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T-Mobile Identifies Data Hogs Using P2P Sharing, Plans Attack for August 17

Data Hogs

According to an internal memo obtained by TmoNews, T-Mobile has identified “data hog” users on its network, taking advantage of their unlimited 4G LTE data plan, who utilize their bandwidth for P2P sharing and file torrenting, inevitably lowering the LTE experience for other users on the network.

T-Mobile has sent the following statement to its employees, saying that a plan of action will begin starting August 17, as contact will be made to customers who are breaking the company’s Terms and Conditions. 

As for which customers should worry about receiving a note from T-Mobile, plus a throttle down the road if data usage does not change on the user’s account, anyone with an older $70 unlimited plan or newer $80 Simple Choice plan who use their phone for P2P and file torrenting beyond a reasonable amount can expect to receive a notice.

The internal memo to employees reads as so.

T-mobile has identified customers who are heavy data users and are engaged in peer-to-peer file sharing, and tethering outside of T-Mobile’s Terms and Conditions (T&C). This results in a negative data network experience for T-Mobile customers. Beginning August 17, T-Mobile will begin to address customers who are conducting activities outside of T-Mobile’s T&Cs.

T-Mobile has also laid out its complete plan of attack against these customers, should the message about data usage go unheeded.

  1. T-Mobile will contact customers to explain terms and conditions to them, and then advise them that data speed could be reduced until the next billing cycle IF they continue to misuse the data service.
  2. When the customer is contacted, T-Mobile will apply a ‘Misuse Warning SOC’ to their account.
  3. If behavior continues, the existing warning SOC is replaced by a ‘Misuse Throttle SOC’ and their data speeds get reduced.
  4. These SOCs are visible to customer care and other staff who access the user’s account, to make it clear to them why they might be experiencing slower speeds.

As we can see, the throttling of an account is a last resort, which means T-Mobile would really like people to just use their data properly. They are giving options to customers, which actually seems rather nice of them in comparison to what they could do.

If you are one of these users, gobbling up GeeBees upon GeeBees of data, please, think of the children and use your home’s Internet connection instead.

Via: TmoNews
  • Taglogical

    P2P has fair uses. EFF, are you guys seeing this? As an example, anyone play World of Warcraft? Then you use P2P frequently for downloading game updates.

  • Brandon

    I’m one of them, but only because it’s taking Verizon a week to come fix my FiOS drop! I get a great signal in my city and used it to download 128 GB worth of stuff off of Usenet, the next day I saw this post. Luckily they’re coming to fix it on Monday!

    • Austin

      Are you in New England or the mid-Atlantic? In Texas, they even come to repair FiOS connections for down service on Sunday night! They’ve rolled a truck for me at 5:00pm on a Sunday before when my 6 year old ONT went out. When I asked about working on Sunday, they said in Texas they can work extended hours and weekends for overtime pay (voluntary schedule), but the unions “up north” won’t allow it in many other FiOS states. In fact, they told me the same type of service call I had fixed same day on Sunday was running a week in New York state.

      • Brandon

        I’m in the “Greater New York City” area aka Hoboken, NJ. If they come before 5:00 while I’m still at work I’m going to tell them to go F themselves and going to go get a modem from Optimum/Cablevision.

  • 213ninja

    LOLOLOL @ people who side with ISP’s/carriers over consumers. i feel sorry for you people, so blind…

  • does it matter

    Did this website lose the Verizon sponsorship because a couple of years ago it was pro Verizon now it’s pro t mobile. I would like to know what happens when you are a repeated abuser after multiple notices. BTW they will drop you I have seen the mobile letters terminating people for abuse. Just roam in the us as much as possible and you will see.

    • 213ninja

      methinks times a’changed…

  • StankyChikin

    So apparently T-Mobile advertises Unlimited Data plans at up to 4G LTE speeds and people see that as Unlimited Data/Unlimited Bandwidth even if they are breaking the TOS that they agreed to when they signed up for the service… Got to love the self entitlement that goes on around these parts nowadays.

  • stang6790

    So after reading this I went and checked the Verizon TOS and it reads pretty much the same but also says: “We reserve the right to limit throughput or amount of data transferred exceeding 5 GB in a given month , and to deny or terminate service, without notice, to anyone we believe is using an Unlimited Data Plan or Feature in any manner prohibited above or whose usage adversely impacts our network or service levels.” It also says in can’t be used for continuous streaming of audio or video.Therefore they are actually following their TOS with the throttling just like T-Mobile is with their restrictions.

  • John Davids

    Wow, so transparent. Giving written warnings on the bill and then giving written “You are being throttled right now and here is why” notices. Love this company.

  • Carlton Crasher

    Lol at the people who if this were Verizon would be keyboard warriors but because its T-Mobile…well that’s okay…tru fanboys

    • StankyChikin

      That was a fanboy comment if I ever read one.

      • Carlton Crasher

        Nah…I’m on at&t I regret the coverage but like the phone selection. T-Mobile can’t even get 3g for 60 miles and sometimes more depending on the direction. I miss Verizon’s coverage :( but until they carry nexus phones well I’ll pick the best

  • Eikast

    T mobile customers who are on the $80 plan are not in a contract.
    T mobile is targetting people who disobeyed their TOS by exploiting tethering (by using unofficial means to bypass the 5GB cap) to tether large amounts of data each month.

    I see no wrong doings in that. T mobile is not held to any rules places by the FCC regarding their LTE spectrum such as Verizon.
    I’m an unlimited data customer with Verizon. Verizon is at war with their unlimited data customers, T mobile is simply enforcing their rules.

  • Sporttster

    Here’s the question every single one of us should be asking these companies that advertise ‘unlimited data’- if it says unlimited, does it mean unlimited and can something be called ‘unlimited’ if the speed gets limited if one goes over a set amount deemed by the Company as too much?? IS this misleading advertising?!?

    • Ryan

      Absolutely.

    • StankyChikin

      They give you unlimited data at up to 4G LTE speeds.. Just as advertised.. How is that misleading?

  • SamBoy

    Dont they slow down data speeds after 5gbs anyway even if u are on unlimited? I see a problem with this if thats the case.

    • flosserelli

      I have T-Mobile unlimited and I am not throttled after 5 GB. I can download just as fast today as I could on day one of my billing cycle.

    • 213ninja

      that’s an old business model. now they offer a base amount of unthrottled 4G, and you can pay by GB for unthrottled 4G up to an including unlimited.

      • SamBoy

        Im completly confused by what you mean here so if u pay for untrottled data then why are they bitching about how u use it?

        • 213ninja

          I’m not sure why people on here are bitching but tmo is bitching because apparently p2p clients violate their T.o.S. agreement, which some people refer to as a contract, even on the “uncarrier”.

          Go check out their new plans on their site and you’ll see what I mean…you are unlimited LTE up to 512MB or 1GB, and then it’s pay per GB for LTE only…true unlimited when throttled though.

          • SamBoy

            Thats exactly what im saying if they drop you speeds to 2G speeds after 5Gbs anyway when you have the unlimited plan then why are they bitching it takes 30minutes to load a full page of test on 2G speeds like wtf?

          • 213ninja

            Because they have a true unlimited everything unlimited 4G LTE too…only throttled if you break ToS.

          • SamBoy

            Is that tne $80 plan?

          • 213ninja

            Yessir

  • Customer

    15 days on my billing cycle.

    • monkeybutts

      How many torrents ;)

  • mcdonsco

    Reading the comments here of aholes that use their UD vzw accounts as their home internet makes me HOPE verizon terminates UD accounts for anyone using more than 40gb’s a month.

    • Ryan

      Is this a joke? Torennting is one thing because generally it’s considered an illegal exchange/Piracy. But if I want to use my unlimited and tether, having paid for it, why the heck shouldn’t I? I don’t understand this asinine, socialistic veiw that I shouldn’t be able to use the UNLIMITED data that I paid for, without any limits. It blows my mind that people are so illogical. The word doesn’t revolve around you. You have the plan that you have and you have to deal with it. Instead of attacking people because they’re in a much better situation than you and you’re jealous, blame the company for no longer being able to a effectively back up the plans they provided.

      • StankyChikin

        90% of what you just said here is so untrue that I don’t even know where to begin.

        • Ryan

          It’s “untrue” that I should be able to use my unlimited plan, without limits, like it says… As long as I’m within terms and conditions and the law? That makes sense.

          • StankyChikin

            Unlimited Data at up to 4G LTE speeds. Meaning you can consume as much data as you like as speeds will allow per their TOS. You break their TOS and they can kick you off the network.. I think that they are being nice in just throttling those that are breaking the TOS that they agreed to when they signed up for their service.

