History of Nexus Phone Pricing – Why the High Price for the Nexus 6?

You are standing in a carrier store, staring at a mystery phone on a shelf that sits next to the Galaxy Note 4 and LG G3. Like those phones, it has top tier specs, including a 6-inch QHD display, Snapdragon 805 processor, 13MP camera with optical image stabilization, premium metal build, and is made by Motorola. It looks gorgeous and feels amazing in hand, even for a big device. Those other phones cost anywhere from $599 to $825 without a contract (depending on the carrier), or between $199 and $299 with one. After toying with all three phones for a few minutes, you decide that the mystery Motorola device might be the phone for you. So how much are you willing to pay for it? What if I told you that it was $649 without a contract? Would you be offended by that?  (more…)

Waking From the Nexus Dream [Opinion]

nexus logo

Last week on the Droid Life Show I mentioned that I don’t think Nexus devices really matter anymore. With the Nexus 5’s release just around the corner, a lot of readers became very defensive of the Nexus program. Call me self-absorbed or too worried about what people think about me (I’m working on it), but I read through every comment on our site and YouTube regarding my statements. After reading through the comments and listening to our discussion on the show again I’ve decided to try to go into more detail about why I feel this way about the Nexus program. It’s not that I hate Android or Nexus phones, but rather that I believe they could mean so much more than they do today. (more…)

NASA’s PhoneSat Program to Launch Android-Powered Mini Satellites into Space

With the hope of restoring low-cost space exploration, NASA is planning to launch mini satellites into space powered by Nexus One and Nexus S smartphones. The program, called “PhoneSat” aims to launch the “lowest-cost satellites ever flown into space,” which I’m guessing just wasn’t possible if they used an iPhone instead. Zing? Two prototype satellites exist as of now, one being version 1.0, powered by the Nexus One and other is version 2.0 powered by the Nexus S.  (more…)

Verizon Needs Google [Opinion]

 

Think back to January 5th, 2010. That was the date that the Nexus One was first announced and made available for purchase. I can vividly remember the announcement. I impatiently waited for someone to review the device, but the images I saw already confirmed my suspicions: this was going to be an incredible device. Even though it wasn’t on Verizon yet, I had plans to upgrade to it as soon as possible.

This vision of the Nexus One was a phone sold directly by Google to consumers. There was no store to try the device out. You went to google.com/phone to purchase the phone. If you had T-Mobile you could buy the phone unlocked for $529 or $179 on a new two year contract. Eventually a version of the Nexus One with AT&T bands was released in March. By April it was announced that the Nexus One would never be released on Verizon and that customers should buy the Droid Incredible instead. I was crushed, but I moved on (and eventually did get a Droid Incredible, which now sits on my desk running CM7).  (more…)