Home

Share this Story

HTC Plans to Unlock the Bootloader on the Sensation, What About the Incredible 2?

HTC made headlines a couple of weeks ago when their CEO announced that they will never lock another bootloader – and then everyone discovered that the HTC Sensation 4G was all locked up, prompting many of you to ask when this new policy would go into effect.  The good news is that HTC plans to make it right at some point in the near future, has their support reps telling users that they are still committed to leaving their phones unlocked, and will issue an update that will take care of it.

We are currently developing new bootloader unlocked software for your phone. HTC is still committed to allowing our customers to unlock the bootloaders if they wish, however we are still implementing the policy and many updates were already finalized prior to our change in policy. We apologize for the inconvenience, but be assured that we are working on a solution for our customers and our commitment has not changed. Please stay tuned to our official channels for ongoing updates on how we will be implementing this policy.

We’re happy for Sensation 4G owners and all, but can’t help but wonder about the future of the DROID Incredible 2?  As far as we can tell, HTC decided to start locking bootloaders with the Thunderbolt (which has been unlocked, thankfully) and continued that trend with the Inc2 which is what caused the cries for the bootloader policy change.  So if they plan to re-visit the Sensation’s, then they better head back a couple more weeks to the phone that brought about this whole new era of unlocking.

Might be a good time to make sure HTC hasn’t forgotten about this device.  You can find them on Twitter at @htc and through their support page here.

Via:  XDA

  • http://qecige.sytes.net/flexeril-zoloft.html Serjey1959

    I want to show appreciation to this writer just for rescuing me from this particular situation. Just after checking throughout the world-wide-web and seeing tips which are not beneficial, I believed my life was done. Existing without the strategies to the issues you have resolved through your article is a critical case, and those which might have negatively damaged my career if I had not noticed your website. Your good expertise and kindness in taking care of every aspect was excellent. I am not sure what I would have done if I had not discovered such a point like this. I can also now look ahead to my future. Thanks a lot very much for the high quality and amazing guide. I won’t be reluctant to recommend your web page to anybody who would need assistance about this matter.

    Welcome to my blog ibuprofen during the two week wait!

  • Anonymous

    But if Thunderbolt is unlocked by HTC then there is no reason for the work around, right? I’m just wondering because when I rooted my Droid I didn’t need ADB, so I never fooled with it.

  • Anonymous

    Sorry guys I’m a little bit of a noob…. What’s the big deal with the bootloaders? So My tbolt is unlocked?

    • Knightcrusader

      The bootloader is like the BIOS in your computer… it starts up the hardware and starts the operating system, and hands off control of the device to the OS to keep booting.

      Well, for some phones, they put an encryption key in the bootloader that will only boot up operating systems that match the same key. It’s like you buying a computer now that comes with Windows XP, and they say you can’t load Windows Vista or 7 or Linux or any other OS of your choice… unless they release their own copy of it to you loaded with AOL and McAffee trials that you can’t get rid of… oh, and they lock you into a limited-user account and keep the administrator account off limits (which for us is root).

      So, the problem is they cripple the phones to make you reliant on them for updates. Just like the OG Droid… the last official update was 2.2, but we have 2.3 and even 3.0 (in some degree) running on it, just because its unlocked.

      • Knightcrusader

        I didn’t mean to say Just like the OG Droid, I meant “See what we can do with the OG Droid”… where is the edit button?

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Michael-Forte/542650247 Michael Forte

    All the people saying no more Moto for them, HTC is your next phone you are in for a surprise. Don’t expect any HTC devices to be unlocked on Verizon. We got lucky with the Thunderbolt. And you can expect Samsung devices to be next. Verizon doesn’t want us getting rid of their bloatware and tethering for free. Its sad but true. Verizon has the best network hands down but if they keep up this locking down, Sprint might be the only option because I’m definitely not going to AT&T.

  • ShaneBoddie

    Have they already sent the update to unlock the Thunderbolt? I haven’t gotten anything. Also once its unlocked will everyone be able to flash ROMS? My OG Droid was rooted on day one but I’m kinda if’y about ADB.

  • Coaster36

    What about the thunderbolt kellex? Did it fall off the face of the earth already? Show some love!

    • EC8CH

      There is already a method of fully rooting the TB but not the Dinc2, that’s why the focus of this article is on HTC phones that aren’t currently able to be fully unlocked.

  • Romma1

    I thought Verizon reversed their previous statements about locked bootloader policy? We need to start pressuring HTC again on the Dinc II and other or future HTC/Verizon phones to get to the bottom of this. I want a Dinc II, but I am waiting on HTC…   

  • http://twitter.com/_parkeryates Parker Yates

    When was the Thunderbolt unlocked? Is there an unrevoked available for it?

    • Knightcrusader

      It was unlocked by overwriting the bootloader with the bootloader from an unlocked dev version of the Thunderbolt. There is a small risk in doing it (messing up overwriting the bootloader = brick), but so far it seems with some simple md5sum checks you can minimize the chance of that happening. For me, its worth the risk.

      Of course, if they release an official unlock, that would be even better. :-)

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=716789798 Lonnie Kerchief

    Hello Moto?

  • Anonymous

    Sent them a tweet asking about this this morning. Hopefully it happens for us Incredible 2 owners as well.

  • Rain_king46

    It is my understanding that the carriers are the ones who were pushing for the locked bootloaders, so if HTC is saying that they are not going to lock them any more, how does that affect their future devices on Verizon and AT&T?

