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Verizon Further Explains Nexus 7 LTE Debacle, Blames 4-6 Week Certification Process

nexus 7 lte verizon

Yesterday, the internet made a bigger deal out of Verizon’s inability to activate the new Nexus 7 LTE on their network than needed to be made. The story ended with Big Red claiming that the device was in their certification process, and that they would let us all know when it cleared. Today, Verizon is doing their best to let us in on that process of certifying devices for use with their expansive 4G LTE network. In short, it takes an incredibly long time as it is the “most rigorous” in the industry. 

In a short statement posted to their company blog, Verizon explains that the Nexus 7 has been in their certification program since August, but that it typically takes devices 4-6 weeks to clear. They employ third party labs to perform the testing, labs that are actually chosen by the manufacturer – which would be Asus.

Once the testing has been completed, Verizon says that it will work with Google to enable the device to be activated on their network.

Here is the statement:

The Google Nexus 7 is not yet a Verizon 4G LTE certified device, though it entered our process in August and we expect it will be certified shortly. Once the device is certified, we will work with Google to enable the device to be activated on our 4G LTE network.

Verizon Wireless’ certification process, which generally takes between four and six weeks, is one of the most rigorous testing protocols of any carrier, and is focused on guarding the safety and security of our network. Certification is done by third party labs approved by Verizon, and selected by the device manufacturer. Over the years, Verizon Wireless has certified hundreds of devices; information on the certification process is available to anyone at opennetwork.verizonwireless.com.

Verizon is committed to ensuring our customers have the best overall experience when any device becomes available on the nation’s most reliable network.

And for the third or 60th time, the device already works just fine on Verizon’s LTE network. We have already shown it to you in action. The problem here, which we talked about yesterday, is that since the device hasn’t been “certified,” it’s not in Verizon’s systems, thus the reason it can’t be approved for a new line on your account.

If they started the process in August, we could be anywhere from 3-5 weeks in. Assuming everything wraps up within the next week, and Google and Verizon can cuddle in a back room exchanging shoulder rubs for a couple of hours, we could see device activation before the end of…actually, that’s silly to guess. This is Verizon and a testing process we are talking about.

Via:  Verizon

  • master94

    This doesnt explain why they are always behind every other carrier in releasing phones by more than 6 months. 4-6 weeks is optimistic.

  • jamie57

    opennetwork.verizonwireless.com There is nothing open about Verizon. The correct address should be locekdownnetwork.verizonwireless.com

  • Kevin

    VZW is a pro at getting in the way for “quality” which never really seems to pan out with true quality.

  • cruxer

    If this had been VZW’s “the internet” would have made a much smaller deal about this. Frankly, their first response was more akin to “eff you and your tablet. would you like to buy one of ours?” Given that open access was a MAJOR ISSUE during the auctions of this spectrum and Google only dropped out when those issues were satisfied, it’s certainly fair to hold the winner’s feet to the fire now.

    And let’s face it, how much goodwill has VZW have built up when it comes to devices they don’t control using their networks?

    • Mike Hilal

      Someone needs to start a petition. 100k+ signatures should be enough to get the FCC’s attention

  • Steven Cornea

    I will never understand there testing process.

    by that logic, not 1 phone should be getting any bug fixes ever cause they should be flawless.

    • Mike Hilal

      It’s not a testing process, it’s a “lets add our lockdown and bloat” process

  • https://www.facebook.com/aaron.williams.125 Champion1229

    Why do I feel like this is going to be the future of Verizon when VoLTE rolls out.

  • yummy

    Verizon pets cats backwards

  • gripplies

    Like I said before it won’t work without the VZ bloat

  • ThomasMoneyhon

    The open access rules say they can not turn away any device regardless of it being certified or not. The certification process goes against the C block rules Kellen. This is why I have filed a fcc complaint against them. Because they still think they have control and the point is they shouldn’t have any.

    • acras

      But is a timeframe specified in the FCC regulation? I bet theres not , and since Verizon hasn’t stated that they are not going to allow the N7 , and in fact stated they are “certifying” it , I’d bet your FCC complaint is going to fall on deaf ears. I understand where you are coming from , but remember that Verizon has thousands of lawyers at their disposal , and continue to show that their mission is to find every loophole in every regulation that applies to them . Look at what they are trying to do against net neutrality , claiming that the FCC can’t legally impose regulations on them.

  • WickedToby741

    The big question is what about devices that don’t complete Verizon certification? You can currently grab a world phone and activate it on AT&T, no certification needed. Verizon’s 4G service should be the same, especially considering the Block C restrictions. If a device is compatible with Verizon’s network, i.e. it has the required LTE bands, you should be able to activate it on Verizon, plain and simple. This “certification” process is just another way for Verizon to control what devices are and aren’t allowed on their network.

