Google: No 4.2 Support For Nexus S and XOOM, Keep Using Android 4.1.2

A couple of hours ago, as 4.2 hit AOSP, Google’s Jean-Baptiste Queru (JBQ) took to the Android Builders group and announced that there would be no official Android 4.2 support for either the Nexus S or Motorola XOOM. When asked to clarify on if that means it is officially over for the devices, he declined comment. So, we can take that as a, “Yes, that’s a wrap” or “Maybe in the future when we aren’t so busy.”

It may seem like a bummer, but both devices are starting to show their age and I think it’s best for Google to start focusing their efforts on newer devices. The XOOM has had one helluva ride and we salute you for it.

Via: Google

Cheers NAM!

Android 4.1.2 Factory Images for “yakju” Galaxy Nexus and “soju” Nexus S

This afternoon, Google posted Android 4.1.2 factory image files for the “yakju” Galaxy Nexus and the “soju” Nexus S. They previously released the same files for the “takju” Galaxy Nexus and the Nexus 7, so that about wraps up their world unlocked GSM lineup. All that’s left are a couple of Nexus S models and the device expected to receive the update months after everyone else, the Verizon Galaxy Nexus (“toro”).

On a side note, the first factory image for the Nexus Q (“tungsten”) has also been posted. It’s an Android 4.0.4 build IAN67K.

Via:  Google

NASA’s PhoneSat Program to Launch Android-Powered Mini Satellites into Space

With the hope of restoring low-cost space exploration, NASA is planning to launch mini satellites into space powered by Nexus One and Nexus S smartphones. The program, called “PhoneSat” aims to launch the “lowest-cost satellites ever flown into space,” which I’m guessing just wasn’t possible if they used an iPhone instead. Zing? Two prototype satellites exist as of now, one being version 1.0, powered by the Nexus One and other is version 2.0 powered by the Nexus S.  (more…)

Jelly Bean Factory Images Released for Nexus 7, Nexus S, and GSM Galaxy Nexus Variants

Jelly Bean factory images are now available from Google for a good portion of the Nexus lineup of devices. If you happen to own a Nexus 7, Nexus S (sojua or soju versions), or the Galaxy Nexus (yakju and takju versions), then we suggest downloading these files and keeping them in a safe place in case of future software troubles. Down the road, these could save you from a horrible custom ROM flashing fiasco and bring your device back from the dead. No love yet of course for the Verizon toro version, but hopefully we’ll be shown some love too in the future.  (more…)

WugFresh’s Root Tookit 1.5 Supports All Nexus Devices Including the Nexus 7

When your Nexus 7 arrives, you should be able to unlock its bootloader, root it, and have a custom recovery up in a matter of minutes. After all, it is a Nexus. But if doing things the manual way isn’t for you or you simply don’t have enough time to type “fastboot oem unlock,” then a root toolkit should be right up your alley. WugFresh built one a while back that continues to be updated with support for new Nexus devices, including the Nexus 7. Without having to worry about drivers and the Android SDK, you can use a root toolkit like this, press a couple of buttons, and be on your way.

Via:  Download | WugFresh

Cheers John, Shannon, and Mike!

Verizon Needs Google [Opinion]

 

Think back to January 5th, 2010. That was the date that the Nexus One was first announced and made available for purchase. I can vividly remember the announcement. I impatiently waited for someone to review the device, but the images I saw already confirmed my suspicions: this was going to be an incredible device. Even though it wasn’t on Verizon yet, I had plans to upgrade to it as soon as possible.

This vision of the Nexus One was a phone sold directly by Google to consumers. There was no store to try the device out. You went to google.com/phone to purchase the phone. If you had T-Mobile you could buy the phone unlocked for $529 or $179 on a new two year contract. Eventually a version of the Nexus One with AT&T bands was released in March. By April it was announced that the Nexus One would never be released on Verizon and that customers should buy the Droid Incredible instead. I was crushed, but I moved on (and eventually did get a Droid Incredible, which now sits on my desk running CM7).  (more…)

Mega-Gallery: Ice Cream Sandwich Walk-through from Nexus S Port

One of the first fully working Ice Cream Sandwich ports has been produced and made public to anyone with a Nexus S. Kellex and I just spent the last hour drooling, ooohing and awing over this thing on our very own devices – it’s super impressive. It’s not the Android 4.0 that you saw at the Hong Kong event and is instead the version we saw a few weeks prior running on none other than a Nexus S. It works, has almost all of the goodies you have been teased with, and will likely make the Nexus S our weekly driver for the next week or so until the Galaxy Nexus is released.

So what we have for you below then, is a massive gallery of how almost all of the new features in ICS will look. You will see the new launcher, widgets, Gmail, camera app, dialer, People app, gallery, keyboard, browser, swiping notifications, Google Talk account switching, etc. If you need a rehashing of all things Android 4.0, we hope this helps.   (more…)

Galaxy Nexus ICS vs. Nexus S ICS – So Many Differences

We are doing our best to forget about the fact that Ice Cream Sandwich and the Galaxy Nexus will not be unveiled next week at CTIA, and have instead found ourselves analyzing the hell out of the two ICS videos that have popped up in the last week. There are so many differences in them that we just had to point them out to everyone to get community opinions.

The first video we attached is from the Nexus S running ICS that was reportedly purchased on eBay.  It looks almost exactly as we had all pictured in our minds – Honeycomb turned tiny.  The second video is from this morning’s mega-leak featuring the G-Nex. It’s almost like the grown up or more polished version of ICS that we had actually hoped for.  One looks minimal yet sophisticated and buttery – the other looks like stock tablet Honeycomb, which is not necessarily a compliment.

So let’s dive into the differences that we easily spotted and then talk about them afterwards.   (more…)