    • EC8CH

      The US carriers are all basically evil and hate their customers.  Deep down they’re afraid of smart phones because they give their customers open access to the internet and they can’t charge us ridiculous prices for stupid $h!t like ringtones and wallpapers.  They hate that we can get navigation for free instead of paying them $20/month so the preload their crapware SleezyNavigator onto our phones and lock them down so we can’t uninstalled it.  Their afraid of smartphone messaging apps taking away the $20/month we pay them for texting plans that costs them next to nothing.  They despise free tether apps because they loose another $20/month they squeeze out of their customers.  They need to be turned into stupid information tubes, otherwise they will continue to be the largest obstacle progress.

      • Inkster09

        Your in rare form today

        • EC8CH

          Is any of that not true?

          • Knightcrusader

            You are right, it is true. I remember when I first jumped to a Smartphone… I had an E815 and was tired of being locked out of bluetooth functions, and not being able to copy ringtones from MicroSD to phone memory.

            So, I got my first smartphone: a Samsung SCH-i760 with WinMo6.0 and I loved being able to load whatever I wanted and doing what I wanted with my phone without restrictions… even tethering!

            Then what happened? Well everyone started moving to smartphones, so they start releasing smartphones that are locked down just like the dumbphones were of yesteryear. No matter how far I jump ahead, their petty crap keeps catching up with me.

      • RW-1

        A post we can all agree with …

      • Anonymous

        Great points! When you look at the top paid apps on the market it certainly tells the tale. Customers are showing that they want the freedom and options. Meanwhile, phone companies are trying to milk last decade’s cash cow.  Eventually the people will win out, the market will drive that decision.

        But it will be a while before phone companies come to terms with the fact
        that they’re just selling us small computers that happen to have phone
        functionality. The early promise of an open operating system on a phone still has yet to arrive.

        The other day my mother-in-law (in her 60s) asked me about rooting her Droid X…if that isn’t a sign of the general atittude out there, I don’t know what is.

        • EC8CH

          I suggest your mother-in-law start a new public awareness organization MALB…

          Mother Against Locked Bootloaders

        • http://www.facebook.com/derek.dt Derek Robinson

          The biggest problem in my eyes, is that customers don’t always do their research like they should. They buy a new phone, hear about rooting, decide to give it a go, and now their phone is broken because they didn’t know what they were doing. Now they have a brick and take it to Verizon and Co all upset that their shiny new toy stopped working and they don’t know why which causes extra overhead for Verizon that could easily have been avoided by locking the phone down.

          I also imagine that network companies have a hard time selling those spots for bloatware if the companies know how easily it can be removed.

          • EC8CH

            Sorry I’m not going to cry for VZW if their unable to sell space on my phone for some companies trail version bloatware if I’m not stuck with it for the 2 years of my contract.

            Bricking phones is caused by all the obstacles put in place for customers to gain full access to their hardware.  Remove those obstacles and give us full access in the first place.

          • http://www.facebook.com/derek.dt Derek Robinson

            I’m not saying you should, I certainly wouldn’t. And I’m not defending them in anyway. I want unlocked bootloaders and I hate the bloatware on my incredible2.

            I simply meant that there are logical reasons for Verizon to not want unlocked phones. It costs them money, and they like money.

    • EC8CH

      The US carriers are all basically evil and hate their customers.  Deep down they’re afraid of smart phones because they give their customers open access to the internet and they can’t charge us ridiculous prices for stupid $h!t like ringtones and wallpapers.  They hate that we can get navigation for free instead of paying them $20/month so the preload their crapware SleezyNavigator onto our phones and lock them down so we can’t uninstalled it.  Their afraid of smartphone messaging apps taking away the $20/month we pay them for texting plans that costs them next to nothing.  They despise free tether apps because they loose another $20/month they squeeze out of their customers.  They need to be turned into stupid information tubes, otherwise they will continue to be the largest obstacle progress.

  • Anonymous

    tinyurl.com/2df4ccp 

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=25001493 Hank Godwin

    There is a simple solution to all of this.  Do not buy a phone with a locked bootloader if you ever want it unlocked.

  • EC8CH

    Either that, or just bring the unlocked Sensation to VZW :-)

  • http://twitter.com/mfg68 MFG

    So what can you do with a fully unlocked device? Install, say, a stock Gingerbread ROM? CM7?

  • EC8CH

    Probably has something to do with the Sensation NOT being on VZW

    • Anonymous

      I’d tend to think your reason is 100% correct.

      • http://twitter.com/mfg68 MFG

        So, what, every HTC phone that comes out on Verizon from this point forward is going to be locked? That goes against everything the HTC CEO said. Does that mean no more HTC phones on Verizon? lol

        • EC8CH

          Moto said they were open to unlocking their devices too, but hinted that the carriers have the final say.  

          The phone manufactures have never been the problem (except Moto and their insistence that everyone loves Blur).  They’re not the ones with excessive amounts of power and control.  It’s the US carriers (all 2 and 1/2 of them) that use their near monopolistic power to limit what choices are available to the public and limit how we can access the internet on the airspace they lease from the FCC.

          * VZW = 1
          AT&T&T = 1
          Sprint = 1/2

      • http://twitter.com/mfg68 MFG

        So, what, every HTC phone that comes out on Verizon from this point forward is going to be locked? That goes against everything the HTC CEO said. Does that mean no more HTC phones on Verizon? lol

      • Inkster09

        Do u concur doctor? I concur

        • max0442

          Dammit! Why didn’t I concur?

          • Inkster09

            Lol

  • Anonymous

    How did the thunderbolt get unlocked anyways?

    • Anonymous

      Devs had pre-release firmware that could be flashed, allowing then to get s-off….

    • Anonymous

      I would like to know the same, how does it get unlocked?

      • kurttrail

        Not easily

  • Anonymous

    How about an update to the T-bolt that unlocks the bootloader? Maybe with GB…

  • Anonymous

    Fully unlocking the Thunderbolt wouldn’t be bad either. I know we can unlock it, but it would be nice if we didn’t have to.