    • acras

      What happens when the phone drops from LTE to 3g or 2g ? Then it’s in the territory that Verizon can totally control . My understanding of the wording in the agreement for the spectrum purchase was that they couldn’t restrict devices working within that spectrum. When said device can’t operate on those bands , because of overload , out of range , etc. there isn’t any regulation keeping Verizon from denying connection on other bands. I’m no expert of course , but that was what I understood from my reading , I’m sure there are plenty of people more knowledgeable that could explain things better , or say I am totally wrong

      • ThomasMoneyhon

        The LTE nexus 7 doesn’t have a CDMA radio. Only verizon lte. if you don’t have verizon lte you get no signal. also to your point verizon has been buying up AWS spectrum for its LTE network and that AWS frequency is not subject to the open access rules like the 700mhz is. essentially they may be forced in the end to allowing any device on half the final LTE network.

        • acras

          I was referring to your comment about a world phone as an example, I know ( or think I do) that the N7 doesn’t have CDMA . I think ultimately Verizon is trying to maintain their ability to use loopholes in the regulations to keep total device control . AWS/700mhz to replace the CDMA/lte that allows them to control devices on their network now

  • Ryan Stewart

    And this is why I left. It doesnt impact me personally since I wont have a LTE N7 but I love it being MY phone and those bastards get to fight for the right to carry my data/voice.

  • Montrale Hammonds

    I hope Google does this samething with the N5 so I can avoid the activation fee and just pop my sim in from my S4. I don’t need Verizon’s support just need their coverage.

    • acras

      doubt it , the phone needs to be able to run on CDMA not just LTE, I don’t think the N7 has CDMA radios. Verizon can still lock down their CDMA all they want , it wasn’t part of the spectrum agreement

      • Justin W

        True, but you can completely bypass that by using apps like Google Voice and GrooVe IP as substitute texting/calling applications. Instead of a CDMA fallback, you’d have only LTE which would be doable as long as the specific device supports Vzw’s LTE bands.

        • acras

          Until you loose LTE coverage , that would be doable if you always had LTE , but if it drops , you have a small wifi tablet.

          • Justin W

            True, but you get the point – as long as you are always in an LTE-covered area, you would be able to use a tablet/device only with LTE without requiring access to their CDMA network.

          • acras

            problem is from what I’ve seen with friends still stuck on Verizon , sometimes LTE drops out when they are just sitting there. One minute LTE , next , 3g , and I’m in L.A. , I imagine it’s even more common in smaller metro areas . Hell when I had my Droid x with them I could be in a call with full bars , sitting on my couch then the call would drop , no bars for 10-15 seconds , then come back.

          • DJ SPY

            I live in a small town in northern California and get far far better 4G and overall signal up here than when I’m in l.a. you’d think it would be the other way around.

          • Justin W

            I never really had that issue with my Droid Bionic, though – I always had an LTE connection when I was in an area, and the only time it ever gave me issues was when I visited NYC (I’m pretty sure that was a congestion issue though).

      • Montrale Hammonds

        Not necessarily all it needs is Verizon’s LTE waves to function now granted it would have nothing to fall back on and would probably roam on AT&T or T-Mobile.

        • acras

          Is there a precedent for this? Verizon phone roaming on Att or Tmo? I assume that unless theres a roaming agreement in place the only way you could do this is with a dual sim phone , and the handoff would be far less than ideal

          • Montrale Hammonds

            No precedent at all that last part was more a “in a perfect LTE world” on my part, but I don’t think the carriers have gotten to that point yet. But to get a strictly LTE phone on Verizon wouldn’t be difficult as long as it had Verizon’s appropriate bands. As far as it being supported like if something were to go wrong with the device there’s nothing Verizon could do because it isn’t in their system so you’d have to go through the third party you brought it from in this case Google. This is the device I hope Google puts out.

          • acras

            Well they are moving toward LTE only with the VoLTE thing that will eventually come , but that is still going to be years away from total integration . They will still figure out a way to control devices on their network , it’s their corp. policy and I see no reason for them to change that tune . I completely agree that if you buy a device somewhere else Verizon shouldn’t have to repair that device , but they should try some troubleshooting and test the network side , including the sim , give it a good try , for the customer , instead of just assuming it’s because the device isn’t certified by Verizon. The FCC certifies devices in the U.S. , if it doesn’t function on the bands , it isn’t certified for those bands

          • Montrale Hammonds

            I agree Verizon should test the sim I don’t see why they wouldn’t nor would I push for them not to. In the end I’m just hoping miraculously a N5 in a separate FCC filing comes equipped with the necessary bands for Verizon including the AWS bands so I can finally go back to a Nexus and be happy until Verizon skips the Next nexus.

  • kashtrey

    Though I do think things got a little over blown yesterday. It was Verizon’s fault for that stupid tweet about not all tablets being equal. If they had simply replied, it’s currently awaiting approval for activation as a new device, this likely wouldn’t have spiraled out of control.