        • 213ninja

          makes sense to me. i pay for unlimited so therefore i can use unlimited. anyone saying otherwise is just an idiot.

          • Ryan

            Thank god there are still some logical people out there.

      • Turb0wned

        Agree.

      • mcdonsco

        Its unlimited MOBILE data jackass.

        • Ryan

          By that definition, teetering shouldn’t exist. But, since it does, and one could pay for it, then I can tether whatever the hell I want. You still have yet to make one logical claim against what I said. Just because I have more than you doesn’t mean that I should be punished.

          • Ryan

            Tethering *

          • mcdonsco

            Do you not understand what the word MOBILE means?

          • Ryan

            Okay… So let me get this straight. Your issue that someone could use it for their home Internet.

            Okay, let’s say they do that and use 50 gigs. That’s “wrong.”

            Now let’s say they don’t have a TV or computer. Just a tablet. So they tether to that. Which is still mobile. And use 1000 gigs. This is okay because it’s still mobile.

            Got it.

          • hoosiercub88

            Do you?

            The unlimited data is just part of the phones mobile network connection. Using it in anyway possible as the OEM intended, I don’t see as a problem. If someone wants to use 50Gb a month I think they should be allowed to, no matter how they feel the need.

            I don’t know why people are so up in arms about this, it’s not like anything is being taken from you. If you think that those people are causing the problems for other users on the network.. let’s think about it this way.

            An office building has 100 computers, they have a 100Mb connection throughput for the entire building. Everyone shares the network and everyone is connected to it.. whenever someone tries to download something that isn’t locally stored on the network, what happens? It shows in performance between all the computers, but what if everyone on the network is trying to access non-local files across the internet? Everyone still struggles with the network. So what’s the logical solution here? Upgrade throughput, make more bandwidth so more people can access files and web services without clogging the network. This is the same idea as mobile carriers, we’re all terminals in an “office” sharing a single network connection of sorts. When you run out of network you upgrade. Office buildings don’t start cutting people’s internet usage or completely cutting them off after a certain point, do they?

    • 213ninja

      you’re an idiot.

    • Ryan

      You can actually make this even more simple.

      I have unlimited data. Say I use 1000 gigs with only my mobile phone, no tethering. You then have absolutely no argument.

      So essentially your issue can only be with illegal tethering and such.

  • StankyChikin

    People complaining that T-Mo is throttling them for using a prohibited protocol should feel lucky that they aren’t just kicking you off the network totally. You are violating their terms of service for crying out loud. Sounds to me like T-Mobile is being generous :)

    • Aaron C

      Just another example of how T-Mobile > Verizon. Treating their customers like people first. This “attack” is completely reasonable and is more than some folks should get.

  • mcdonsco

    For those in this thread that have vzw unlimited data accounts and use it as your home internet connection; when verizon finally kills off all of OUR accounts and forces us to leave vzw or switch to a share plan:

    It will be 100% YOUR FAULT.

    You’ll increase ALL of OUR MOBILE bills by $70+/month or more because YOU were too damn cheap to pay $30/month for a HOME internet connection.

    Thanks…aholes.

    • nerdydesi

      Oh hush, don’t you think it would be far easier for Verizon to just terminate those hogs instead of making system-wide, sweeping changes across all their departments, their internal systems, etc. whenever they have to create or revise their plans?

      The only reason they would do it is to increase their profits, not because of a select few abusers.

      Any carrier who gets rid of unlimited data is not doing it because of a few people spoiling it for everyone else as you may think.

      • mcdonsco

        What planet do you live on? Verizon has been trying to get us to ditch UD for quite a while and they ZERO OBLIGATION to continue to let us remain on them. Toss on these aholes using hundreds of gigs per month and that is ALL THE EXCUSE THEY NEED to eliminate UD all together.

        • Ryan

          Zero obligation???! You mean, besides the legally binding contract that I continue to opt into… Right? Yes, besides that there is absolutely nothing. Lol wow. They used wanting people to switch to a more lucrative data plan as an excuse to throttle. Jesus pull your head out of your ass. It’s funny that you call people who think logically instead of emotionally, idiots.

          • flosserelli

            That contract you signed is only valid until VZW decides to change the terms of service. VZW can pull the plug on unlimited data at any time. All they must do is notify you of the change and allow you to break the contract without ETF.

          • Ryan

            Fair enough. But while I’m in that contract, I should be able to use it how I please again, within terms and conditions and the law.

          • hoosiercub88

            People can’t see that side of it, they refuse to see why VZW is actually doing this, and that it has nothing to do with people that tether lots of data or stream large files all the time. They want more money, they are a business after all.. and they make lots, and lots of money.. what’s better than that? More money.

        • nerdydesi

          Name calling isn’t going to get ANYONE on your side poopyface. :)

    • monkeybutts

      When 5G comes around there won’t be throttling /s

    • Foosa Noble

      30$ a month for high speed internet? What galaxy r u living in?

    • hoosiercub88

      Please GTFO.. Verizon is doing this for money, this has nothing to do with people who tether.

      I have a VZW Unlimited account with a Moto X, and I don’t tether, but I do use 10-20 Gb a month on average.

      • mcdonsco

        I’m stunned by how many people here are clueless…of course its about the money…put the joint down dude, you’ve had enough.

    • 213ninja

      false. and you’re still an idiot. i’ve decided to run my house and the neighbors this week in your honor.

      • mcdonsco

        You’re an absolute moron.

        • 213ninja

          lol now i’m lighting up the whole block!! free data for everyone!!!!

          • mcdonsco

            Troll

          • 213ninja

            inbox me when your LTE GB’s run out. i’m pushing 500 and we ain’t halfway thru the month!!

          • mcdonsco

            Jesus Christ you’re dumb…LOL

          • 213ninja

            i’m not the one defending corporate carrier internet censorship practices and threatening paying customers with physical violence. you should be ashamed. anyone defending these ISP’s should be embarrassed….

          • mcdonsco

            Who in their RIGHT MIND would EVER interpret what I am saying as defending isp’s? When and where did I EVER SAY anything even remotely close to that?

          • 213ninja

            everyone reading your trash. i pay for what i pay for so i can do whatever i want with it. you on the other hand want people to bend over and take it from the carrier and sensor and throttle ourselves just to appease them. whether or not you intended to sound that way is probably up for debate, but that’s exactly how you come off when you spew this ignorance about those of us with unlimited plans using our unlimited plans however we choose is just pissing off verizon, and you hope they penalize us for it. if verizon put it in your face, you’d suck it off. again, you might not feel that way, but that’s how you sound in this entire thread. and the name calling and threats only amplify it.

            i recommend another approach to get your points accross.

          • mcdonsco

            Get off your high and mighty horse you idiot!

            You, and I, pay $30/month for a plan that now would cost anyone substantially more to get (depending on use, $60-$400+/month).

            Verizon DOES NOT HAVE TO LET US KEEP THE PLAN and instead of using it for what its intended use is, MOBILE, you, JACKASS, are raising the war flag with Verizon essentially DARING THEM to take it from NOT JUST YOU A$$HOLE, BUT THE REST OF US TOO!!!

            I’m going to end up with a $200+ / month MOBILE bill because A$$HOLES like you were too cheap to pay for a home internet connection.

            GET A LIFE YOU DICK.

          • 213ninja

            I have concluded you are either a punk brat selfish kid, or one seriously ignorant twat with socialist tendencies…neither of which I have time for. I regret wasting any effort at all trying to help you out.

            Keep on sucking that corporate dong.

            Oh, and I pay a premium for 100/25 home internet service and I average about 15gigs of LTE…not that any of that should or does matter.

          • mcdonsco

            I’m done with you you arrogant selfish petty little prick.

          • mcdonsco

            I’m done with you, you selfish arrogant inconsiderate self absorbed childish little prick.

          • mcdonsco

            Let me try to put this as simply as possible.

            You and I both pay $30/month for a plan that no longer is offered to any new users, and depending on use, an equivilant currently available plan could cost HUNDREDS A MONTH.

            And while Verizon is trying to do everything they can to get users off of these now obsolete plans including now throttling us, you, in your infinite wisdom, are waving the war flag DARING Verizon to kill the plans off…which for you, would cost you all of $30-$50/month to get home internet (which you should have done in the first place) and users like me (you know, the majority of the remaining UD users that use it for MOBILE USE), not waving the war flag, not using our MOBILE DATA PLANS AS OUR PRIMARY HOME INTERNET) will get stuck with $100+-$300+ month mobile bills.

