Lumific is a Solid Gallery Alternative for Those Not Wanting to Use Google’s Photos

A number of you who recently updated to Lollipop have made it clear to us that you are not at all excited about the fact that the stock gallery option on Nexus devices has turned into the Photos app that is attached to Google+. I think it’s safe to say that not all of us are ready to just hand over our entire photo collection to Google’s social network and cloud. And there is nothing wrong with that.

So what kinds of options do you have in the third party world for a gallery app? You may want to check out Lumific(more…)

Android 5.0 “Lollipop” Feature Recap – The Best New Features

Android 5.0 “Lollipop” is without a doubt one of the biggest (if not the) Android releases to date. There are 5,000 new APIs for developers to take advantage of, a brand new design language that will re-shape the way we look at and use apps going forward, and a couple of dozen new forward-facing features that you and I can take advantage of from day one.

Because it has been such a massive release, we have spent the better part of the last couple of months diving through the biggest features that we wouldn’t want anyone to miss out on. From a mini tour of 5.0 to the new power of Android Beam to screen pinning to multiple account setup on phones to the way Chrome acts within the app switcher, we have tried to cover almost all of it.  (more…)

Android 5.0 Feature: Tap & Go Restore and Restore From Specific Devices

I would hope that I am not in the minority when I say that pre-Lollipop, the Android setup and restore process was terrible. In fact, I don’t know if we can even consider the previous process to be much of a restore process. In the past, you input your Google account credentials and then told it to restore, though you had no idea where it was restoring from, which apps would be downloaded automatically, and if you were going to spend more time after the restore uninstalling stuff than you would have freshly installing only the things you need. But with Android 5.0, you have two new options that have been so greatly improved, I can’t even think of an adjective to describe them other than, awesome.

In Android 5.0 “Lollipop,” Google is introducing two new options for restoring your devices – Tap & Go, and specific device restores. The first, actually works just like it sounds; you tap your old device to your new device and go! With specific device restores, this is Google’s way of letting you decide which specific device you want to restore from, a method that is incredibly handy should you deal with or have owned multiple Android devices. Both are equally great, so we wanted to make sure you understood each.  (more…)

Moto X (2nd Gen) on Verizon Gets Android 5.0 “Lollipop,” Here is the Full Changelog (Updated)

The Moto X (2nd gen) on Verizon is indeed receiving an update to Android 5.0 “Lollipop” this week. Well, a soak test of the software update is rolling out to members of Motorola’s Feedback Network as I type this, but assuming it goes well, the rest of the world of Verizon Moto X (2nd gen) owners should have it before long.

Update:  Some non-soak testers are reportedly receiving the update as well. Head into Settings>About phone>System updates to check!

We were able to track down the full changelog for the update, which drops in as 22.21.11, in case you are keeping track.  (more…)

Verizon Moto X (2nd Gen) Soak Test Incoming – Lollipop? VoLTE? Both?

Last year, Motorola pushed out a freshly announced Kit Kat update to the Verizon Moto X (1st gen) in under three weeks. As you can imagine, we are still impressed by this feat, considering they not only had to test and prep the software for the phone, but it also needed approval by Big Red in order to go live for all on their network. It’s one thing to push an update to a Nexus or the new Moto X “Pure Edition,” both of which do not have carrier ties and can be given new software as manufacturers see fit; it’s a completely different struggle when a carrier is involved.

Which brings us to this year’s Moto X (2nd gen) and its impending Lollipop updates. We have already seen Motorola push Android 5.0 to the “Pure Edition,” but what about all of the carrier variants? Our team has been discussing this subject a lot over the last few days, all the while wondering if Motorola and Verizon would try and repeat last year’s success. Tim was even ready to put money on the updates starting yesterday or this upcoming Monday. While no new software has begun pushing as I type this, he might be right.  (more…)

How to: Unlock the Nexus 6 Bootloader (Nexus 9 Too)

I get that the timing of this post seems super silly, especially after the conversations we had yesterday, including one where I said I don’t buy Nexus phones to flash all the things, but you know what? Many of you did buy a Nexus 6 or Nexus 9 to do just that, flash and tinker, so we want to make sure you know how to get started. Also, the process for unlocking the Nexus 6 or Nexus 9’s bootloader that we are about to walk through is something I do with all Nexus devices I own, because there is always a chance I may want to tinker later on down the road. Why not be prepared?  (more…)

I Didn’t Buy a Nexus to Flash All the Things

If you were to ask me why I buy Nexus phones and tablets (outside of the fact that it is my job to own them), I would answer with the following in no particular order. I like stock Android better than manufacturer skins. I like swift updates to the newest versions of Android. I typically like the designs used in Nexus devices. I like to see what new technologies that Google has incorporated in the latest Nexus devices and Android platform, since Nexus devices almost always try to highlight something new in mobile. Before the Nexus 6, I was also a big fan of the low price tags that accompanied Nexus devices. And, well, that’s it. Those are the reasons.

You will notice I didn’t mention the words flash, ROM, root, recovery, bootloader, adb, SDK, boot.img, kernel, or forum. I didn’t mention those, because I buy Nexus devices for reasons that don’t involve tinkering, hacking, flashing, unlocking, and tweaking. I buy Nexus devices because I want to use them like someone would use a Galaxy S5 or Moto X or G3. I like the untouched, out of box experience.  (more…)