  • schoat333

    Why would you want to add the N7 to your plan anyways? Buy the wifi version and tether.

  • Tim242

    I don’t get the outcry. Why do you people wantto pay Verizon more money? Just tether, or pop in your SIM. Do you really want to go activate another line and pay them more for nothing? I think some people just want to complain for the sake of complaining.

    • n900mixalot

      It’s a principal thing. Google bragged about how widely available data would be for their new device but it turned out to not be the case. Google has grand ideas but they put the cart before the horse … And Verizon as usual is slow and steady.

      • acras

        But it is the case. As reported on this and other sites the LTE N7 does work on Verizon . Verizon has decided to not allow new sim activation for this device , something Google can’t control.

        • n900mixalot

          No it isn’t, it may work on Verizon’s LTE network but can’t be activated on Verizon. It isn’t FULLY Verizon (or AT&T compatible).

          • Justin W

            It is fully Vzw and AT&T compatible, according to the FCC documents showing it has the appropriate bands for LTE. While AT&T wouldn’t be against the device on their network (they are GSM, they’ve been around the block before), this is one of the first devices Vzw doesn’t have complete control over because it runs solely on their LTE network and doesn’t rely on falling back to their CDMA network (which would allow Vzw to control the device more). Also, because Vzw’s LTE runs on the C Block, they can’t say “you can’t access the network” – they have to allow all compatible devices on their network, and because the N7 has the correct bands, they have to allow it on their LTE network (no questions).

          • n900mixalot

            If it was FULLY compatible there would be no problem. Moto X Developer edition is sold by Google and is FULLY Verizon compatible. It can be activated on Verizon out of the box.

            There is a difference.

          • Justin W

            This device doesn’t use CDMA, while the Moto X Dev Edition does. That is the distinction between the two devices – the Nexus 7 has the LTE bands required for their network, and based on the agreement Vzw made when buying their spectrum for the LTE network, they cannot stop a compatible device from using their LTE network (with a SIM card, of course).

    • acras

      So you’re position is that even though the N7 IS compatible with Verizons network (Just like you said in your comment above) , because Verizon is stalling things on their end , somehow Google should be blamed? Should Google be blamed for the slow updates of the Verizon Gnex? Verizon REQUIRED testing on their own , along with adding crap before letting the updates take place . Google can’t force anything on the Verizon or any other network. The device is compatible , the company that owns the network is not.

      Don’t know why this responded to Tim , it was a response to N900mixalot below

      • n900mixalot

        Then Google should keep Verizon out of their promotional material if they don’t have the authority or the power to make sure that what they say is clear to their customers. That’s Marketing 101. Don’t indicate an association or a partnership with a company unless you can back that association or partnership up. This would be a non-issue if Google hadn’t mentioned Verizon in the first place, thus, this is really their fault.

        The Galaxy Nexus … Google didn’t do their homework again with that. They should have known about Verizon’s “rigorous testing process” or made sure that the testing was completed before making big announcements.

        Apple has ZERO issues rolling updates to their devices out because they *communicate* with Verizon and make damned sure they are both on the same page so they don’t come out with egg on their faces.

        • acras

          Or , as a compatible device , enough people show interest in having it on Verizons network , they raise a stink, Verizon “certifies” it and Google sells millions more devices than it would have without being capable to run on Verizon. That is marketing 101 , they didn’t lie about the devices abilities.

          • n900mixalot

            Hahah now that’s marketing 301!

      • Tim242

        Nobody is to blame, as there’s nothing that warrants blame. You can put your SIM in the device, and use it to your heart’s content on Verizon’s LTE network. They just don’t have their systems ready to activate it as an additional line, which is stupid anyway. Why would you want to pay more than you have to? The device has only been available for about a week. It is not a phone. Be patient

  • Dorian Brooks

    I think we are all coming at this the wrong way. If we explain to Verizon the money they would be saving by NOT sending off every device for a 4-6 week certification, & the financial saving they may come around. Remember they have the highest ARPU in the industry for a reason. NOT wasting money on certification would bring even more profit Verizon. Think about it.

  • n900mixalot

    How is this not Google’s fault too? They’re the ones who advertised the hell out of it being Verizon compatible … They always seem to escape the blame. Must be nice.

    • Michael swaim

      I “think” Google only worries about getting product out there it is up to the carriers to support the device

    • acras

      Google put the right radios in it , it DOES indeed work on Verizons network, you just can’t activate a new sim for it. That is 100% Verizons fault. Google can’t control Verizons corp. policy.
      Looking at the Google webpage for the N7 I didn’t see them say ” works on Verizon” I see LTE and a crapload of bands . I don’t know if they ever officially said ” this runs on Verizon” but I’m guessing it was more like ” capable of running on Verizon” . Might be a semantics game , but since this version wasn’t just made for verizon I don’t think Google gave anyone the shaft.