            THANKS TO YOU. HENCE, GENIUS. YOU DO NOT MAKE ME HAPPY.

          • mcdonsco

            Jesus Christ you’re dumb…move along 85.

          • mcdonsco

            Inbox you? Wow…now move along 85

  • pyro74boy .

    This won’t effect me when I’m on T-Mobile because I don’t use P2P. The only time I used it was when Verizon had it for free for a short time when they where still offering unlimited data. Those where the good old days on Verizon wireless.

  • me?imnotadumbdumb

    if you’re torrenting and not using a vpn, you are a dumb dumb.

    • monkeybutts

      plenty of cheap services too, some will even take gift cards you don’t want as a payment for complete anonymity

  • StankyChikin

    Verizon has never guaranteed bandwidth speeds nor has any other carrier for that matter. I have no issue with what Verizon is doing other than the fact that they only throttle those using 4.7GB off contract and not those using 4.7GB on contract. While Verizon is under no obligation to provide anything to those off contract, there is a morality issue here. If you are going to allow those off contract to use your service, they should be treated no differently than those on contract. If 4.7GB is your threshold, then it should be the threshold for those on and off contract. T-Mobile, on the other hand, isn’t throttling those that are hitting a threshold, they are throttling those who are using a protocol that is known to drag networks to their knees. There is a big difference between downloading via bittorrent at 1Mbps with 100 connections and downloading a file or streaming content at 1Mbps with a single connection. My guess is that the more users T-Mobile gets on its network, they will also have to implement measures, such as Verizon has done, to keep their network working somewhat smoothly. Until then, P2P is specifically prohibited in T-Mobiles TOS and they have every right to keep it off of their network. If you don’t like it, then go somewhere else.

  • Eric

    I really don’t understand why people are having such a hard time comparing what Verizon is doing and T-mo is doing. When I reach 4.7gb I get throttled if I’m on a congested tower. Which tower is congested? No answer provided, pretty arbitrary it would seem. When I’m off that tower then I’m back to normal, but Verizon will not tell me which tower, in an urban area it could be all towers. On top of all that if I just bought 10gb of data from Verizon and used more than 4.7gb nothing happens. Is the BS not clear? T-mo on the other hand is specifically targeting unlimited users doing p2p/torrenting. On top of that when they find out they contact you first and ask you to not. You certainly don’t get that courtesy on Verizon.

    I’m a Verizon unlimited customer who buys phones off contract and use about 6gb/month in the LA area, mostly streaming music and the occasional netlflix. So I will probably get throttled when I’m on a supposed busy tower. If I were on T-mo, nothing happens to me. How is this not more clear to people?

    • guest

      Tethering on TMO is not unlimited. They’re just saying P2P because it’s an easier pill to swallow, but in reality they’re going after ALL those users abusing tethering. As more and more people sign up for TMO, expect changes to their unlimited data plans. You may get unlimited data, but their bandwidth is certainly not unlimited.

  • Michael Ludden

    “T-Mobile would really like people to just use their data properly” – my unlimited data to use as I like… what is “properly?” This seems like thought police stuff and I’m not a fan. what if I torrent legitimate items? Why is torrenting/P2P data usage “improper” and why is it T Mobile’s business what sites or what stuff I download?

    • StankyChikin

      Read up on how bittorrent works and you will see why carriers and internet providers alike hate its use on their networks. If you already know how bittorrent works, then you shouldn’t even be asking this question.

      • Michael Ludden

        Yes I would, because my question wasn’t “why don’t carriers want me to use data the way that they want,” it was “why is it the carrier’s business how I use data that is supposedly ‘unlimited'”

        • bkosh84

          Unlimited doesn’t mean “Use it anyway you want”.. Unlimited means.. “I can use an unlimited amounts of data”

          The two things are completely different from each other.

          • Michael Ludden

            Isn’t telling people how they can and can’t use their “unlimited” data… limiting it? Not only that, but this is a fundamental question about the openness of the internet – whether or not carriers have the right to tell us which sites/services we can/can’t access and which companies get priority access to customers over others. I like what t mobile has been doing lately, but not this. This is scary.

          • flosserelli

            Using P2P apps is a violation of T-Mobile Terms of Service, period. You agreed to this when you signed the paperwork. If you don’t like T-Mobile telling you what apps you can and can’t use on their network, that’s fine. Go to another carrier.

          • Michael Ludden

            But, again, the question is should T Mobile, or any carrier or internet service provider, be able to tell users of the internet which sites, apps and services they use the data they purchased for, and prioritize service to one over another? Doesn’t that hamper innovation for small companies and limit user choice for customers, and doesn’t it undermine the very idea of the internet in the first place? Seriously, is that not scary to anyone else or am I being trolled by T Mobile employees?

          • flosserelli

            You don’t get it, do you?
            It’s T-Mobile’s network, they can decide whatever the hell they want, whenever they want. If you don’t like what they offer or don’t feel like abiding by their rules, then don’t be their customer. It’s pretty simple.

            And no, I am not a T-Mobile employee. But I wholeheartedly support their right and decision to go after people that violate the Terms of Service.

          • Michael Ludden

            Yeah… you need to look up “net neutrality.” Might change your perspective a bit. Also if T Mobile blocked access to this site for customers because they deemed comments or news articles “improper” (IE, they didn’t like negative coverage), would you be ok with that?

          • sturmen

            I support Net Neutrality, but when you agree to do something (especially in a legally binding contract), everything else comes second.

          • Michael Ludden

            But what is legal to compel customers to do/not do in a ToS? Would you be okay if instead of “p2p” their provision was against “overuse” of DroidLife, or Facebook? It’s a slippery slope and I don’t think it should be legal. The technology behind bitorrent is amazing and should be the future of the internet, but not if T Mobile and other carriers get their way.

          • sturmen

            In a free market (monopolies are not free markets, oligopolies may qualify) they should be able to do whatever they want since you can just reject the terms they offer and switch to a provider with more agreeable terms. No one is forcing you to sign that contract. You were presented with terms and you accepted them. The government should step in for things like water, electricity, even cable since consumers have no choice. Cell phones providers are close but I personally don’t think they’re anticompetitive enough for the government to step in yet.

            And regarding BitTorrent specifically, because of how it works it just engulfs bandwidth in both directions. Without getting into specifics of settlement-free agreements between Tier 1 network operators, suffice to say that peer-to-peer networking is not exactly what the infrastructure is built for, doubly so for the wireless infrastructure.

          • flosserelli

            I am very familiar with the concept of net neutrality. This has nothing to do with that, and everything to do with the fact that P2P users are violating specific Terms of Service.

            I am not condemning P2P apps or users, but using P2P on T-Mobile is flagrant violation of TOS. If you want to do P2P over a cell network, that’s fine, go knock yourself out. But do it on a carrier that permits it. And if you can’t find one, go build a cell network yourself.

          • Michael Ludden

            What a carrier can compel it’s customers to do or not do with their data, via Terms of Service or any other means (throttling, slowing particular services or speeding up/prioritizing others) actually has everything to do with net neutrality – see my above comment for an example.

          • flosserelli

            Before getting carried away with your “net neutrality” argument, I suggest you read up on what a contract entails. Carrier contracts are always written in the carrier’s favor, and they can change the terms of service at any time. If you don’t like the terms of service, you can go to another carrier.

          • Michael Ludden

            There is a limit to what any contract can legally compel it’s signees to do. My point is that when a contract infringes upon clear net neutrality issues it should not have to be honored and it should be illegal to enforce it. The problem is that net neutrality is still being battled out in court with powerful players, like every carrier and service provider lobbying against real net neutrality protecting the openness of the internet

          • flosserelli

            Your first sentence tells me you have no idea what a contract can or can’t do. A contract can bind users to anything the seller/service provider desires. If the service provider wants you to use your phone only on the 1st and 3rd Thursday of each month, and you must wear a clown suit and ride a unicycle while doing it, then you must do so if that is in the terms of service. It doesn’t matter what you think is reasonable or appropriate. If it’s in the terms of service and you don’t conform to those terms of service, the provider has every right to limit or withhold service. End of story.

          • Aaron C

            Network providers have been using QoS forever. Does that mean they’re violating Net Neutrality? Should all packets be treated the same? They aren’t now, for the benefit of all users on the shared network.

          • ultravisitor

            Does not matter. If you don’t like it, you shouldn’t have agreed to the TOS.

          • Michael Ludden

            Does matter: ToS can say whatever it wants “must never ride a unicorn” etc., but what is legal to compel customers to do or not to do is another thing.

