Lookout Publishes First Ever Lost Phone Study, Findings Won’t Likely Shock You

Worldwide security giant Lookout, has published the first ever lost phone survey. By analyzing the data from over 15 million of their users, Lookout has realized that people spend nearly $30 billion on lost devices each year. Keep it in your pocket, folks! Along with publishing all of this data, Lookout has created the Mobile Lost & Found website, which interactively shows people where phones are being lost and helps you get a sense of just how expensive it is to lose your smartdevice.  (more…)

Can’t Live Without a Visual Representation of Android Malware Across the Globe? Lookout has an App for That

  

If stressing over malware on Android is something that you enjoy on a daily basis, the crew responsible for Lookout Security has a new release that will satisfy your needs. Their newest app titled Mobile Threat Tracker takes the last few day’s security threats that their security products have identified and displays them in a visually stunning, rain shower-ish, globe rotating manner. You can view the top threats, tap to view more info on them, and then decide for yourself if you believe that there is actually a Malware problem in Android. Is there? I’m not ready to buy into yet, but hey, the app looks snazzy.

Market Link

Wednesday Poll: Do You Use Some Form of Security App on Android?

Mobile security on Android certainly seems to have become a much bigger niche than I think most of us figured it ever would. In fact, Lookout Security today, announced that they have gone global and are now offering products in the UK, Australia and Canada to compliment their U.S. offerings. If that doesn’t scream success, then I don’t know what would.

There was a time when we all laughed at anti-virus programs, but should we continue to? You have read the few reports here or there of malware creeping in and out of a variety of markets, which can only mean one thing – that the problem isn’t going to just go away and could get worse. Dirt bag developers and scam artists have made it pretty obvious that they feel as if Android could be their next gold mine, and that’s frustrating.

So we are wondering, what security apps are you using? The poll below is just a simple yes/no question on whether or not you are using some sort of security app, but I would love to hear which apps in particular through the comments. And when we say “security,” we mean remote lock apps, anti-virus apps, etc.

Personally, I haven’t found a need to use an anti-virus app, but I usually have something like SeekDroid installed just in case I were to lose it (knocking on wood) and need to remote lock, wipe or locate it.

Do You Use Some Form of Security App on Android?

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Lookout Security Now Available For Android Tablets

Lookout Security has been making sure that Android users feel safe by providing their services for quite some time now. With device tracking, checking apps for viruses and a lot of other safety features it has become very popular among users. Lookout has just upped the bar with their new support for Android tablets. Hooray.

At Lookout, we know tablets are the new mobile frontier, so we made our same smartphone security protection and find-my-phone functionality available on any tablet or iPad—including Honeycomb, Ice Cream Sandwich and WiFi-only tablets. So regardless of which kind of tablet or iPad you have, you can keep your device safe.

Now as we can see in the above image, when you open up your Apple/Safari browser on your Motorola XOOM, you can track your devices, remote wipe, lock and set your device to “scream” so those pesky thieves get so annoyed they hopefully just give up.

Market Link

New Type Of Android Trojan Charges For Premium SMS Services

GG Tracker is a new Trojan which has recently been discovered by the lovely people over at Lookout. If users are infected by the Trojan, they are directed to an imitation of the Android Market on their mobile, to download a free app. Once it is downloaded it unknowingly goes to work by signing you up for a ton of premium SMS services, and it’s all downhill from there. Lookout has done a very extensive write up on what it is, how it works, and how to avoid it. Tim Wyatt of Lookout writes:

Lookout has identified a new Android Trojan, GGTracker, which is automatically downloaded to a user’s phone after visiting a malicious webpage that imitates the Android Market.  The Trojan is able to sign-up a victim to a number of premium SMS subscription services without the user’s consent.  This can lead to unapproved charges to a victim’s phone bill.

Have you all been browsing bad websites? Let me just say that this issue could seriously be alleviated if we all just took two seconds and make sure that what we’re browsing is such a good idea. If you’re on the Android market’s website, you better see “Android Market” somewhere in the URL.  (more…)

Lookout Identifies Another 34 DroidDream Malware Apps in the Android Market

Back in March, a number of potentially dangerous apps were found in the Android Market that had the ability to root your phone and proceed to steal personal information.  What the developer behind them was doing, was looking for some of the more popular apps in the market, downloading and repackaging them with malware, and then uploading them to the market.  They were essentially duplicates that were difficult to spot to the average user.  The group of apps were dubbed “DroidDream” and were thought to be all but wiped out – and this weekend happened.

Our pals over at Lookout Security were tipped to another batch of apps that were posing a similar threat which they are now calling “DroidDreamLight” or DDLight.  Around 34 applications and 6 developers made the list which we have for you below.  I’d suggest that you take a quick look through them all and then browse through the app list on your phone to make sure you are clean.

And I hate that we have to do this, but again, to avoid these types of problems you need to be a little more careful when downloading apps.  If the app has only been downloaded a few times, has a low rating, and is from a developer you have never heard of, you should probably avoid it.  If the app contains the words hot, sex, girls, or breasts you should probably avoid it.  If you are browsing for free “fake” versions of legitimate paid apps because you are a cheap ass, go get a job just know that you are opening yourself up to a bad time.  This isn’t rocket science – only download from reputable developers and you’ll be fine.

The full list of developers and apps is after the break.   (more…)

Thursday Poll: Worried About the Android Market and Malware in Apps?

After yesterday’s DroidDream malware story jumped into the tech spotlight, we heard opinions on the situation from a few of our readers, but never really got the feeling that any of you were all that concerned about any of it.  Sure, some of the big tech sites jumped on it and made it sound like Android was the worst thing to happen since Paris Hilton’s birth, but for the most part, average users seemed to be confident in the Google team and the openness of the market.  Is that the case or are you all just not being vocal about it?  No better way to let your voice be heard than through one of our polls.  So tell us…

Are you worried about the Android Market and malware in apps?

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DroidDream Malware Enters Official Android Market, Chaos Ensues After Root Exploit Found Embedded

Yesterday was a bad day for the Android Market.  Popular Redditor lompolo discovered odd duplicates of some very popular apps in the market and decided to download a few to see exactly what the difference was.  The news was not pretty, and the guys at Android Police jumped all over it, looking for more.  What did they discover?   Well, that developer “Myournet” was taking popular apps from the market, repackaging them with malware included, and then republishing them to the market alongside the legitimate version.  Included in these new versions was the famous root exploit “rageagainstthecage” (yep, it was rooting devices) and other embedded apks which had the potential to do some serious damage and steal more information than you can imagine…

…it does more than just yank IMEI and IMSI. There’s another APK hidden inside the code, and it steals nearly everything it can: product ID, model, partner (provider?), language, country, and userID. But that’s all child’s play; the true pièce de résistance is that it has the ability to download more code. In other words, there’s no way to know what the app does after it’s installed, and the possibilities are nearly endless.

But that’s not all.  Android security machine Lookout, stepped into the situation to help ease minds of their customers, but also found two additional developers that were distributing similarly affected apps:  Kingmall2010 and we20090202.  With these 3 “developers” combined, there were more than 50 apps in the official Android Market that could potentially steal a massive amount of information from your smartphone.   (more…)