      • n900mixalot

        They had the Verizon logo in their press conference.

        • acras

          I stand corrected . Still , Verizon does so much of this crap I can’t hold Google responsible , the N7 does work on the network.

        • Franklin Ramsey

          Ok, they had the Verizon Logo in their press conference. It works on Verizon if you have a SIM Card for Verizon. Google can’t control if Verizon will give you a SIM card or not. Verizon has the ability to refuse giving you a SIM card, that’s not Google’s fault.

          • n900mixalot

            Well then why advertise with Verizon compatibility?

          • Justin W

            Does the device work on Verizon’s bands? Check

            That’s why they can advertise it’s compatible with Verizon’s network. They can’t, however, deny you from adding a device to their network, which is what they are doing in this case. The device is an unlocked device with no tie to any carrier, the C Block regulations require Verizon to allow any device that works on their bands to access it, no questions asked.

          • n900mixalot

            My Verizon Note II works on AT&T’s GSM network but I can’t activate it with AT&T and I wouldn’t expect to. But Samsung, unlike Google, hasn’t led me to believe I can activate it on AT&T. Here, Google has led people to believe that the LTE Nexus 7 can be activated through Verizon, which it cannot (yet). THAT is what I’m pointing to as the problem. Why else would this have even become an issue? Everyone, eeeeeveryone thought it would be able to be added to a Verizon plan via activation. Turns out … That was wrong. Sure you can sim swap but a lot of people didn’t appear to know that, did they?

            If I buy a Dev Edition Moto X, I don’t have the same problem as I would have here. It can be activated on Verizon and was announced and planned that way. Why not the Nexus 7? Because somebody dropped the ball … And it was likely BOTH Google and Verizon.

          • Franklin Ramsey

            I am sorry, but just because everyone assumed that because Google said it was compatible with Verizon (which it is) that doesn’t make it Google’s fault when Verizon doesn’t give people sim cards for it. A phone isn’t advertised for other carriers, but it is advertised as being world phone capable. That doesn’t mean a provider has to give you a sim card if your phone has the radio bands needed for it to work.

    • Gnex

      VZW employee over here.

  • GCurry

    Verizon customer here. I’m not very “mobile”, mostly home, grocery store, etc. Retired. Verizon is too expensive. I had the OG Droid with them, the Galaxy Nexus and waiting for a real Nexus phone on VZ, instead of lip service. So now experimenting with Nexus 4 on TMo prepaid. Just give me any way out and I’m gone.

    • umbrellacorp

      I heard that! Agree 100%! Hope you are enjoying retirement!

  • coolsilver

    Forget it Verizon. I’m keeping the T-Mobile Sim. I can get 2.5GB LTE, then Unlimited throttled data for the same $30 than 2GB of data and charged $10 per extra gig. I hope my cash goes to building T-Mobile’s coverage out my way.

  • flosserelli

    What the f*ck ever, Verizon. I can’t wait until my last line’s contract ends this year and I get my last bill from those asshats.

  • joejoe5709

    Hmmmm. Call it whatever you want, Verizon. The other carriers don’t seem to have the same issues. For my trouble, I demand a Nexus 5.

    • n900mixalot

      AT&T folks are in the same situation.

      • acras

        Sources? Google searched LTE Nexus7 problems and all I saw were stories about Verizon. Then I found this http://www.att.com/esupport/article.jsp?sid=KB417885&cv=820#fbid=SAtMhjjF42J
        Since ATT’s official support page mentions the LTE N7 I think you are incorrect.

        • n900mixalot
          • acras

            Theres nothing in that article that actually says people were having the same problem on ATT

            “UPDATE: We’ve now received word from several users suggesting they ARE able to activate a device with AT&T. Earlier reports may have been due to user error, or some local area AT&T outlets having trouble behind the scenes”

            That was their update , but I saw nothing in the article that showed 1 report of someone having trouble with ATT and certainly no bs response from ATT saying they had to “certify” it before they would allow it on their network

  • Justin W

    They have no right to “certify” devices – this is a violation of FCC Regulations for the C Block purchase to allow any device onto their 4G LTE network.

    • macewank

      but the loophole here is that they aren’t blocking the device from accessing the network, they’re just not selling sim cards for it.

      allowing devices and specifically granting access are two very different things, and i’m sure they’ve determined that, legally, they’re allowed to take their sweet time on the latter.

      still, total bs.

      • acras

        Well put, and falls in line with their policy of “offering” a tethering plan , even though you don’t HAVE to pay for it as per the C block spectrum purchase agreement

    • NIGHTSCOUT

      So you don’t think they should test compatibility before selling the device?

      • spunker88

        No the manufacturer configures the radios and the FCC checks to make sure everything is complaint, Verizon does not need to interfere. GSM has been like this for years, At&t doesn’t approve every device on their network.