          • Aaron C

            TOS. TOS. TOS. That’s all that’s applicable here.

          • 213ninja

            i’m picking up what you’re putting down. i’m more concerned about what’s right and wrong than what the rules/laws are…..people whining about terms of service just sound like little kids tattling on each other.

          • StankyChikin

            They aren’t telling you how you can use it.. They are telling you how fast you can consume it… They guarantee you that you will get up to 4G LTE speeds. If you are using a prohibited protocol that is hindering the performance of its network, then they have every right to throttle you until you use the network as intended.

  • SmokeNMirrors

    How very “Carrier” of them.

  • StankyChikin
  • Ryan Chapman

    I hope they do it. I pay money to have fast Internet speeds and I use them as they were intended. If you want to be cheap and use it for p2p which is typically involved with illegal file sharing then I don’t feel sorry for you getting kicked.

    • skinja

      thats what people used to say about VCRs

      • Ryan Chapman

        People use to say they pay full price for fast running Internet and people abusing vcr’s are slowing it down? Makes total sense

  • GPier

    Good thing I just stream a crap ton of Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Instant! I still use like 50-60 GB a month. Which also includes my “Tethering”.

    • guest

      Tethering on TMO is not unlimited. They’re just saying P2P because it’s an easier pill to swallow, but in reality they’re going after ALL those users abusing tethering.

      • GPier

        That’s what I’m saying. I have unlimited tethering. Comes with a rooted and ROM’ed G2!

  • http://twitter.com/geoff5093 Geoff Johnson

    And here we go with people still praising T-Mobile for throttling. Looking at tweets from their company, it’s not just P2P, it’s anyone who is mis-using their plan that causes performance problems for others, i.e exactly what Verizon is doing.

    • butThanksThough

      It is probably fine, most T-Mobile customers can’t find enough signal to download anything anyway.

      • StankyChikin

        Nice try ;)

    • trixnkix637

      Problem with your analogy is Verizon is doing it only to of customers while ignoring tiered customers who are doing the same thing. What you meant to say is T-Mobile is doing what Verizon SHOULD be doing.

  • J2886M

    Whatever. I’ll use my slim port and netflix. I may or may not download a movie once in a while. But never anything over 1.5gb nor do I seed them over the network. I know plenty of friends who use well over 40gigs without doing and torrents. Simply streaming music at work and using Netflix Hulu etc. I’m interested to see how this runs its course

    • Michael Shorey

      same here.

  • Michael Shorey

    no where is it indicated what the threshold is.

  • http://infotainmentempire.blogspot.com Rob

    If you are using a VPN can they still determine that you are torrenting in ways that do not involve assumptions?

    • Raven

      They more than likely could with deep packet inspection. They definitely could with mere proxies. With a fully encrypted SSH tunnel or some other form of encrypted VPN it would be harder. It all depends on how much hardware they are throwing at the problem.

  • droidftw

    This is infinitely worse than what Verizon did. Verizon is throttling you for a short period of time when the tower you happen to be on is overloaded. T-Mobile is throttling you for an entire billing cycle.

    • Jon Parker

      Have to disagree. Verizon is throttling after ANY data usage that eclipses the 4.7GB threshold with no regard to how the data is being drawn. T-Mobile is specifically focused on activity that is illegal as a means to cut down on the effects irresponsible users have on others. Verizon = no one has recess until the guilty party comes forward. T-Mobile = due diligence to find the root of the problem and offer decent options to rectify.

      • guest

        and tethering outside of T-Mobile’s Terms and Conditions (T&C). This results in a negative data network experience for T-Mobile customers

        Nothing about illegal tethering there.. just tethering in general.

      • http://twitter.com/geoff5093 Geoff Johnson

        Wow… You are wrong. Verizon said they will throttle unlimited data users who are in the top 5% (where someone came up with 4.7GB), ONLY if you are on a congested tower. You will not be throttled right at 4.7GB for the rest of the month, many will hopefully not even be effected by the throttling. On Verizon, I can use a P2P program at 4AM since hardly anyone will be utilizing that tower.

        • flosserelli

          If you are in a highly populated area, then your tower(s) will probably always be “congested”, so you will effectively be throttled all the time.

        • Jon Parker

          “Where someone came up with 4.7GB”. Hey bro, you ever read droid-life? Verizon states that the top 5% are those that consume over 4.7GB monthly. http://www.droid-life.com/2014/08/04/verizon-fcc-throttling-unlimited-data/

          • http://twitter.com/geoff5093 Geoff Johnson

            In August of 2014 sure, but in August of 2015 who knows what the top 5% will be.

        • Aaron C

          “hardly anyone will be utilizing that tower.” <– as far as you know. What if Verizon still classifies it as a "congested tower?" You have no way of knowing, do you? What if you live in Manhattan and there are 2000 people within two square blocks also running torrenting apps?

      • sirmeili

        Just a note. P2P and/or bittorrenting are not necessarily illegal activities. There are some very legitimate reasons to use this technology. Just because some people use the technology for potentially illegal activities, doesn’t make the technology illegal. It’s like saying because someone used a car to kill someone that all cars are an illegal method of transportation.

        In this case though, use of that technology is against their TOS, but that still does not make it illegal one bit.

        • Jon Parker

          You’re right and I should have qualified my statement about “illegal activities”. I’m operating under the mindset that if the lion share of your P2P activity is not in breach of copyright law, you’re also not using your phone as the means to render the desired media. But you’re totally right, P2P is not inherently illegal. People who would qualify as “data hogs” and are also using P2P via smart phones are not, by and large, making sure that all they are downloading is acquired legally.

    • Defenestratus

      …Because you’re breaking the terms upon which that unlimited data service is being provided. You can’t break the rules then after the fact complain that its unfair. The language in the ToS is clear as day.

      • http://twitter.com/geoff5093 Geoff Johnson

        Where in the ToS does it say you can’t use legal P2P applications?

        • Ihavenewnike

          To be fair it says using device as a modem to tether or whatever is not permitted.

          • flosserelli

            Actually it says “You agree not to misuse the Service or Device, including but not limited to…using the Service in connection with server devices or host computer applications, including continuous Web camera posts or broadcasts, automatic data feeds, automated machine-to-machine connections or peer-to-peer (P2P) file-sharing applications….”

        • StankyChikin
          • sturmen

            Exactly. Subsection (g) specifically addresses P2P applications as a whole, regardless of whether the legality of the content.

      • David Mann

        Most ToS include broad “outs” for the wireless carrier that allow them to throttle service for any reason. I do not have access to the VZW Unlimited Data contract ToS but I have a feeling it includes such provisions. Can anyone look into this for verification?

    • Ryan Dombroski

      I have a feeling that if you are unlimited on Verizon every tower will magically become congested/overloaded – For instance where I live we have a few towers and they are under constant strain according to Verizon – So for me I would be throttled “permanently” and the person I talked to at Verizon said the same thing

      • flosserelli

        VZW people don’t seem to get that. Verizon’s terminology is so nebulous that they can claim “network congestion” on any number of towers, at any time…with no need or compulsion to prove otherwise. This is particularly bad news for VZW customers in highly populated areas, because their towers will always be “congested”.

    • Aaron C

      At least they won’t throttle you for viewing Netflix, YouTube or even listening to music. Only when you violate TOS that you agreed to when you signed the contract. I don’t get what the fuss is about. And the policy is clear. Do you know what constitutes a “congested” tower? Could be every tower in Manhattan for all we know. I love nebulous policies like that, don’t you?

  • MichaelFranz

    best….picture…ever

  • Jon

    So there are limits in data usage on an unlimited data plan?

    • tron192

      On T-Mobile. Never been throttled on Sprint. And I used 96 GB in three days. Never was throttled. Why. Cause when Sprint says unlimited. They mean unlimited.

      • Cael

        Sprints speeds are already slow. What would they do throttle you to 1G?

      • monkeybutts

        I’ve heard people get closer to 200 GB per billing cycle and Sprint starts sending out messages threatening to cancel service.

      • Jared Denman

        How the heck did u use 96GB with Internet that slow?!

        • Justin W

          If he was using it 24 hrs a day for those 3 days, it’d come out to 2.96 mbps, which seems high for sprint.. Something smells fishy…

      • lolSprint

        Sprint services like 1000 people tops, they can afford it

        • Aaron C

          Hahaha

    • https://twitter.com/paladaxar Paladaxar

      The only thing that has absolutely no limits is God’s love :)

  • sturmen

    I have no sympathy for those users. I think it’s common courtesy to not max out your connection 24/7 with illegal filesharing. I fully support unlimited data, but the fact is that the bandwidth isn’t ACTUALLY unlimited on T-Mobile end, so we have the tragedy of the commons.

