is causing the phone to run slowly. tried that yesterday and i ended up killing all of them. should have saved 5 minutes and just hit KILL selected apps. i guess we’ll see how today goes. 

    • Jrer34

      my phone is taking forever to sync my work email/contacts/calendar….

      • Jrer34

        I’m so glad VZ Navigator is running while im at work. i dont know how i would get around my office without it…. V CAST Apps too. not sure what i would do without those important apps running all day long 

        • Joshua Granville

          So to stop apps from running in the background you set a task killer to auto kill?  Basically making an app run in the background to constantly kill apps.  Sounds like running auto-kill would waste more battery than anything.

          • Jrer34

            I normally have it kill apps when i turn the screen off. As of now, i havent killed any apps today and there are a bunch running. my phone is running noticeably slower and battery even seems to be lower than usual at this time of the day. I just dont understand why i have 25 (i counted) apps running that i have not used and will not use the rest of the day. 

          • Jrer34

            i dont have GPS on. i use wifi at work because if i dont my battery will last 4 hours because of the 4g connectivity in my building. 

          • Jrer34

            i dont have GPS on. i use wifi at work because if i dont my battery will last 4 hours because of the 4g connectivity in my building. 

    • Jrer34

      my phone is taking forever to sync my work email/contacts/calendar….

  • http://www.droid-den.com Rachid

    I wrote an editorial trying to explain how android works in layman terms, it might be useful for those people struggling to get why task killers are the devil :P http://www.droid-den.com/android-guides/android-guide-should-i-use-a-task-killer

  • http://twitter.com/Pucuck Nicholas Ringhiser

    Lets make sure we forward this to Verizon and have them post it in all of the stores to inform the employees.

  • DroidVader

    I use a task killer to kill my LOREX app. Its an app the constantly streams live video from your security cameras. If I don’t kill it after I’m done viewing then my D2 heats up and battery gets drained very fast.

    • Nexus1ne

      android lets you force close running apps through settings>applications>manage applications.  no need for a task killer for that purpose.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jaime-Lefebvre/526186110 Jaime Lefebvre

    This argument is so played out. We use task killers to stop processes from running in the background and killing battery life. How fast an app loads is irrelevant. .03 seconds vs 1.2 seconds isn’t going to kill anyone. (arbitrary numbers)

    • http://www.droid-den.com Rachid

      Processes in the background should not kill your battery life. If specific processes do, then contact the developer of the app as he has clearly coded it poorly.

    • http://twitter.com/Skitz_Marz Alex Gandero

      it takes more power to open an app than it does to let it finish its process

  • Matthew Harmon

    So I agree with all of this.  After reading the article, how can I better manage my CPU usage?  I have ZD Box installed not for the task killer or other features, but to see my CPU usage and I’m consistently in the 40′s for free memory.  How do I read that?  Is lower better, higher better?  If it is too low, how do I increase it?  I have 2.3.3 OTA.  My phone is sluggish, I don’t understand how to make it faster.

  • Carmen Diva

    sorry, double post

  • Carmen Diva

    Sorry still dont buy it. Task killers are a must for me

    I have always installed a task killer from my original Droid to my Droid Eris to a bunch of other android devices to currently both my Droid charge and Xperia play

    I’ve used them because they are necessary. I should not have to wait for android to close an app out.

    I always used them and always will. Has made my android experience so much better.
    There is no adverse effect to using them an i recommend them to all my friends.

    • Bill

      Its not something for you to “buy”.  Its the function of how Android works.  This is not a statement of opinion.  Ask any computer programmer to look into the programming of Android and Task Killers and they’ll tell you that they don’t work to save battery life or speed up your phone.  If you want to stay in denial about it that’s fine but don’t act as if this is an opinion.

      • Carmen Diva

        What I am denying? Perhaps you should look up the definition of Denial.
        I never denied this wasn’t right….I am entitled to my opinion and I choose
        to use Task killers.
        I’ve used a phone without task killers and the experience FOR ME was 
        unbearable…Once I downloaded the task killer I had a much better experience
        using the phone FOR ME
        Perhaps Android should come up with a better way of managing running apps, idk.
        This goes beyond my intermediate knowledge of technology/android. 
        But again I never denied anything…I just prefer task killers

        • Joshua Granville

          You’re so clueless.

          • Carmen Diva

            I’m clueless because I have an opinion?

            I already stated the article was FACT but in my opinion, i still have a preference
            to use Task killers?

          • LionStone

            But what is the reasoning behind your preference to using TK? Just to tinker? Or is
            is it for better battery life? If so, I thought the Charge was already good in that dept.? I’m running stock TB and have not added any TK…of the two or three times that something wasn’t running properly, the system found it and killed it by itself. Occasionally I’ll check what’s running just to be sure all is well. After tweaking settings and sync, rarely do I have to do anything…the TB runs fine all by itself. I get 8-12 hrs/day. The one thing that uses the most battery is the display. I’m hoping after GB update that it will help with that. Then comes root…and I don’t care if I can’t get Netflix after root. 

          • LionStone

            Actually just got 16 hrs, with 30% left… no TKs  :)

          • Carmen Diva

            not so much battery life but free up RAM…but battery life is a factor

    • http://www.droid-den.com Rachid

      You dont understand how android works, i can tell from how you speak. eg “I should not have to wait for android to close an app out.” The definitions of an app being open and closed are not clear with android, due to its use of processes and intents. So that statement doesnt even really make sense when talking about android.

      i’m not attacking you, just trying to teach, so you can make a more informed decision.

      If your phone does get bogged down it is likely due to inefficient apps, the key is to recognise these and replace them with apps that actually work as android intended them to.

    • http://www.droid-den.com Rachid

      You dont understand how android works, i can tell from how you speak. eg “I should not have to wait for android to close an app out.” The definitions of an app being open and closed are not clear with android, due to its use of processes and intents. So that statement doesnt even really make sense when talking about android.

      i’m not attacking you, just trying to teach, so you can make a more informed decision.

      If your phone does get bogged down it is likely due to inefficient apps, the key is to recognise these and replace them with apps that actually work as android intended them to.

      • Carmen Diva

        what i gathered from the Article is that, Android keeps it running for short periods of time because i thinks i may wind up wanting to use it again…and it tends to keep LOTS OF APPS running because it wants my performance to be superb, top notch BUT will close the app when it is not needed/used?

        Is that wrong?

        • http://twitter.com/Skitz_Marz Alex Gandero

          not necessarily running, but open so you can come back to it faster and you don’t have to waste more of your battery on opening it from the beginning, since that uses more than just pulling it from memory

  • Rohicks

    Want to learn best practices for increasing and maximizing your battery life.
    This guide is a great start.
    http://forums.miui.us/showthread.php?160-HTC-EVO-Best-Practices-and-Battery-Management

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1639081047 Joseph DiPierno

    what about the task killer built in to android 2.3?

    • http://www.droid-den.com Rachid

      It is there to allow you to kill apps that may be coded poorly, and thus are eating at all your cpu/ram/battery. It is not there to use a “task killer”

    • http://www.droid-den.com Rachid

      It is there to allow you to kill apps that may be coded poorly, and thus are eating at all your cpu/ram/battery. It is not there to use a “task killer”