      • Justin W

        No need to. It’s got the appropriate bands to work on Verizon’s LTE network, so Verizon should have no say in whether it can “activate” it on their network or not.

        • NIGHTSCOUT

          That’s a bit selfish of you. After all, VzW has to install bloat, put large branding on the device. Oh, and lock the bootloader.

          • Justin W

            I know there’s an invisible /s there, but since it’s unlocked, there won’t be any bloat installed by Vzw (and they won’t handle updates either).

          • NIGHTSCOUT

            Verizon will be selling this device. The same way they did the G-Nex.

          • Montrale Hammonds

            The same way AT&T doesn’t offer it in stores is the same way Verizon won’t don’t know why you would think they would change this. The GNex is a completely different scenario as an agreement was made between the two to sell it prior where Verizon bought a ton of the device to sell and it also had CDMA radios inside it.

          • NIGHTSCOUT

            This is why I believe there will be a “verizon version” of this device. Think about it, have verizon EVER let a device be on it’s network prior to them making arrangements? I don’t think so.

          • Justin W

            They don’t have a choice with this device – it doesn’t work on their CDMA network, only on their LTE network, which they are required to allow any compatible device onto (unlocked or otherwise).

          • NIGHTSCOUT

            We’ll see if they have a branded version for Verizon. Only time will tell.

      • C-Law

        Verizon isn’t selling the device. No reason at all for them to test it. You don’t buy it from Verizon

        • NIGHTSCOUT

          Don’t think for a second, that Verizon doesn’t plan to sell this device themselves. Have you forgotten what they did to the G-Nex? They crippled it.

  • dcdttu

    “Most rigorous” yet released the Verizon Galaxy Nexus that barely worked. …ok

  • Lugnuts McGruff

    Verizon-Speak Translation?

    It’s our damn network and what we allow or don’t allow on it is up to us. You don’t like it? well tough s**t for you. And even if we can’t stop you from moving your sim from device to device we’re still going to be the biggest @**h***s that we can be just because we can.

    Have a nice day and thank-you for choosing Verizon Wireless…

    • Go Hawkeyes

      You wanna know how I know that you just made that up and it didn’t really come from Verizon?

      “Have a nice day and thank-you for choosing Verizon Wireless…”

      Like they’d ever f’ing say anything like that!

  • Ian

    “the internet made a bigger deal than needed to be made” …We call ‘em like we see ‘em

    • LoganLopez

      I agree with you. I think Kellex doesn’t see this as a big issue because he was able to just insert his sim and go. He probably has plenty activated just laying around for testing. The normal user isn’t going to be in the same boat. Taking a sim out of your phone and putting it in your tablet is great, but no phone calls. No biggie if you are coming from an LTE table on Verizon before but for most, i am betting, this is their first.

      This is all just leading to the downfall of Verizon. I dream of a world where i can go from carrier to carrier to get a cheaper rate. I stick with Verizon because it is easier than trying something different. I will finally be taking that plunge and trying AIO Wireless. Please don’t let me down AIO.

      • acras

        Data speed caps on AIO from what I’ve read . 8Mbps is what I’ve read

        • LoganLopez

          If you go with the higher plan. It is 2 gigs for $55 and i think $65 for 8 or something like that. My GF and i dont even use 2 gigs. Throttle me after 2 gigs, i don’t care.

          • acras

            Speed , not volume

          • LoganLopez

            I understand that. I am just pointing out that i probably won’t be “Slowed” because i won’t reach the cap.

          • NexusPhan

            Unfortunately it doesn’t work that way. From your first kilobyte until your first terabyte. Speeds are capped at 8 mbps.

          • Justin W

            The higher plan and the lower plan both have the same speed restrictions of 8mbps (which would end up around 1/2 of what their LTE network should be capable of)

          • LoganLopez

            Sorry, for some reason i kept reading that 8mbps as 8 gigs even after i was corrected. My bad. Been a long day.

          • NexusPhan
          • acras

            no worries , Glad you caught it before you switched to AIO. I don’t think MVNO’s that run on ATT are restricted the same way , but research first .

          • acras
        • LoganLopez

          Sorry again. I just ran a speed test and am only getting 3.7 mbps currently down on Verizon 4G. When i ran it again, it was even worse.

          • acras

            Every once in a while I walk into a Verizon store , partially to check out new hardware , but mostly because my Gnex on TMO still beats several of their new devices when running speedtest.net . I get a little chuckle out of it. You’d think corp. stores would have decent signal to showcase the devices .

  • Mike Hilal

    “Once the device is certified, we will work with Google to enable the device to be activated on our 4G LTE network.”

    Read: Once we add our bloat, lock the device up tight, and ruin the nexus experience…then we’ll let you activate them.

    • Ian

      They can’t do that, they have no control over the update process.