    • zephiK

      Yeah people are reading the article wrong thinking that TMobile is targeting people who use high amounts of data. This is targeted towards people doing illegal activities (P2P/torrenting) on TMo network.

      • droidftw

        P2P/Torrenting is not illegal. Oh and on Verizon, unless you are on a shared data plan, tethering is 100% illegal and yet virtually everyone complaining about the new rules is tethering (no one uses 300GB/month without tethering).

        • MichaelFranz

          he isnt saying that P2P/Torrenting is illegal. Just the activites done by using them can be.

          • butThanksThough

            nope, the P2P/torrenting is attached to “illegal activities”. This is what people indoctrinated by hollywood actually believe.

        • sturmen

          Is tethering against a law passed by the US Congress? No. Is it against the binding legal agreement that YOU signed when you agreed to the service? Yes.

          • droidftw

            The Library of Congress ruled a year or so back (you can find the article on Droid-life somewhere) that wireless carriers are required to allow users to tether if they are paying per gigabyte. Violating a binding legal agreement is illegal.

          • sturmen

            That’s all fine and good, but the users in question here are abusing their unlimited (not-per-gigabyte) plan and “clogging up the tubes” for other customers.

          • droidftw

            Exact same thing on Verizon.

          • Ian

            The LoC ruled about locked devices not tethering.

          • droidftw

            Maybe it was the FCC. I can’t remember exactly, like I said, it was a while ago.

          • Ian

            I’m allowed to tether based on the FCC Block C stipulations that Verizon agreed to that say end users can use their data and any apps however they like. Verizon will tell you this does not apply to Unlimited users but the regulations apply to a frequency spectrum that when my phone utilizes the spectrum the conditions apply.

        • Justtyn Hutcheson

          It’s plenty possible to surpass 300GB /mo without touching P2P/torrent. That’s 5 hours of HD video (5 Mbps) per day. Add in social networking, photo/video sharing/uploading, HQ music streaming, etc. and that just makes it easier.

          • Lunkman

            Anyone watching 5hrs of HD video per day on a mobile device either needs a life or a better job.

          • flosserelli

            Or at least a girlfriend.

          • allansm

            Anyone who reaches 300gb in one month has absolutely no life.

        • DanSan

          Not unless you pay for the $30/month tethering plan which a lot of people do.

        • LSULaw2009

          You do not have to be on a shared plan for Verizon to have legal tethering. I pay $30 a month for unlimited data and $30 a month for unlimited tethering (before corporate discount).

        • zephiK

          Illegal activities using P2P/torrenting. There are legal uses for P2P/torrenting, indeed but why would someone be seeding nonstop a Linux distro on TMobile? This is meant to punish those who use their network against their terms and conditions. Its totally different.

        • flosserelli

          P2P/torrenting in an of itself is not illegal, but most people use the service for illegal purposes.
          I fully support T-Mobile’s decision to drop the banhammer on people using P2P on the cell network. If you want to do that, that’s fine…but do it on a Wi-Fi network. There is a time & place for everything. Don’t hog cell network bandwidth torrenting warez and porn.

  • Neil Fujiwara

    This is within reason and if it is a violation of ToS T Mo has every right to do it. This make sense rather than Verizon specifically targeting unlimited.

    • Mike Aurin

      Yeah…shame on Verizon for targeting a plan that they specifically told the world they got rid of and people had to figure out loop holes to exploit keeping the plan that doesn’t exist….

      • Jon

        Clearly, the plan still “exists.” You can’t keep something that doesn’t exist. There is a difference between something not existing, and something not offered anymore. Unlimited is unlimited. They offered it, some kept it. If they weren’t going to keep unlimited data unlimited, they should have never offered unlimited data.

        • butThanksThough

          That isn’t how the world works. You can’t buy a brand new 1989 Toyota Camry. Things go away.

          • Ron Perlman’s Jaw

            No, but I can keep driving my 1989 Toyota Camry as long as I continue to paying for fuel, regular maintenance and insurance.

          • thelolotov

            Eventually you’ll reach a point where there’s no replacement parts for the ones wearing down, but yes, you have a point.

          • Jon

            Oh. You don’t know how to read. I didn’t say you buy a brand new car, or even a brand new unlimited plan. I just said in my above comment that it’s not offered anymore. Things go away when you get rid of them after they’re no longer offered. If they still exist, they’re still there. Look at Ron’s example. Maybe it’s easier for you to understand like that.

          • mcdonsco

            You also cant get a new unlimited data account either, but you can keep driving that 1989 camry for as long as you want.

        • Mike Aurin

          There are so many flaws in that logic of yours….flaws everywhere.

          • Jon

            Ok, continue.

      • Mike

        I love it. When Verizon does anything negative they get instant hate.

        T-Mobile on the other hand can’t do anything wrong. People are hilarious.

        • butThanksThough

          inb4 Bryan Mills makes up excuses for Tmobs.

        • http://twitter.com/geoff5093 Geoff Johnson

          Exactly! Verizon says they will throttle UL data users who abuse their network on congested towers, and instant hate. T-Mobile says they will also throttle UL users who abuse their plans, and they get praises.

          • Tim

            T-Mobile is targeting those who violate their Terms and Conditions. Verizon
            unlimited customers who use more than 4.7 GB are not necessarily violating
            anything

          • Mike

            Other than using a data plan that hasn’t existed for what, two years now?

            And basically other than buying a phone outright (Which I doubt most do) they are using loopholes in the system to keep their unlimited data.

          • Tim

            The plan certainly still exists, otherwise they wouldn’t allow people to keep it. Continuing to pay for this plan is not a violation of anything. And just because some use loopholes (which Verizon could have patched up if it wanted to) doesn’t mean all or even most do.

          • Mike

            One, the plan doesn’t exist. The contract you have with Verizon does. If the plan still existed it would be possible for Verizon employee’s to add it on your account.

            And Verizon is trying to patch those loopholes, I’m sure they didn’t anticipate people holding onto it like they have been.

          • cgalyon

            Verizon just added the plan back onto my account after it got removed in a botched phone switch. It took them a couple of days, but they did add it back (which I appreciate). The plan definitely exists, it’s just not a selectable option for customers.

          • Big EZ

            If it doesn’t exist then how do I have it? What you mean is that they no longer offer it, but it does still exist.

          • MrToTo83

            Here let me help you understand what they are saying about the plan not existing anymore tim. The Plan is not “offered” anymore, you don’t have to try and play word games. You know what they meant you just want to cause people to have headaches.

          • Tim

            Actually, I don’t want to give anyone a headache Mike was implying that Verizon unlimited data customers are somehow violating an agreement by continuing to use the unlimited service they pay for because it “doesn’t exist”. I am arguing that they are not violating anything (because they still allow people to keep the plan), while the customers T-Mobile is targeting are violating their Terms and Conditions, and that’s why T-Mobile’s move is justified and Verizon’s really isn’t. I’m simply arguing a point about how unlimited data is used and allowed, not trying to bicker over the semantics of whether or in what manner it ‘exists’. Next time, try to understand the argument first instead of accusing me of playing word games for the sole purpose of irritating others.

          • http://twitter.com/geoff5093 Geoff Johnson

            Verizon never said it will throttle at 4.7GB, you are just trying to make it sound worse than it really is. Verizon said they will throttle unlimited data users who are in the top 5%, if the tower is under heavy load. Once you are no longer on a congested tower, your speed goes back up. FYI, if you are on a congested tower, even without throttling your speeds will suck.

          • http://www.androidanthem.com/ BaldyPal

            Who’s to say Verizon wont treat every tower as a heavy tower? i’m expecting verizon to royally screw the unlimited users with this. i predict they will throttle 100% of the time because it’s easier then monitoring and checking if they are top 5% and unlimited and out of contract. too many variable. and when they throttle 100% their excuse will then be, “you were on a high demand tower. Yes, you look to always be on a tower that is in high demand. Here try our tier data and you wont be throttled.”

            just my soapbox version. just picked somewhere to drop the $0.02. nothing on you, bro.

          • mcdonsco

            Heres to hoping the tower YOUR HOME uses is always congested.

          • Ryan Dombroski

            T-Mobile is only doing it b/c people are violating certain “Terms”

            Verizon is doing it to get people of of unlimited and make them move to a different plan which = more money for them

          • flosserelli

            Verizon is throttling users that download more 4.7 GB/month via any means (filesharing, streaming, whatever).
            T-Mobile is throttling users that violate Terms of Service using P2P apps.

