Verizon’s New Moto X Stops by FCC With Codename “Victara,” Android 4.4.3

Verizon’s variant of the new Moto X (Moto X+1) cruised through the FCC last night under the codename “victara,” a name we saw back in June. The device measures in at the same size as the AT&T/GSM model we saw hit the FCC last week, so even though the listing doesn’t say “Moto X,” we would be surprised if this isn’t it. Plus, Motorola is set to unveil the device in a day, so we like the timing.

The listing doesn’t give us a ton of new info, although, we are still digging through it. So far, we are seeing support for Verizon’s CDMA2000, along with LTE 13 and 4. The device, like almost all Verizon phones these days, has global GSM roaming on bands 850 and 1900.  (more…)

Motorola and Sol Republic Have a New Bluetooth, Jambox-Like Speaker to Announce (Updated: DECK HD)

Last year, Motorola unveiled all sorts of special Sol Republic audio products alongside the Moto X. From color-matched MotoMaker ear buds (for free) to the Deck Bluetooth speaker, there were plenty of options to help you live out your audio dreams. According to an FCC filing for a new “Sol Republic x Motorola” product, it looks like Motorola will repeat last year’s audio offerings with the inclusion of an even bigger Bluetooth speaker.  (more…)

This is the New Motorola Skip, a Full-Blown Key Fob That Keeps Your Phone Unlocked When Near

Last year, along with the launch of the Moto X, Motorola introduced an accessory called the Skip (our review). The Skip was an attachable NFC clip that would allow you to skip the unlock PIN or pattern on your device with a simple touch. It really only had that one use. Motorola handed out the Skip for free to those who placed early Moto X orders, but it later retailed for around $20 (now $10).

As a follow-up, Motorola is on the verge of releasing a new version of the Skip, this time in the form of a Bluetooth-equipped key fob that has more uses than tap-to-unlock via NFC.  (more…)

FCC Still Concerned About Throttling, Asks All Carriers About Throttling Practices

Over the last couple of weeks, the FCC has decided that it wants to know more about the throttling or “Network Optimization” practices of wireless carriers in the US. Their initial probing began with Verizon, after the company announced plans to start throttling the top 5% of its data users who have unlimited data plans and a 4G LTE phone come October 1. Today, Reuters is reporting that the FCC is actually looking into all of the major carriers, asking for them to explain how they decide when to slow down speeds for customers, because they are still very “concerned” that the reasoning could be a business rather than engineering issue. (more…)

Samsung SM-G850F “Galaxy Alpha” Strolls Through FCC

More light is being shed this morning, as a device with model number SM-G850F, aka the Galaxy Alpha from Samsung, has gone through the FCC. The Galaxy Alpha is nothing new, though, as we have seen plenty of leaks regarding this phone for the past month.

While a device going through the FCC is always a little helpful to get a sense of what to expect when it hits the market, the filings never list out full specifications or dimensions. But when it comes to early phone info, you don’t get to be picky.  (more…)

Verizon Responds to FCC Over Throttling Questions: Unlimited Data Users Have “No Incentive Not to” Hog Resources

Shortly after we first reported Verizon’s plans to begin throttling unlimited 4G LTE data users who gobble up enough data (4.7GB per month) to land them in the top 5% of the carrier’s data users, the FCC sent a letter to VZW CEO Dan Mead, asking for answers to a couple of questions about the new policy. Today, The Verge claims to have received a copy of the letter that Verizon’s SVP of federal regulatory affairs sent in response. This official response comes on the heels of the brief statement that Big Red issued last week, which basically said that they stand by their “Network Optimization” of unlimited data users.  (more…)

Verizon Plans Response to FCC Over Throttling, Stands by Its Network Optimization

Yesterday afternoon, a letter from FCC chairman Tom Wheeler to Verizon Wireless CEO Dan Mead concerning the wireless carrier’s plans to throttle unlimited data users under its “Network Optimization” policy stole headlines. Wheeler was clear in his letter that he is both “troubled” by and concerned that this move is nothing but a chance for Verizon to add to its revenue streams. He finished by asking for a response from Big Red to three specific questions.

While we wait for Verizon to do just that, the company issued a brief statement this morning noting that it will respond, but also that the purpose of “Network Optimization” is to make sure everyone on their network always has capacity available for use.  (more…)