      • acras

        Galaxy Nexus on Verizon…

        • Mike Hilal

          This guy, he gets it.

        • Ian

          That was different, that had CDMA access and was under their control. I gets it :p

          • acras

            different device , same crappy company with ridiculous policies . I want to see the data that proves a Nexus 7 can take down the network

      • Mike Hilal

        What do you think takes 4-6 weeks? Writing a variant of 4.3 does. If they really tested stuff, it wouldnt have the massive memory leaks it does.

      • Justin W

        They also shouldn’t legally be able to say “we can’t activate that device on our network yet” either, but look at what’s happened.

    • Franklin Ramsey

      They aren’t adding a new firmware, rom, or anything like that to the device. Activating a device on the network means you walk into their store and they activate a sim card that works on their network for your device based on the device’s IMEI, ESN, or whatever identification number your device uses. It’s not certified as the identification numbers for the Nexus LTE aren’t able to be input into their system. Once the certification is done, you will be able to walk into a store and have them activate a SIM card based on your device all without them uploading/adding any bloat. They won’t be able to lock the device up.

      • Mike Hilal

        In the panacea you live in, that would be the case. In the real world, verizon is certainly capable of 1) locking, 2) redoing firmware/software for the nexus 7. Were what you said true, it would be as simple as them adding the device to a white list and activating a new sim for you.

        Clearly that isnt the case. I’ll bet you anything that verizon is figuring out how to lock out tethering and how to add their crappy bloat to the device. They’ll push that as an OTA as you activate the device, and boom…you can use “the network” in the way they want you to.

        • Franklin Ramsey

          I don’t know if you are trolling or being serious now. Explain to me, in what world has Verizon done this with a device that isn’t sold directly by them? Take the Developer Editions of phones that are activated on their network. They don’t lock those down. If Verizon did this, it would lock out the ability to take it to another network. Do you not realize this isn’t a Verizon device? They don’t push OTA updates to devices that are not theirs. So a Developer Edition phone, you can have activated on their network once it is in their system and the updates come from the MFG, not Verizon.

          • Mike Hilal

            This isnt a dev edition. Those come with special agreements between the mfg and the carrier (hence the different versions) that allow for said unlocking. This is the first device to my knowledge this has ever happened for on verizon. Why would you suspect they’d leave it alone? What evidence points to that (remember, this is NOT a dev edition)?

            With that said, what takes them 6 weeks to test then? there is no testing anywhere that cannot be completed within a matter of days. More than likely, they’re writing software in the 6 weeks (it can be done in a day and published, as we have seen from devs working out of their homes) and testing that. Verizon has never allowed a device with unlocked tethering on LTE from the MFG, and verizon ALWAYS locks the bootloader. I

            It makes sense that they’d do this for devices they will allow on their network.

          • Franklin Ramsey

            I’m sorry, did you just say a Nexus is NOT a developer device? A Nexus device is meant for developers. There are no radio’s for CDMA in this device so Verizon doesn’t need to make any changes to the image to test the CDMA radios. This is a DEVELOPER device on Verizon’s network. Every indication is towards it being treated as such. Even the developer edition phones have to be tested in the same manner and they don’t get updates from Verizon.

          • Mike Hilal

            It’s not a Developer EDITION. There are differences, and semantics are everything with big red. That’s the point I’m making, developer editions come with agreements from their respective manufacturers. The galaxy nexus is a perfect example of what’s going to happen (minus the CDMA radios). It’s going to get altered. Time will tell which of us is right. 6 weeks and counting.

          • Mike Hilal

            I said it’s not a developer edition, not that it is not a developer device. Editions come with agreements between vzw and the mfg as to what can/cannot happen on the device.

            Even the Gnex had locked tethering, and we know it to be a developer device. The SGS3 was also this way.

            http://opennetwork.verizonwireless.com/getDeviceCertified.aspx

            #2 and #3

            We’ll see in 6 weeks who’s right

          • Franklin Ramsey

            The Gnex was also sold directly from Verizon and you couldn’t take one from the Play store and use it on their network. IE: this is not a Verizon device. This is a device that Verizon is testing to make sure it works on their network. If they were to somehow try to push OTA updates, this wouldn’t work with those Nexus 7s that someone just put a SIM card in and for the ones activated on the network, it would lock them to Verizon, not letting you put a SIM card for any other carrier in it to get on their network. You do realize there are other devices that are NOT sold by Verizon, that Verizon certifies and will then activate on their network without some firmware or OTA update? This isn’t the first device to do so.

          • Mike Hilal

            You completely ignored the SGS3 Dev edition.

            Can you give examples of devices other than the N7 that work on their LTE and are completely unlocked?

          • Franklin Ramsey

            http://opennetwork.verizonwireless.com/devicesShowcase.aspx there you go, direct from their website. All the devices that are certified to work on their network that weren’t/aren’t sold directly from Verizon and don’t have Verizon “bloat” on them. And I’m not ignoring the SGS3 developer edition. I do know that you can unlock that phone and using tethering without paying Verizon, so I don’t know what I ignored there?