            Two totally different situations.

          • http://twitter.com/geoff5093 Geoff Johnson

            Believe what you will, but T-Mobile’s TOS don’t lie:

            To provide the majority of our customers with a good experience and minimize capacity issues and degradation in network performance, we may take certain steps with our network, including, but not limited to, temporarily reducing data throughput for a subset of customers who use a disproportionate amount of network resources.

          • flosserelli

            You obviously (and conveniently) missed the TOS section that specifically prohibits using P2P apps on their network.

          • http://twitter.com/geoff5093 Geoff Johnson

            No I saw that, but they also say they can limit you if you are using too much data, regardless of it’s source.

        • HarvesterX

          This is a completely different ballgame

        • Anthony Fallucco

          The difference is Verizon is only targeting unlimited users not shared data and they would throttle all their data. Tmobile is doing it in response to illegal peer to peer and bittorrent data.

      • Mark_Venture

        But according to their response to Tom Wheeler, they said they STILL HAVE the unlimited plan. (according to -> http://www.cnet.com/news/verizon-wireless-ceo-fires-back-at-fcc-over-throttling-brouhaha/ it says… “We still have the unlimited date plan,” he [Verizon Wireless CEO Daniel Mead] said. “We haven’t taken it away. But we don’t subsidize those handsets if customers want to stay on those plans. Most customers have moved to our other plans.”)

      • tdurden64111

        Nice try, Verizon.

      • mcdonsco

        Theres no “loophole” to keeping the plan. We pay full retail for our phones now so we dont have to sign a new contract on a new plan…thats not a loophole, thats the way its always been with every carrier.

        Maybe you’re just butt hurt cause you wanted to save some money on a phone once and gave yours up?

    • Ihavenewnike

      I don’t know. If you pay for Hotspot are you safe? I do on Verizon and use over 400 GB of data per month.

      • Amanda M

        You’re so cool!

        Get a life, loser.

        • Ihavenewnike

          Yes ma’am. Thank You for your direction and support.

          • thelolotov

            Don’t listen to them. Verizon is the problem, we are the victims.

          • Josh

            This article is about T-Mobile, not Verizon. Why is it that any article that appears to criticize T-Mobile, albeit it very loosely, brings out the anti-Verizon crowd? When T-Mobile says they offer unlimited, as they have for years, they’ve throttled those users. Now, they are picking unlimited data users, seemingly at random and those that could be legitimately using p2p or torrent sites, and slowing them down for “abusing” their data; how can any of their customers even challenge the company or the policy?

          • Uncle Joe

            Someone had to do it since your parents were unable.

        • tdurden64111

          Your a looser!

        • http://twitter.com/geoff5093 Geoff Johnson

          I use 500-750GB a month at home, what’s your point?

          • MistaButters

            through a Verizon unlimited plan?

          • Geoff Mylawn

            That must be a lot of porn. Dude, there’s a life outside your basement.

          • http://twitter.com/geoff5093 Geoff Johnson

            I love how quick you are to jump to conclusions. No, that’s not what I use it for, I have a NAS at my home and backup my data weekly offsite to keep my photography and video work safe in the event of damage to my home.

          • mcdonsco

            So you use a data connection 100% intended for MOBILE USE to save yourself $30/month that is a freaking TAX WRITE OFF?

            You’re a dick.

          • http://twitter.com/geoff5093 Geoff Johnson

            No, I have Comcast (hint, I said I use that much at home). I’m just saying it’s easy to use a lot of data when you are using something for home use.

          • mcdonsco

            Okay…thank you for not being a jackass then :-)

          • http://twitter.com/geoff5093 Geoff Johnson

            And FYI, you really shouldn’t jump to conclusions and insults.

          • Ian

            He should probably just stop commenting altogether, because of personal attacks and insults like the ones he is spewing Disqus is going to take away all commenting and it will be 100% his fault! /s

          • Joshua Pugh

            Hey…..dont knock the latest and greatest

          • mcdonsco

            Stop being a low life cheap ass and get a home internet connection…i cant stand people like you.

            When verizon eventually kills off all unlimited data plans IT WILL BE YOUR FAULT and the rest of us using it as intended will have to pay the price.

            Thanks to YOU we will go from our $70-$120/month plans to $200+/month or more because your dumb ass was too cheap to pay for a $30/HOME internet connection.

            YOU are ruining it for everyone.

            Ahole.

          • Iamjackspost

            That’s exactly what verizon wants you to think, sheep. They spread this myth about data being used up, and gullible fools like you fan the flames. IT’S ABOUT THE MONEY, DUMMY!

          • mcdonsco

            No shlt sherlock! And they would get a hell of a lot more of it if we were forced onto share plans because we need reliable data coverage and thus CANNOT just go to another carrier.

            How can you be SO INCREDIBLY STUPID to think its crazy talk that they would eliminate these plans all together? They’ve been doing everything they can up to this point to get us to willingly ditch UD, at some point they ARE going to eliminate it all together; its in their best interest to do it.

          • Iamjackspost

            Not sure what you’re angry at now. I’m replying to you saying heavy users are the reason carriers are taking away UD plans. If UD is significantly affecting the network, they would axe the plans (they can, it’s in the fine print). But they don’t, because they still want our money. Data is not a natural resource that can run out. Bandwidth is limited, but that has to do with volume of users at any time, not amount of data. So pipe down and stop believing everything the rich people tell you.

          • mcdonsco

            Absolutely amazed by the lack of intelligence in this thread.

          • Iamjackspost

            Feel free to contibute some then. Or you can go back to yelling, name-calling, and wishing harm on others.

          • Big EZ

            Why do you assume he is doing this on his Verizon plan and not home Internet? I think he was just pointing out that telling the guy to get a life because of his data usage is stupid because they have no idea how someone is using the data. Verizon was selling people hotspot, and telling them that it could replace their home Internet. So why would it be wrong of someone to use it the way they were told they should? I have a friend who is not into tech at all, but had hotspot just because the sales said it would be great for them since all they use it for is Netflix. They were using tons of data because they were doing exactly what the salesman said it was for.

          • http://twitter.com/geoff5093 Geoff Johnson

            Exactly. I use Comcast for home, and Verizon for mobile (where I only use 5-10GB per month)

          • http://twitter.com/geoff5093 Geoff Johnson

            Again, saying that I am ruining it for everyone, calling me an ahole, and wishing someone would punch me in the face is pretty harsh considering you just misunderstood what I said. I use 500GB+ on Comcast, and 5-10GB on Verizon (no tethering).

          • mcdonsco

            You dont see from your own post how you made it sound like you were using it as your primary? Sure, you didnt explicitly state it, but you very syrongly implied it.

          • http://twitter.com/geoff5093 Geoff Johnson

            I should have been specific, but I said I use that much data at home. I can see how you’d be confused.

          • mcdonsco

            Thank you!

          • thelolotov

            un·lim·it·ed
            ˌənˈlimitid/
            adjective
            not limited or restricted in terms of number, quantity, or extent.

          • mcdonsco

            mo·bile
            adjective
            ˈmōbəl,-ˌbīl/
            1.
            able to move or be moved freely or easily.
            “he has a major weight problem and is not very mobile”
            synonyms: able to move (around), moving, walking; More
            antonyms: motionless
            (of the face or its features) indicating feelings with fluid and expressive movements.
            “her mobile features working overtime to register shock and disapproval”
            (of a store, library, or other service) accommodated in a vehicle so as to travel around and serve various places.
            synonyms: traveling, transportable, portable, movable; More
            antonyms: stationary
            (of a military or police unit) equipped and prepared to move quickly to any place it is needed.
            “mobile army combat units”
            2.
            of or relating to cellular phones, handheld computers, and similar technology.
            “the next generation of mobile networks”
            3.
            able or willing to move easily or freely between occupations, places of residence, or social classes.
            “an increasingly mobile and polarized society”
            synonyms: adaptable, flexible, versatile, adjustable More
            antonyms: static
            noun
            noun: mobile; plural noun: mobiles
            ˈmōˌbēl/
            1.
            a decorative structure that is suspended so as to turn freely in the air.

          • Ian

            Just stop commenting altogether, because of the personal attacks and insults like the ones you are spewing Disqus is going to take away all commenting and it will be 100% your fault! /s

          • mcdonsco

            :-P

            …Yes, I have a temper.

          • 213ninja

            false.

          • Joshua Pugh

            Who got 30 dollar internet…i have yet to see that

          • Joshua Pugh

            Naw frontier aint in my city and comcast after those 12 month its 70 a month

          • mcdonsco

            Comcast and frontier both do (and frontier is FiOS).

          • nimbyist

            See, when mobile data first came out, the carriers adopted the home internet usage method, i.e unlimited. Right now, you don’t pay by the GB for home internet, and guess what? their infrastructure can handle it! My worry is that this whole pricing model carriers are forcing onto customers becomes the norm and pretty soon, ISP’s will start touting ‘savings’ to people who use less gigs a month, to move away from speed based tiers (e.g. 25mbps) to usage based, and you know that it won’t be equitable. People who only use email will see $5 savings, and people who use netflix and game will see a $25 increase on their bills. You agreeing with Verizon’s business model is setting a precedent for other corporations to do the same.

          • Josh

            The point is….USE MORE DATA!!!! It IS unlimited, right? :)

      • monkeybutts

        All T-mobile plans come with Hotspot, this just attempts to block file sharing with p2p and excessive use bypassing the tether limits of 3 or 5 GB without paying more.

        I used my tethering once in a while, some stuff counts some stuff doesn’t all. Rarely go over 1 GB on my plan through tethering

      • mcdonsco

        Thanks Jackass. You’re one of the many reasons UD users on Verizon are about to be throttled.

        • thelolotov

          un·lim·it·ed
          ˌənˈlimitid/
          adjective
          not limited or restricted in terms of number, quantity, or extent.

          Funny, that IS the definition for unlimited, not “Actually not unlimited, but 5 GB”

          • Lucky Armpit

            Unlimited amount of data, yes, in terms of total data consumed. But total data consumed vs. bandwidth usage are two totally different things. It’s guys like that who abuse the unlimited data and is probably the reason why my 4G connection is so terrible.

            The other question is, what the hell is he doing that consumes 400+ GB of data/month? Do you do nothing but watch Netflix movies or watch YouTube videos?

          • thelolotov

            Somehow I don’t think my data usage is going to impact other people, here’s why:

            I used 200+ GB for the past two months. I did so, in the middle of nowhere, North Texas. It was the fastest connection possible, so I used it as my home connection at my fiancee’s house. Said house is in a community of primarily seniors, there were probably 20 other phones on the cell towers I was using, if that. How many do you think would be using 4G? If so, they’re probably using it for the same reason as me, because AT&T’s DSL is the best thing available there, and it sucks.

            So if I was inconveniencing anyone, which I wasn’t, because the bandwidth was always 20+ Mbps, they would have been at home. Furthermore, it was almost entirely at night/early morning.

            But all of this doesn’t matter, because if Verizon can’t afford to have the infrastructure to support their customers, they need to stop signing customers, and improve their infrastructure.

            If bandwidth/data was a finite resource, if this was actually a problem, if a few people like me actually *could* bring down the system, (which would just prove how shoddy it is) then don’t you think Verizon would just cut people off data entirely? No, they don’t say “Oh, you can only use this much data, we have to conserve bandwidth” or “You can have unlimited data at these off-peak times” no, instead, it’s “You can have as much data as you want, as long as you pay us more money.”

            See, if you have a tiered plan, and you go over your cap, do you get cut off or throttled? No. You get a lovely charge on your bill, and you can just keep going up. They’re claiming that unlimited users using more than 4.7 GB of data are problematic, and causing problems. Yet… they sell data plans up to 10 GB, and those people aren’t getting throttled. The only difference here is who’s paying more.

          • Josh

            I guarantee you that any of the carriers can find a way to link high data usage in low-populated areas as negatively impacting the overall network; Probably something along the lines of the “total” bandwidth available in a region being disproportionately used and they didn’t “plan” on supporting high use in lesser populated areas.

          • TC Infantino

            You are correct in that monthly data amounts and bandwidth are two seperate measurements. But, the reason that anyone experiences any degradation of their connection is entirely based off number of devices connected to that specific tower, or the condition of the equipment at the tower. The towers switching equipment treats all data the same, meaning if only two people are connected then their data gets boken into equal packets and sent at basically the same speeds. It doesn’t matter if one is browsing the internet, and the other is d/loading movies, both sets of data will be broken into equal bandwidth share and sent through. Plus, the equipment at each tower doesn’t care how much data you have used over the last month, the last day, or even a minute ago. It only cares about the data requests This Instant. So really it all comes down to VZW needing to upgrade their equipment if you are having issues.

        • Ian

          I like that you place no blame with Verizon and make no attempt to advocate for advancing of the mobile industry. The carriers have us going backwards and you’d rather resort to name calling and infighting.

          Pathetic.

          • mcdonsco

            Who in the hell said that? WOW.

        • velocipedes

          Since people seem to forget so easily, I’ll repeat: DATA IS NOT SCARCE. It’s asinine to be mad at someone for using lots of data when data is not scarce. Bandwidth is scarce, but data use and bandwidth use are not a perfect correlation. Someone can indeed use lots of data over the span of a month and yet still be relatively easy on bandwidth.

          So stop acting like someone is eating all the cake and left you none. That’s not how it actually works.

          Thanks, Verizon, for obfuscating reality.

          • mcdonsco

            And im sure verizon gives that a lot of consideration when evaluating their revenue streams.

          • Iamjackspost

            Thank you for speaking up with an intelligent response. People really need to know this. Look at all the upvotes these dumb responses get. Fight ignorance!

          • MicroNix

            And what do either of you REALLY know about Verizon or T-Mo’s networks?? That’s right. Zero.

          • Josh

            We should actually be thanking ATT, since they were the first to enact a throttling initiative based on data use.

          • Josh

            I don’t know, data seems to be getting hard to move around. Just ask Netflix users. Similar issue with people getting a stuttery experience with other continuous streaming services. Plus that’s on wired connections.

          • velocipedes

            Again, that’s due to scarcity of bandwidth, not to some imaginary scarcity of data.

          • mcdonsco

            Tell me…is Verizon billing people based on bandwidth? Nope. Are they throttling (or about to) based on bandwidth? Nope.

            While I understand, very well in fact, the point you’re trying to make, its a moot point because that is NOT how Verizon is playing the game here…if you want to ignore that and continue applauding those putting our UD accounts in jeopardy, be my guest…but it doesn’t make you right, it just makes you stubborn and stupid.

          • velocipedes

            You need to examine the definition of “moot.” You’re not using it correctly.

            Like I said, it’s not others who are putting your unlimited account in jeopardy. It’s Verizon.

            The reason Verizon is throttling people has NOTHING to do with data; it has to do with bandwidth. The method they use for monetizing their bandwidth is to charge for data. Examine that situation instead of accusing others of putting your unlimited account in jeopardy and then calling them names.

          • mcdonsco

            I understand bandwidth vs CB’s of data VERY WELL but apparently you do not (or refuse to?) understand that big red IS NOT USING BANDEIDTH AD THEIR ARGUMENT AGAINST UD ACCOUNTS they are using gb’s of data. Why is this so difficult for you to undertsand?

            You’re not going to win the bandwidth vs “data” points with Verizon, none of us will…what we can do is not GIVE THEM AMMUNITION BY USING MOBILE UD AS OUR HOME INTERNET RACKING UP “THE GIGS”…Its childish and stupid and its giving them all the ammunition they need to eventually (and very likely) kill off all UD accounts.

          • velocipedes

            That’s kind of the point. Verizon is deceiving you. Stop acting like I don’t understand the obvious.

            I don’t do business with Verizon anymore, so I really don’t care.

          • mcdonsco

            Got it, you’re a troll.

          • d-rock

            I’m going to tell you why your reality is obscured. You say that data is not scarce and using 400GB of data doesn’t mean you’re affecting the network. If EVERY user used 400GB of data every month, it would likely shut down any quality the Verizon network would have. 1 person, not so bad, Half a million, very bad.

            This is like saying it’s okay for someone to litter on the highway because there’s plenty of space on the earth. If everyone littered then we’d have pretty trashy living conditions.

            Now don’t get me wrong, Verizon is doing this all for the money. T-mobile is doing it for their company and their network quality.

            You saw what it was like for AT&T to get the iPhone. It KILLED their network. Everything was so slow and these phones probably weren’t using more than a couple GB/month at the time. And actually Verizon’s 3G network wasn’t bad at all until the iPhone launched on it too. So use your history to realize that data consumption directly correlates with network quality.

            No provider wants to end up in a situation like they had during the iPhone launches.

          • TylerCameron

            This is why I really think the best solution to everything is to have speed tiers. Like ISP’s.