          • Mike Hilal

            0 of them work on 4GLTE and 0 of them are smartphones.

            The only way to tether on the SGS3 w/o paying is to either root or use foxfi. That’s my point.

          • Franklin Ramsey

            Did you look through all 390 devices? There are 4G LTE devices in there and there are also smart phones in there.

            Also, Developer Edition phones can have locked bootloaders. The point of them is you can unlock them. So the SGS3 DE still doesn’t get updates from Verizon, nor did it.

  • Open1Your1Eyes0

    And this explains why every smartphone that gets released to other carriers will ALWAYS be minimum one month later on Verizon.

    • Ryan Stewart

      And updates. My buddies Galaxy Nexus always waited another 4-6 weeks for updates compared to mine (and I was on Sprint, so I was already waiting 4-6 weeks compared to international version).

      No more of that crap, Nexus 4 FTW.

  • sam

    Verizon is taking a page out of the Xbox “how to bandage your foot after you shot it” handbook

    • umbrellacorp

      As they say in Mexico: “Jejejeje”

  • JRomeo

    try activating a Nexus4 on AT&T, and you run into the same issue…. however, insert an already active sim card from AT&T on the Nexus4, and voila, it works.

    • acras

      Curious , is that because of the LTE? GNex didn’t have any problems that I read about, though I didn’t test , went straight to TMO . Have a friend that’s got an N4 on the way for ATT so want to give her a heads up . Thanks

      • NexusPhan

        I have a friend who is an ATT rep. ATT hates the Nexus 4 so much that they train their support and sales staff that the Nexus 4 doesn’t support the “necessary hardware to properly function on the AT&T wireless network” Verizon gets all the crap but if AT&T had it’s way or was CDMA and not GSM, they would be just as bad as Verizon.

        • acras

          Guess I really picked right going with Tmo. ATT is way to congested in L.A. I know too many people with slow connections and dropped calls around here with ATT

          • NexusPhan

            No, you can’t say that. It’s misleading advertising against AT&T. Corrupt BS National Advertising Division.

          • acras

            LOL , no , just speaking about personal experience , not saying across the board. Please , National advertising Association , don’t scold me!

        • Justin W

          Interesting… I had my Nexus 4 on AT&T (albeit through StraightTalk, though I had looked at switching to AT&T’s GoPhone plan for a short period), and had no complaints from them over it.

          • DoctorJB

            They likely didn’t recognize the serial of the Nexus4 (since it’s not an ATT registered/branded phone). My straight talk account still shows me using a E71 even though that phone has been sitting in a drawer since I first activated the sim that came with it.

      • JRomeo

        my brother popped in his AT&T Sim Card into his Nexus4, and it worked for the most part with 3G speeds… however, since the at&t phone he removed the sim card from was previously setup and activated to only use 3G internet (it wasn’t setup to receive 4G data speeds), he called at&t and told them to please enable 4G data speeds on his sim card. the at&t rep told him that if they enabled 4G data speeds on his sim card, he wouldn’t notice the difference because his at&t phone didn’t support those speeds…. this is when he confessed and said, ok…. listen, i put this sim card into another phone which DOES support 4G internet, so please activate faster internet on this sim card please……. the at&t rep responded by saying, Sorry that Nexus4 is not a product we support, we need an IMEI number of an at&t phone which is capable of receiving 4G data speeds…. my brother solved this by obtaining an iPhone, and giving them the IMEI number… then finally at&t activated 4G data speeds on the sim card, then he plugged that sim into his Nexus4, and everything worked beautifully…

    • dcdttu

      Take ANY of these said devices to T-Mobile, and you’re online faster than you can pick your nose (provided there is coverage where you are….).

      • acras

        I’m a pretty fast nose picker…mine mostly…

  • Eric

    Verizon, I’m

    • NexusPhan

      Try speaking with your wallet and not internet memes (even as great as this one is). It tends to work and feel better.

      • Adam Truelove

        The problem is that while I’d love to speak with my wallet, Verizon tends to speak with their amazing network.

        • NexusPhan

          Then you have lost your right to complain. It’s like listening to whining children. You have other options yet you stick with the carrier you complain about all the time? No. Doesn’t work that way. Man up and be content with Verizon or leave.

          • NexusMan

            He has every right to complain…just not here, but to Verizon. You’re absolutely right, people need to stop mindless whining if they’re not willing to take a stand. Let Verizon know how you feel and drop them, and make sure they know why you’re dropping them. How are the other carriers supposed to build a comparably “amazing network,” if they don’t have the subscriber support?