          • Sundi

            Screw you- there tiers are bs. Maybe if they do it right. A 300GB limit with Comcast is ridiculous and really pisses me off- I really really hope that Google decides on Atlanta to be the next place to bring fiber

        • TC Infantino

          Uhm…No, you are completely incorrect. The one and only reason that VZW is planning to throttle Unlimited Data users is to get them to change plans to one of their tiered data plans (so they can charge more for the same usage). It has and will always be about money, and for anyone to think otherwise means that VZW has succeeded in fooling you into believing their lies. Congratulations, you are one of them.

          • mcdonsco

            Uhhh….Yea, they DO want to get UD users to switch to tiered plans…you’re right…not sure where the argument is here bubs.

        • Moron

          This is like saying Joggers use up all the air because they are breathing it in twice as much

      • C-Law

        You suck, so does Verizon, but you do too for this

        • thelolotov

          Make sure to criticize people for using their unlimited plan, yep, that’s fair.

      • Fattie McDoogles

        How do you use so much data on Verizon? Doesn’t that cost a fortune?

        • thelolotov

          Unlimited plans actually are unlimited.

        • Ihavenewnike

          I actually do a legitimate amount of file sharing across private servers for business. I use VZW because ATT is the only other available internet and I had a bad experience with them. Well also TWC, but they throttle the heck out of stuff. Cant even watch netflix with them.

    • http://twitter.com/geoff5093 Geoff Johnson

      T-Mobile is also only targeting unlimited data users..

      • Neil Fujiwara

        T Mobile is targeting those who torrent or P2P download. Verizon is planning to throttle those who are potentially using Verizon approved services such as Red Zone or even Fios TV. I don’t like throttling either way, but it makes more sense to target a practice rather than an arbitrary low data cap that many people who have tiered data can exceed.

        • http://twitter.com/geoff5093 Geoff Johnson

          Not really, Verizon is claiming they want to improve performance. If that’s true, it doesn’t matter if I’m using lots of data with a P2P transfer or streaming video, I’m still making the experience worse for others.

          • EFF VZW

            Or verizon could take their “record Profits” and “Zero taxes for 5 years” and reinforce their network more from the bare minimum that they have created. LTE towers cost 250K each, hell of an investment of 1 Billion would be to shore up their network.

        • T-Mo still sucks

          I thought phones were made to be Person 2 Person.

          Whit if the people are just tethering their phones to their Computer’s and do nothing but stream videos instead of having cable, like everyone does now under 30

          So Much for the Uh-Carrier

      • flosserelli

        This has nothing to do with targeting unlimited users, and everything to do with P2P users. They are not one and the same.

      • Stone Cold

        They are targeting heavy data users not unlimited. It clearly states those that are using p2p to violate the TOS. If you are unlimited and not in violation then your safe.

      • velocipedes

        All of T-mobile’s users have unlimited data.

        • http://twitter.com/geoff5093 Geoff Johnson

          They specify both the $70 and $80 truly unlimited plans.

          • velocipedes

            Those are the plans with unlimited 4G data. But all T-mobile data plans have unlimited data.

    • j

      It’s laid out extremely clearly in TMO’s TOS:
      Direct Copy and Paste:

      using your Device as a modem or tethering your Device to a personal computer or other hardware, are not permitted..

      To provide the majority of our customers with a good experience and minimize capacity issues and degradation in network performance, we may take certain steps with our network, including, but not limited to, temporarily reducing data throughput for a subset of customers who use a disproportionate amount of network resources.

      In addition, if your total usage exceeds 5GB (amount is subject to change without notice; please check T-Mobile’s T&Cs on http://www.T-Mobile.com/terms-conditions for updates), or the amount specified in your Data Plan, during a billing cycle, we may reduce your data speed for the remainder of that billing cycle. If you use your Data Plan in a manner that could interfere with other customers’ service, affect our ability to allocate network capacity among customers, or degrade service quality for other customers, we may suspend, terminate, or restrict your data sessions, or switch you to a more appropriate Data Plan.

      You signed it, now live with it.

      • j

        Additionally, the misuse clause contains:

        By activating or renewing Service with T-Mobile, you agree that you do so because you want Service from T-Mobile and not for any other purposes. You agree not to misuse the Service or Device, including but not limited to

        (g)
        using the Service in connection with server devices or host computer applications, including continuous Web camera posts or broadcasts, automatic data feeds, automated machine-to-machine connections or peer-to-peer (P2P) file-sharing applications that are broadcast to multiple servers or recipients, “bots” or similar routines that could disrupt net user groups or email use by others or other applications that denigrate network capacity or functionality

      • 101

        This is in Verizon’s TOS as well. But the circlejerk wagon loves to point out, “It’s my data, I’ll use it how I want.” because like hating on Samsung it’s the cool thing to hate Verzion now.

  • mike

    LOL. I want to go back to the VZW throttling thread and look at all the TMO folks who laughed, but will now say it’s no big deal.

    • zephiK

      This is targeted towards people who use unlimited to do P2P/Torrenting. Not for individuals who use high amounts of data legally.

      • butThanksThough

        P2P and torrents are certainly legal. Go to any linux distro website and see what their first choice in delivering the iso is.

        I’ll let you have 1 guess before you go on over to slackware/ubuntu/arch first…

        • MichaelFranz

          lets face it 90% of the torrent stuff used is for illegal acquisition of movies, games, software, music, etc. I dont shame T-Mo from doing it

        • zephiK

          I should have elaborated more. People who do P2P/torrenting on illegal trackers, but at the end of the day. I don’t get why people would be using their LTE network to seed Linux distros. Thats not the point of mobile internet. They are two different things. VZW is throttling overall usage whereas TMo is punishing those using it for illegal activities which more or less takes place on torrent/P2P. Yes there are legal uses for it. But every legal use comes illegal. Paper money, illegal goods and legal goods.

    • Defenestratus

      There’s a big difference between T-mo throttling people who are breaking the ToS and Verizon throttling people because they want to squeeze more money out of them.

      As an unlimited data customer on T-mo I 150% support this action.

    • Ryan Chapman

      Difference is I can use more than5 gigs on T-Mobile all I can’t do is steal music on it

      • mike

        Doesn’t matter what you’re doing, if you’re tethering you’ll be throttled after you reach their limit. Read their ToS.

        • Ryan Chapman

          Oh good so it’s even more clear then… So nobody has anyone to blame but themselves. Be happy they got to misuse it for as long as they did

  • Jon Parker

    Did T-Mobile just learn something constructive from Verizon’s recent dealings with data throttling and the FCC?

    • Ihavenewnike

      Wait, I just had a thought. How does Tmobile know you are using P2P sites or anything like that. I honestly didn’t know carriers could see browsing history. Good thing I don’t watch pron.

      • DanSan

        NSA

        • Ihavenewnike

          You sir have just opened my eyes.

      • Jared Denman

        It’s not rocket science. They are listening to the ports you have open.

      • Raven

        It has nothing to do with your browsing history. It is called deep packet inspection. They can easily see every URL that you visit from your device on an unencrypted connection, but even more so, they can detect the type of data packet, sometime even when encrypted. So, they may not be able to know what you are watching or torrenting, but unless you take extreme measures, they can probably tell that your device is receiving packets with P2P data inside of them.

        • Ihavenewnike

          But there is no way to encrypt on android is there. Using VPN on desktop is a given. What about on android.

          • Kane Desousa

            There’s VPN on Android..

          • Ihavenewnike

            For real. I’m going to have to look into this

          • DanSan

            T-Mobile doesn’t care you stream youporn all day.

          • tdurden64111

            Wish my girlfriend didn’t as well…

          • http://twitter.com/geoff5093 Geoff Johnson

            Yup, there’s a built in VPN client, but I prefer OpenVPN.

          • Anthony Fallucco

            Private Internet Access has an android app. Open VPN apps on android are the most secure with built in VPN support being second.

      • Daistaar

        They see the ports that traffic is going through. If you’re using port 21 for example, they know it’s FTP traffic. Port 80 is using a web browser and so on.

      • Anthony Fallucco

        All Internet service providers including cell phone providers can see everything. All the packets you send are viewable by them. I use a VPN so all my data is encrypted and not viewed by any Internet provider. I always protect myself from unconstitutional searches online this way. A VPN is very cheap and I use private Internet Access on any device of mine. 6.99 a month or 39.99 for the year and they have an android app. It encrypts all of your Internet traffic. It’s also extremely secure on public WiFi connections so I can do my banking and such from anywhere because snoopers can’t see the packets I’m transmitting.

        Because Internet providers cannot see what you are doing it speeds up Netflix and youtube considerably because they can’t purposefully congest your network traffic for those things.