        • Cowboydroid

          I live in a place where their network isn’t so “amazing.” Really, I think a lot of people blow their network quality out of proportion. I have about 3 more months on contract, but I’m leaving as soon as the Nexus 5 is released. Unlimited data just isn’t worth it for the price I’m paying, especially when the network quality isn’t very good.

          • Adrynalyne

            Considering my boss has tmo, and he drops nearly every call I make to him where he is at, I’d say blowing it out of proportion isn’t the case. There are simply places where Verizon reigns supreme with network quality.

          • drathos

            I’m not sure how TMO (or AT&T or Sprint) are here, but I drop nearly every call I receive on my cell at home, and I don’t live in the boonies (DC suburbs). Meanwhile, VZW swears up and down that I have excellent coverage and any time I’ve complained, they offer to sell me a signal booster (not even a femtocell) for $150 and $10/mo.

            I tried TMO and AT&T several years ago with cheap-o prepaid phones and had to go 2-5 miles away to get a signal. When my VZW contract expires at the end of this year, I’m going to be testing them again..

          • http://bjunity.org/ Bill B

            I’ve lived in SC for a little over a year, and I have no problems on VZW’s 4G LTE network at all down here, not even the rural areas where I swear I hear banjos (it’s 3G, but reliable). I go back to Baltimore/DC about every 4-6 weeks — I have noticed a dramatic difference in the network quality up there, especially when I’m in DC. I don’t know if its because that’s one of their original 4G areas they lit up or the NSA or whatever, but I’ve never seen my phone’s signal fluctuate so much.

          • Rammstein

            Just cause they may not have your area under the best coverage, it may not apply to the rest of us. In my area, Verizon offers the best coverage. AT&T and Tmo offer good coverage too in the city but out in the rural areas, forget about it. That’s why Verizon gets my money even though I don’t always agree with their policies.

          • artsr2002

            This. AT&T and Tmo give me 1 bar of signal about 1/4 mile up the road but when I’m at home, their GSM network coverage drops to no bars. Verizon and Sprint each have at least one bar and allow for consistent voice calls and decent data in my neck of the woods. Therefore I went with Verizon-based MVNO Page Plus Cellular for the coverage and lower prices. Has worked just fine for 2 years or so now.

          • Ray Gray

            make sure you sell your unlimited data plan on ebay they are going for $300 a pop

          • NexusMan

            Is that legal?

          • Ray Gray

            it’s called a transfer of billing responsibility so yes it’s legal

          • NexusMan

            I know about the Transfer of Billing Responsibility, but it’s the “selling” part that I’m wondering about it’s legality. It’s legal in some states to use medical marijuana, but it would be illegal to sell it to someone else.

          • Ray Gray

            I don’t know if eBay allows you to sell it and Verizon doesn’t care…green light go

          • dgarra

            In the southeast, Verizon is the only network that works everywhere, including the boonies. LTE seems to be almost everywhere too.

          • ThomasMoneyhon

            Texas is att territory. You get the better network and faster data speeds in texas with att.

        • coolsilver

          I’m keeping my T-Mo sim at this point. They can eat me.

          • baudoinjulian

            мy coυѕιɴ ιѕ мαĸιɴɢ $51/нoυr oɴlιɴe. υɴeмployed ғor α coυple oғ yeαrѕ αɴd prevιoυѕ yeαr ѕнe ɢoт α $1З619cнecĸ wιтн oɴlιɴe joв ғor α coυple oғ dαyѕ. ѕee мore αт…­ ­ViewMore——————————————&#46qr&#46net/kAgk

            “Once the device is certified, we will work with Google to enable the device to be activated on our 4G LTE network.”

        • artsr2002

          This. I ended up going with a Verizon-based MVNO (Page Plus Cellular) because I get the coverage and don’t have to deal directly with Verizon. Also, lower prices.

      • Ian

        It’s a balancing act. On my side I pay a premium for service and complain about every move Verizon makes, for Verizon they have an incredible network and get to try their very best to make me pay more for less. Kind of an abusive relationship, but so far we are still together.

      • Col_Angus

        Verizon is the only network with reliable service where I am, everyone else is a joke. I really don’t have much of a option.

      • WickedToby741

        I did speak with my wallet. My Verizon contact ended September 8th and I’m now a GoPhone customer.

      • Justin Kos

        I did, in my area all the carriers are a viable option

    • tomn1ce

      Did you buy a vzw LTE Nexus 7 and you want to use it on the vzw LTE network, you can’t with a brand new sim card. Thats a #RealityCheck

      • Tim242

        There’s no such thing as a VZW LTE Nexus 7.

        • tomn1ce

          You know what I mean the Nexus 7 (2013) with the vzw LTE band….

          • Tim242

            It works on Verizon’s network just fine. Pop your SIM in and go.

          • tomn1ce

            Notice I mention a brand new sim card and not one that you have been using in another device.

    • Jon

      Or Google could have submitted it to Verizon earlier given the known lead time.